Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2014

The 2014 Monitoring the Future College Students and Adults survey shows trends in alcohol, marijuana, nicotine, and stimulant use in college students and non-college peers.
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NIDA redesigns Easy to Read and Learn the Link websites for mobile devices

This new responsive design model automatically adjusts each page to fit the viewer’s screen for faster and easier viewing and navigation on a variety of mobile platforms, such as smartphones and tablets.

Appetite Hormones Play a Role in Alcohol Dependence and Craving

Recent research has suggested that appetite-regulating hormones ghrelin and leptin may play a role in alcohol use disorders.

NIDA and NIAAA commentary strongly supports brain disease model of addiction

These findings, along with ongoing research, are helping to explain how drugs and alcohol affect brain processes associated with loss of control, compulsive drug taking, inflexible behavior, and negative emotional states associated with addiction.

Addiction Is a Disease of Free Will

When I was five or six years old, my grandfather—my mother’s father—died of what I was always told was complications of heart disease. It was not until much later that I learned the real reason for his death.

NIDA highlights drug use trends among college-age and young adults in new online resource

Use of illicit drugs, including marijuana, has been rising steadily among college-aged young adults. In addition, non-medical use of stimulants, including Adderall and Ritalin, has more than doubled in the past few years.

Drug and Alcohol Use - A Significant Risk Factor for HIV

From 2005 to 2009, 1 in 3 persons with HIV was a current drug user or binged on alcohol
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Drugs of Abuse: 
Drug Topics: 
July 2014

Within the 2 weeks prior to responding to a nationwide survey, 28 percent of high school seniors were in a vehicle whose driver had been using marijuana or another illicit drug, or had drunk 5 or more alcoholic drinks.

March 2014

Microneedles are an innovative technique for delivering medications through the skin, a route that could particularly benefit patients receiving naltrexone therapy for opioid and alcohol dependence. Researchers have found a way to use the transdermal technique to deliver a single treatment of naltrexone that lasts for 7 days.

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