Skip Navigation

Link to  the National Institutes of Health  
The Science of Drug Abuse and Addiction from the National Institute on Drug Abuse Archives of the National Institute on Drug Abuse web site
Go to the Home page
   

Workshop on HIV Prevention/Intervention in Drug-Using Populations: Research Outcomes and Principles of Effective Behavioral Intervention Applications and Implementation


Rockville, MD
January 27-28, 2000
SUMMARY


Workshop Sponsor:

Center on AIDS and Other Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (CAMCODA)/NIDA
Richard H. Needle, Ph.D.
Elizabeth Y. Lambert, M.Sc.
Helen Cesari, M.Sc.


Summary of Meeting:

Workshop Purpose:

A NIDA-sponsored workshop on "HIV Prevention/Intervention in Drug-Using Populations: Research Outcomes and Principles of Effective Behavioral Intervention Applications and Implementation" was held January 27-29, 2000 in Rockville, Maryland. The purpose of the Workshop was to convene a panel of researchers with expertise on HIV prevention in drug-using populations to: (1) review the scientific literature on the principles of effective behavioral interventions for drug users, (2) develop a final set of principles that is both comprehensive and representative of the best science available, and (3) translate the principles for application and implementation by community health planners, medical practitioners, service providers, and others responsible for the planning, developing, implementing, and monitoring of comprehensive, cost-effective HIV prevention programs in their communities.

Workshop Process:

The agenda for the 2-day Workshop included an overview of its purpose and objectives, followed by researcher presentations and discussions of the scientific literature on principles of effective behavioral interventions for drug users. Each of the participants gave presentations on two of the ten principles of HIV prevention described in the Public Health Reports (volume 113, supplt 1, June 1998). They discussed the relevance, necessity, and adequacy of the principles, whether they should be augmented or revised, and whether they should be presented in a specific sequence or priority order and why. They also described the HIV prevention research findings on which a given principle was based and, as appropriate, provided input as to whether changes should be made to the principle and why (e.g., because of new evidence or emerging research findings on the effectiveness of behavioral interventions to prevent HIV in drug users). Finally, to help anticipate issues that may arise in translating empirically-based research into practice, the presenters were invited to ask and answer 3-4 hypothetical questions that they thought might be asked by community health planners, medical practitioners, service providers, care givers, and others responsible for the planning, developing, implementing, and monitoring of comprehensive, cost-effective HIV prevention programs in their communities.

Discussion sessions were held for presenters and participants to comment on the principles that were presented and to discuss other sources of scientific information on effective HIV prevention programs in drug users.

The 2-day presentation and discussion process of the Workshop resulted in agreed-upon principles on HIV prevention in drug-using populations that were both comprehensive and representative of the best science available.

Next Steps:

Following the Workshop, NIDA and several of the participants compiled the presentation and discussion materials into a central document, which has served as the basis for development of a forthcoming research-based guide, The Principles of Effective Behavioral Interventions to Prevent HIV/AIDS in Drug Using Populations: A Research-Based Guide. The Guide is expected to be available by early spring, 2001.

The purpose of the research-based guide is to provide practical guidelines on the development and implementation of effective behavioral interventions for preventing the spread of HIV among drug users across a variety of community contexts. The guide will summarize the basic overarching principles of effective HIV interventions for drug users, and will be designed to serve as an informational resource for community health planners, medical practitioners, service providers, and care givers in the development of comprehensive, practical plans for implementing cost-effective HIV prevention programs in their communities.


For additional information about NIDA send e-mail to information@nida.nih.gov




Archive Home | Accessibility | Privacy | FOIA (NIH) | Current NIDA Home Page
National Institutes of Health logo_Department of Health and Human Services Logo The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Questions? See our Contact Information. . The U.S. government's official web portal