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Assessing the Impact of Childhood Interventions
on Subsequent Drug Use
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Barbara J. Burns, Ph.D.
Scott N. Compton, Ph.D.
Helen L. Egger, M.D.
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Alaattin Erkanli
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Linda M. Collins
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Service Use Among Adolescents With Comorbid Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders

Paul E. Greenbaum

Part 4: Results

Links to other parts of this paper:


Results

Co-occurrence during Wave 1 and services received. Among the 557 children who had a DSM-III MH disorder when assessed at Wave 1, 21.5% (n = 120) had a co-occurring SU disorder (i.e., alcohol or marijuana). Table 1 displays the relative frequencies for each of the 11 services received by those with either a single or dual diagnosis. Results of the logistic regression analyses indicated that the children with a co-occurrence had received significantly higher rates of alcohol and drug counseling (43.7% vs. 12.8%, Wald x2 [1, 492] = 18.36, p < .0001, adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.20) and contact with law enforcement (66.7% vs. 36.5%, Wald x2 [1, 502] = 11.84, p < .001, AOR = 2.37) than their peers who had only a MH disorder. None of the other services indicated significant differences by co morbidity status (ps > .05) or had AORs equal to or greater than 2.00.

Wave 4 co-occurrence as predictor of services received. A similar service use pattern was found for the 483 children who were assessed at Wave 4 with a MH disorder (See Table 2). Among this group, 24.8% (n = 120) had a co-occurring MH and SU disorder. The logistic regression analyses indicated that there were significant differences in the proportion of single versus dual disordered who received: (a) alcohol and drug counseling (16.4% vs. 30.4%, respectively, Wald x2 [1, 425] = 10.95, p < .001, AOR = 2.58), and (b) contact with law enforcement (56.4% vs. 67.6%, respectively, Wald x2 [1, 425] = 4.56, p < .05, AOR = 1.72). As at Wave 1, children with co-occurring MH and SU disorders received more of these services than those who had only a MH disorder. Additionally, fewer children with co-occurrence received psychotropic medication (13.7% vs. 27.1%, respectively, Wald x2 [1, 374] = 5.28, p < .05, AOR = 2.14) and special education classes (55.8% vs. 83.1%, respectively, Wald x2 [1, 258] = 6.62, p < .05, AOR = 2.70). No significant differences or AORs greater than or equal to 2.00 were found in the other seven services queried.

Co-occurrence as predictor of services received at any time during the 6-year study period. Among the 668 children who were assessed with a DSM-III MH disorder at either Wave 1 or Wave 4, 29.3% (n = 196) had a co-occurring MH and SU disorder. Results of the logistic regression analyses indicated that only for alcohol and drug counseling and contact with law enforcement was there a significant difference between the single and co-occurrence groups (See Table 3). Among those with co-occurrence, 54.1% received alcohol or drug counseling compared to 27.1% with only a MH disorder (Wald x2 [1, 661] = 34.52, p < .05, AOR = 3.09) and 81.1% had contact with law enforcement compared to 65.5% with only a MH disorder (Wald x2 [1, 661] = 11.83, p < .05, AOR = 2.13). Receipt of the other services were not significantly different or had AORs greater than or equal to 2.00 between the groups.

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