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National Institute on Drug Abuse · National Institutes of Health

National Conference on Drug Addiction Treatment: From Research to Practice

Speaker Biographies

Keynote Speakers


Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D.
Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
6001 Executive Blvd
Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (301) 443-6480

Dr. Alan Leshner was appointed Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) in February 1994. As one of the institutes within the National Institutes of Health (NIH), NIDA supports over 85 percent of the world's research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction. Prior to joining NIDA, Dr. Leshner had been with the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) since 1988, holding the positions of Deputy Director, then Acting Director. He came to NIMH from the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he held a variety of senior positions, focusing on basic research in the biological, behavioral, and social sciences and on science education. As a professor of psychology at Bucknell University, Dr. Leshner's research concentrated on the biological bases of behavior. Dr. Leshner received his undergraduate degree in psychology from Franklin and Marshall College and his master's and doctoral degrees in physiological psychology from Rutgers University.


General Barry R. McCaffrey, USA (Ret.)
Director of the Office of the President
Office of National Drug Control Policy
Washington, DC 20503
(202) 395-6700

General Barry McCaffrey, USA (Ret.) was confirmed by unanimous vote of the U.S. Senate as Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) on February 29, 1996. He serves as the senior drug policy official in the Executive Branch as the President's chief drug policy spokesman. He is also a member of the National Security Council and the Cabinet Council on Counternarcotics. Prior to his current position, General McCaffrey was the Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Southern Command based in Panama. General McCaffrey began his distinguished military career at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. He served four combat tours: one in the Dominican Republic, two in Vietnam, and one in Iraq. When he retired from active duty, he was the most highly decorated officer and the youngest four-star general in the U.S. Army. He received two awards of the Silver Star for heroism, four awards of the Bronze Star, and three Purple Heart medals for wounds sustained in combat. General McCaffrey has a master's degree in Civil Government from American University and has taught American Government, National Security Studies, and Comparative Politics at West Point.


Conference Speakers, Moderators, and Discussants


Andrea G. Barthwell, M.D.
Encounter Medical Group
1010 Lake Street, Suite 210
Oak Park, IL 60301
(708) 383-2700; Fax: (708) 383-2959
E-mail: agbmd@aol.com

Dr. Barthwell is President of Encounter Medical Group, Oak Park, Illinois, and Medical Director of BRASS Foundation and T.A.S.C. in Chicago, Illinois. She was certified by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) in 1986. Dr. Barthwell cochaired ASAM's Review Courses in Substance Use Disorders and ASAM's State of the Art in Addiction Medicine Courses from 1989 to 1994, is presently a member of ASAM's Board of Directors, and is Immediate Past President of the Illinois Society of Addiction Medicine.

Dr. Barthwell is Senior Health Adviser, National Women's Resource Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Abuse and Mental Illness, and serves as a special consultant in the areas of training in chemical dependency, violence, cultural issues, and HIV spectrum disease to the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) in Washington, DC. Dr. Barthwell recently chaired one of CSAT's protocol statements on infectious disease screening in drug abuse treatment programs. As a nationally recognized lecturer, Dr. Barthwell has delivered thousands of hours of training to a variety of audiences. She hosted a weekly cable television show on AIDS and has provided expert testimony on cases that related to domestic violence and drug and alcohol use or abuse. Dr. Barthwell also authored a chapter in the State Methadone Maintenance Treatment Guidelines. She is a former member of the Drug Abuse Advisory Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.


Jack D. Blaine, M.D.
Treatment Research Branch, Division of Clinical and Services Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
6001 Executive Blvd
Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (301) 443-0107; Fax: (301) 443-8674
E-mail: jack_blaine@nih.gov


Lawrence S. Brown, Jr., M.D., M.P.H.
Division of Medical Services, Evaluation and Research
Addiction Research and Treatment Corporation
22 Chapel Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 260-2917; Fax: (718) 522-3186
E-mail: artcbrown@aol.com

Dr. Brown is a physician-researcher trained in internal medicine, neuroendocrinology, and addiction medicine. He has appointments as Attending Physician at Harlem Hospital, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, and Clinical Associate Professor of Public Health at Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Brown provides consultation to a host of government and private agencies, and he serves as Medical Adviser to the National Football League. Dr. Brown's scientific contributions have focused on sequelae of and improving treatments for drug addiction and drug abuse-related transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). He has made presentations at national scientific public health and medical meetings and has authored over 40 peer-reviewed articles and more than 100 published abstracts.


Milton L. Bullock, M.D.
Hennepin County Medical Center
701 Park Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55415
(612) 347-2972; Fax: (612) 904-4299

Following his graduation from Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Bullock interned at Minneapolis General Hospital. After serving for 2 years as General Medical Officer in the U.S. Air Force, Dr. Bullock returned to Minneapolis General (now Hennepin County Medical Center [HCMC]) for residency and a fellowship in nephrology. Dr. Bullock has served in a number of roles at HCMC and is presently Director of the Addiction and Alternative Medicine Division in the Department of Medicine. An Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Bullock has research interests in the use of acupuncture for substance abuse and outcome measurement for complementary/alternative medicine.


Kathleen M. Carroll, Ph.D.
Yale University School of Medicine
34 Park Street, Room S-208
New Haven, CT 06519
(203) 789-7080, ext. 336; Fax: (203) 789-7088
E-mail: carrollkm@masp03.mas.yale.edu

Dr. Carroll is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine, Director of Psychotherapy Research at the Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, and Scientific Director of the Center for Psychotherapy Development for Opioids and Cocaine at Yale. The author of over 90 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and manuals, Dr. Carroll's research and treatment interests include studies specifying and evaluating psychosocial treatments for substance users, linking treatment interventions to outcomes, and evaluating combinations of psychotherapy and medications to enhance treatment outcome.

Dr. Carroll is currently a consulting editor for several addiction and psychology journals. She serves on the scientific advisory panel of a number of research institutions and consults frequently with treatment researchers and clinical programs across the country.


Shirley D. Coletti, D.H.L.
Operation PAR, Inc.
10901-C Roosevelt Boulevard, Suite 1000
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
(813) 570-5080; Fax: (813) 570-5083
E-mail: pdonalds@nurse.hsc.usf.edu

For more than 28 years, Dr. Coletti, Operation PAR's President, has been a leading advocate for women substance abusers, their children and families, and high-risk youth. She is also a leader in the field of substance abuse prevention and treatment. Dr. Coletti has served on the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control, the National Institute on Drug Abuse Advisory Council, as a U.S. delegate to international drug abuse conferences, and as an adviser to State and national leaders. She served on the National Commission on Model State Drug Laws and presently serves on the advisory council for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT). Dr. Coletti and Operation PAR have been recognized by the George Washington University Center for Health Policy Research in Washington, DC, as leaders in the substance abuse treatment provider field. Dr. Coletti holds an honorary doctorate in Humane Letters from the University of South Florida.


Dennis C. Daley, M.S.W.
Center for Psychiatric and Chemical Dependency Services
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
3811 O'Hara Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 383-2710; Fax: (412) 383-1268
E-mail: daleydc@msx.upmc.edu

Mr. Daley is involved in developing and managing treatment and research programs on addiction and dual disorders at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Mr. Daley has contributed to more than 120 books, workbooks, and videotapes that deal with recovery from alcohol and drug problems, psychiatric disorders, dual disorders, and relapse prevention. Mr. Daley teaches classes on these subjects throughout the United States and other countries. He is involved in several federally funded research projects on treatment of cocaine addiction and treatment of dual disorders. He codeveloped the group drug counseling (GDC) treatment model used in a multisite clinical trial and served as coauthor of the GDC Clinician Manual.


Thomas A. D'Aunno, Ph.D.
School of Social Service Administration
University of Chicago
969 East 60th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 702-1121; Fax: (773) 702-0874
E-mail: tdaunno@midway.uchicago.edu

Dr. D'Aunno, Associate Professor in the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration, joined the University of Chicago in 1994 after 10 years as a faculty member at the University of Michigan and the Institute for Social Research. Dr. D'Aunno's research focuses on the structure and performance of human service organizations. He is currently the Principal Investigator of a national study of outpatient drug abuse treatment services funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). This study, which involves several hundred treatment units over a decade, examines how well treatment units are meeting key standards of care, including access to care. Dr. D'Aunno received his doctoral degree in Organizational Psychology from the University of Michigan.


George De Leon, Ph.D.
Center for Therapeutic Community Research
National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
Two World Trade Center, 16th Floor
New York, NY 10048
(212) 845-4421; Fax: (212) 845-4698
E-mail: george.deleon@ndri.org

Dr. De Leon is Director of the Center for Therapeutic Community Research in New York City, which is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and Research Professor of Psychiatry at New York University. Author of numerous scientific publications, Dr. De Leon has edited three books and three NIDA Research Monographs, which address issues of theory, research, and practice in therapeutic communities. Dr. De Leon is associated with Therapeutic Communities of America (TCA) and the World Federation of Therapeutic Communities (WFTC). He regularly consults with drug treatment programs, community action groups, and schools. He is a founding member and fourth President of the American Psychological Association Division (50) on the Addictions. Dr. De Leon received the 1993 NIDA Pacesetter Award for Outstanding Leadership in Pioneering Research on the Therapeutic Community Approach to Drug Abuse Treatment. He has also maintained a private clinical practice for over 30 years. Dr. De Leon received his doctoral degree in Psychology from Columbia University.


Robert E. Drake, M.D., Ph.D.
Psychiatric Research Center
2 Whipple Place, Suite 202
Lebanon, NH 03766
(603) 448-0126; Fax: (603) 448-0129
E-mail: robert.e.drake@dartmouth.edu

Dr. Drake is the Andrew Thomson Professor of Psychiatry and Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School and Director of the New Hampshire-Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center. In addition to working actively as a clinician in community mental health centers for the past 18 years, Dr. Drake is well known for his research on co-occurring substance use disorder and severe mental illness. He has been Principal Investigator or co-Principal Investigator on 18 research grants and has written 200 books and articles that cover diverse aspects of adjustment and quality of life among persons with severe mental disorders.


Bennett W. Fletcher, Ph.D.
Services Research Branch, Division of Clinical and Services Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
6001 Executive Blvd
Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (301) 443-4060; Fax: (301) 443-6815
E-mail: bf31v@nih.gov


Allan W. Graham, M.D.
Chemical Dependency Treatment Services
Kaiser Permanente
10350 East Dakota Avenue, Suite C
Denver, CO 80231
(303) 367-2812; Fax: (303) 367-2828
E-mail: Allan.W.Graham@kp.org

Dr. Graham, a specialist in internal medicine, has worked in the field of addiction medicine since 1982, when he and two other internists opened a treatment facility for alcoholics in their rural Vermont community hospital. Over the past decade, Dr. Graham developed a specific interest in brief intervention strategies for alcohol use problems presenting in primary care medical settings. He is a strong proponent of research investigations concerning clinical efficacy of alcoholism treatment, and has been active in physician education through numerous programs of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). Dr. Graham received his undergraduate education and medical education at Yale University and his postgraduate training at Stanford University and the University of Vermont. He is Board certified in Internal Medicine, certified in addiction medicine, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, and a Fellow of ASAM.


John S. Gustafson
National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, Inc.
808 17th Street, NW, Suite 410
Washington, DC 20006
(202) 293-0090; Fax: (202) 293-1250
E-mail: dcoffice@nasadad.org

As Chief Executive Officer of the National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, Inc. (NASADAD), Mr. Gustafson represents State agencies that administer over $3.7 billion in Federal, State, and local dollars. NASADAD services include collection and analysis of data and research, training and technical assistance, and the transfer of technology and information to States. Mr. Gustafson is a proactive advocate for State alcohol and other disorders (AOD) programs. He has more than 28 years' experience in the prevention and treatment fields and has extensive knowledge of substance abuse-related issues such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, crime, and services to youth and special populations. He assisted communities in developing strategies to reduce the incidence of drug abuse, and he designed and directed a statewide network of intake units for diagnostic screening, evaluation, referral, and followup services. Mr. Gustafson was a liaison to the President's Special Office on Drug Abuse Prevention and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. He holds M.A. and B.A. degrees from the State University of New York at Albany.


Stephen T. Higgins, Ph.D.
Human Behavioral Pharmacology Lab, Department of Psychiatry
Ira Allen School
University of Vermont
38 Fletcher Place
Burlington, VT 05401-1419
(802) 660-3060; Fax: (802) 660-3064
E-mail: shiggins@pop.uvm.edu

Dr. Higgins earned his doctoral degree from the University of Kansas. He was a postdoctoral Fellow at Johns Hopkins and a staff Fellow at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Addiction Research Center from 1985 to 1986. In 1986, Dr. Higgins joined the faculty of the University of Vermont, where he is now a Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology. Dr. Higgins is currently Principal and co-Investigator on five NIDA grants. Dr. Higgins has received several scientific awards and has been published in more than 150 publications. Dr. Higgins' research is a blend of laboratory and treatment outcome research, with the goal of furthering basic scientific understanding of the behavioral and pharmacological processes involved in cocaine abuse. Dr. Higgins is President-elect of Division 28 of the American Psychological Association.


Martin Y. Iguchi, Ph.D.
RAND Drug Policy Research Center
PO Box 2138
1700 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
(310) 393-0411, ext. 7816; Fax: (310) 451-7004
E-mail: martin_Iguchi@rand.org

Dr. Iguchi is a Senior Behavioral Scientist and co-Director of the Drug Policy Research Center at RAND and Principal Investigator of two National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) treatment grants, one of which is entering its eighth year of funding. Dr. Iguchi is a member of the National Advisory Council for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, serves on the National Institutes of Health AIDS and Related Research Review Committee, served on NIDA's Clinical and Behavioral Research Review Committee, and is a former member of Philadelphia's HIV/AIDS Community Planning Group. Dr. Iguchi received his undergraduate degree in Liberal Arts from Vassar College and his master's and doctoral degrees in Experimental Psychology from Boston University. Dr. Iguchi also received 2 years of postdoctoral training in drug abuse and behavioral pharmacology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In 1997, Dr. Iguchi published 10 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters: crack cocaine use in the American Journal of Public Health, natural classes of treatment response and on reinforcing appropriate nondrug-using behaviors in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, and stages and processes of change as predictors of drug use in Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.


James A. Inciardi, Ph.D.
Center for Drug and Alcohol Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
University of Delaware
77 East Main Street
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-6286; Fax: (302) 831-1275
E-mail: james.inciardi@mvs.udel.edu

Dr. Inciardi is Director of the Center for Drug and Alcohol Studies and Professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at the University of Delaware; Adjunct Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Miami School of Medicine; a Distinguished Professor in the Núcleo de Estudos e Pesquisas em Atenćčo ao Uso do Drogas at the State University of Rio de Janeiro; and a Guest Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Dr. Inciardi has published 45 books and over 225 articles and chapters in the areas of substance abuse, criminology, criminal justice, history, folklore, public policy, AIDS, medicine, and law, and has extensive research, clinical, field, and teaching experience in both substance abuse and criminal justice. Dr. Inciardi received his doctoral degree in Sociology from New York University.


Linda P. Kaplan, CAE
National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors
1911 North Fort Myer Drive, Suite 900
Arlington, VA 22209
(703) 741-7686; Fax: (703) 741-7698
E-mail: naadac@internetmci.com

Ms. Kaplan has been Executive Director of the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) since 1990. She is a strong proponent of a model system for continuing the development of professional standards and a national certification program for treatment professionals. She has led the drive to enact State licensure laws for alcohol and drug counselors. Ms. Kaplan helped to develop and promote the national public education campaign, Treatment Works!, on the disease of addiction, the need for trained alcohol and drug counselors, and the many health and socioeconomic benefits of treatment. In 1992, Ms. Kaplan became a Certified Association Executive. She recently Chaired the Greater Washington Society of Association Executives Community Service Committee and has presented at many conferences on association management. Ms. Kaplan has served as Executive Director of the National Women's Political Caucus and as Associate Director of B'nai B'rith Women.


Herbert D. Kleber, M.D. Division on Substance Abuse
Columbia University
722 West 168th Street, Unit 66
New York, NY 10032
(212) 543-5570; Fax: (212) 543-6018
E-mail: hdk3@columbia.edu

Dr. Kleber is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Division on Substance Abuse at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric Institute and is Executive Vice President of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA). Between 1989 and 1991, Dr. Kleber was Deputy Director for Demand Reduction at the Office of National Drug Control Policy. During his tenure as Professor of Psychiatry at Yale, he was a pioneer in the research and treatment of narcotic and cocaine abuse for more than 30 years. Dr. Kleber has authored and coauthored more than 200 papers and books and was coeditor of the American Psychiatric Association Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment. He has received numerous awards, holds two honorary degrees, is on the editorial board of seven scientific journals, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine.


Thomas R. Kosten, M.D.
Veterans Administration Connecticut Healthcare System
Department of Psychiatry 116A
950 Campbell Avenue
West Haven, CT 06516
(203) 937-4914; Fax: (203) 937-4915
E-mail: kosten.thomas@west-haven.va.gov

Dr. Kosten is a Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine and Chief of Psychiatry at the Veterans Administration Connecticut Healthcare System. Dr. Kosten is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, where he is also on the Board for Added Qualifications in Addiction Psychiatry. He is a Fellow and past Director of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD), a Fellow in the American Psychiatric Association and American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP), and President of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP). Dr. Kosten's contributions to medications development for substance abuse led to the Cochin Award from CPDD and the Elkes International Award from ACNP. Dr. Kosten is an editor for the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, the American Journal on Addictions, and the American Journal of Psychiatry, and has contributed to more than 250 publications. Dr. Kosten trained at Cornell and Yale and has been supported by a Research Scientist Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).


Mary Jeanne Kreek, M.D., Ph.D.
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue
New York, NY 10021
(212) 327-8248; Fax: (212) 327-8547
E-mail: sudulj@rockvax.rockefeller.edu

Dr. Kreek is Professor and Head of The Laboratory on the Biology of Addictive Diseases at The Rockefeller University and Senior Physician at Rockefeller University Hospital. She is a Principal Investigator and Scientific Director of an NIH-NIDA Research Center—Treatment of Addictions: Biological Correlates. Dr. Kreek is presently working on research related to the molecular and clinical neurobiology as well as the biological correlates of the addictive diseases. Dr. Kreek was part of the original Rockefeller University Hospital team (with Professor Emeritus Vincent P. Dole and the late Dr. Marie Nyswander) that conducted the initial studies that led to the development of methadone maintenance treatment for heroin addiction. In collaboration with Dr. Don Des Jarlais, Dr. Kreek identified the problem of HIV infection and AIDS and the protective value of effective methadone maintenance treatment in parenteral drug abusers in New York, findings that were reported to the Centers for Disease Control in 1984. Dr. Kreek has also conducted and published numerous studies on the medical status of addicts in treatment and the changes in the status during short- and long-term treatment for addictions, as well as basic research studies of the molecular biological and neurochemical basis of addiction.


Dennis McCarty, Ph.D.
Substance Abuse Group, Institute for Health Policy
Heller Graduate School
Brandeis University
MS 035, Box 9110
415 South Street
Waltham, MA 02254-9110
(781) 736-3924; Fax: (781) 736-3928
E-mail: mccarty@binah.cc.brandeis.edu

Dr. McCarty is a Human Services Research Professor at the Institute for Health Policy located within Brandeis University's Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare. He directs the Brandeis/Harvard Research Center on Managed Care and Drug Abuse Treatment. Dr. McCarty collaborates with policymakers in State and Federal Governments and with community-based programs to conduct studies that examine the effects of managed care on the organization, financing, and delivery of substance abuse treatment services. Previously, Dr. McCarty served as Director of the Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Abuse Services for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. He was a coeditor of an Institute of Medicine report titled Managing Managed Care: Quality Improvement in Behavioral Health Care.


A. Thomas McLellan, Ph.D.
Center for Study of Addiction
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
1 Commerce Square, Suite 1120
2005 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103
(215) 665-2880; Fax: (215) 665-2892
E-mail: mclellan@research.trc.upenn.edu

Dr. McLellan is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and Senior Scientist at the Pennsylvania Veterans Administration (PENN/VA) Center for Studies of Addiction. He was educated at Colgate and Bryn Mawr Colleges in the United States and at Oxford University in Great Britain. He has worked at the University of Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia VA Medical Center for over 20 years. Dr. McLellan and his colleagues developed the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and the Treatment Services Review (TSR) and have used these instruments in over 150 experimental and field studies of various types of psychosocial, pharmacotherapy, and combined interventions in the treatment of substance abuse disorders. Dr. McLellan has been particularly interested in the measurement of treatment outcome and effectiveness and in the "matching" of particular types of treatments to specific types of patients.


Delinda Mercer, Ph.D. Department of Psychiatry
University of Pennsylvania
3600 Market Street, Room 783
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 662-2848; Fax: (215) 349-5171
E-mail: mercerd@landru.cpr.upenn.edu

Dr. Mercer has considerable experience in the fields of addiction research and treatment. She was instrumental in the development of the models of individual drug counseling and group drug counseling used in the Cocaine Collaborative Study, and she was primary author of manuals for each. In addition, she was the Project Director for the Cocaine Collaborative Study at the University of Pennsylvania site. Her research interests include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention in substance abusers, borderline personality disorder and substance abuse, and gender issues in substance abuse treatment. She has written a number of articles and book chapters on substance abuse treatment.


David S. Metzger, Ph.D.
Center for Studies of Addiction
University of Pennsylvania/Veterans Administration Medical Center
3900 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 823-6098; Fax: (215) 823-6080
E-mail: metzger@research.trc.upenn.edu

Dr. Metzger is Research Associate Professor and Director of the Opiate/AIDS Research Division at the University of Pennsylvania/Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center, Center for Studies of Addiction. Since 1989, he and colleagues from the Center have been conducting longitudinal studies of injecting drug users (IDUs) from Philadelphia. Their work has been examining the factors associated with changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors and incidence of HIV infection. Thus far, over 1,100 subjects have been enrolled in these studies, known collectively as the Risk Assessment Project (RAP). A primary objective of this work has been to provide valid and reliable data that can increase the understanding of the relationship between HIV risk behaviors and participation in substance abuse treatment.


William R. Miller, Ph.D.
Kaiser Permanente
Center for Health Research
3800 North Kaiser Center Drive
Portland, OR 97227-1098
(503) 335-6665; Fax: (503) 335-2424
E-mail: wrmiller@unm.edu

As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Miller's research career has focused on the development and evaluation of innovative treatment approaches for substance use disorders. He has been Director of Clinical Training at the University of New Mexico (UNM), founded a private practice, and directed New Mexico's largest public substance abuse treatment program in the era of managed care. Dr. Miller has received numerous awards for teaching and research, including the international Jellinek Memorial Award. With support by an NIH Senior Career Research Scientist Award, Dr. Miller is focusing fulltime on clinical research in substance abuse.

Dr. Miller is Regents Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico (UNM) and has directed both the treatment and research branches at the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions, UNM.


Charles P. O'Brien, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
University of Pennsylvania
3900 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6178
(215) 222-3200, ext. 132; Fax: (215) 386-6770
E-mail: obrien@research.trc.upenn.edu

Dr. O'Brien is a physician trained in neurology, neurophysiology, and psychiatry. In 1971, he founded a large treatment program for addicts in Philadelphia, and since 1980 he has directed the Psychiatry Department for the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. His research focus over the past 25 years has been on the basic mechanisms of addiction and the development of new treatments. Dr. O'Brien's team has discovered numerous new behavioral and pharmacological treatments that have resulted in significant improvements in the success rate for the treatment of addictive disorders.


Lisa S. Onken, Ph.D.
Treatment Research Branch, Division of Clinical and Services Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
6001 Executive Blvd
Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (301) 443-0107; Fax: (301) 443-8674
E-mail: lo10n@nih.gov

Dr. Onken is Associate Chief of the Treatment Research Branch at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). She directs NIDA's Behavioral Therapies Development Program and is co-Chair of the NIDA Treatment Initiative. Prior to joining NIDA, she conducted research on benzodiazepines, cognitive performance, and sleep at the Department of Behavioral Biology at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Dr. Onken received her doctoral degree from Northwestern University and is a licensed clinical psychologist.


Paula DeGraffenreid Riggs, M.D.
Department of Psychiatry
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
4200 East Ninth Avenue
Denver, CO 80262
(303) 315-7652; Fax: (303) 315-5641
E-mail: paula.riggs@uchsc.edu

Dr. Riggs is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (UCHSC) and Director of Psychiatric Services for Adolescents, Addiction Research, and Treatment Services at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. She is Board certified in Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry with added qualifications in addiction psychiatry. Dr. Riggs received a Scientist Development Award for Clinicians from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to develop new treatment for comorbid disorders in adolescents with substance dependence and conduct disorders.


Bruce J. Rounsaville, M.D.
Yale University
Connecticut Mental Health Center
34 Park Street
New Haven, CT 06519
(203) 789-7080, ext. 2; Fax: (203) 789-7088
E-mail: rounsavibj@maspo1.mas.yale.edu

Since he joined the Yale faculty in 1977, Dr. Rounsaville has focused his clinical research career on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with alcohol and drug dependence. Using modern methods for psychiatric diagnosis, Dr. Rounsaville was among the first to call attention to the high rates of dual diagnosis in drug abusers. As a member of the Work Group to Revise DSM-III, Dr. Rounsaville was a leader in the adoption of the drug dependence syndrome concept into the DSM-III-R Substance Use Disorders Section. Dr. Rounsaville has played a key role in clinical trials on the efficacy of a number of important treatments, including outpatient clonidine/naltrexone for opioid detoxification, naltrexone treatment for alcohol dependence, cognitive-behavioral treatment for cocaine dependence, and disulfiram treatment for alcoholic cocaine abusers.


Kathy Sanders-Phillips, Ph.D.
Department of Pediatrics
University of California, Los Angeles
Medical Center, Suite 403
111 North LaBrea
Inglewood, CA 90301
(310) 673-4130; Fax: (310) 673-5345

Dr. Sanders-Phillips, a developmental psychologist, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine. She has also served as a Senior Program Director with the UCLA School of Public Health, Division of Community Health Sciences, and is currently an Associate Member of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. She has conducted numerous studies in the area of drug abuse with particular emphasis on identifying social factors influencing drug use in minority populations. Much of her research has focused on health behaviors and health outcomes in low-income minority groups and the impact of violence on health behaviors such as drug use. She has published several papers on the psychosocial determinants of health behaviors and on community-based health interventions. In 1991, Dr. Sanders-Phillips was a University of California Wellness Lecture awardee for her work on exposure to violence and health behaviors in African American and Latino populations.

Dr. Sanders-Phillips serves as a member of the National Advisory Council for the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and was the former Chair of the University of California AIDS Taskforce. She was also a member of the NIDA Extramural Science Advisory Board.


Maxine L. Stitzer, Ph.D.
Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit
Bayview Medical Center
The Johns Hopkins University
5510 Nathan Shock Drive
Baltimore, MD 21224-6823
(410) 550-0042; Fax: (410) 550-0030
E-mail: mstitzer@welchlink.welch.jhu.edu

Dr. Stitzer received her doctoral degree in psychology and her training in psychopharmacology from the University of Michigan. Her extensive grant-supported research program focuses on both pharmacological and behavioral approaches to the treatment of substance abuse. Dr. Stitzer pioneered early research on use of contingency management techniques in treatment of drug abuse, and she continues to research this approach with both pharmacologically supported (methadone) and drug-free heroin abusers. Dr. Stitzer has served on National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Grant Review and Research Advisory Committees; she participated in development of an Institute of Medicine report on the availability and funding of drug abuse treatment in the United States; she helped in developing an American Psychological Association proficiency certification for psychologists in substance abuse treatment; and she served on the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD) Board of Directors.


José Szapocznik, Ph.D.
Spanish Family Guidance Center
Department of Psychiatry
University of Miami School of Medicine
1425 Northwest 10th Avenue, Suite 309
Miami, FL 33136
(305) 243-4592; Fax: (305) 243-5577
E-mail: jszapocz@mednet.med.miami.edu

Dr. Szapocznik is Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology and Director of the Center for Family Studies, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, at the University of Miami School of Medicine. He received his doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Miami. As Director of the Center for Family Studies, which has been successfully funded through competitive national grants since 1972, Dr. Szapocznik has been a pioneer in the national effort to prevent and treat adolescent drug abuse and other behavior problems, such as delinquency and violence, using a family-oriented approach. Dr. Szapocznik serves on the editorial boards of Psychotherapy Research, the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, the Journal of Family Psychology, and the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences. He has over 125 professional publications in his area of expertise. Dr. Szapocznik's work has received considerable national and international recognition. He is a frequent lecturer and consultant nationally and internationally.


Stephen R. Zukin, M.D.
Division of Clinical and Services Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
6001 Executive Blvd
Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (301) 443-6697; Fax: (301) 443-2317
E-mail: szukin@helix.nih.gov

Dr. Zukin is Director of the Division of Clinical and Services Research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and Chair of the NIDA Treatment Initiative. Previously, as Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, he conducted NIDA-funded research elucidating the actions of phencyclidine and related drugs in the nervous system, as well as clinical research on pharmacotherapies targeting excitatory amino acid receptors in the brain. He is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is Board certified in psychiatry. Dr. Zukin received the Kempf Fund Award for Research Development in Psychobiological Psychiatry from the American Psychiatric Association in 1992.


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