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Computational Models: Applications to Drug Abuse

May 30-31, 2000


The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is interested in developing and fostering a computational modeling program that can use new perspectives, models and paradigms to better understand drug abuse and addiction. NIDA sponsored a workshop held May 30-31, 2000 on "Computational Models: Applications to Drug Abuse," to explore how computational and theoretical modeling could be used in drug abuse research. Workshop participants included researchers studying the neurobiology and behavior of drug abuse and researchers using computational modeling techniques in a variety of other applications. The purpose of this meeting was to explore with experts in drug abuse research and in computational and theoretical modeling the needs, gaps and promising areas of research, and to begin a discussion of possible approaches NIDA could take to foster computational and theoretical approaches to drug abuse. In the course of the two-day meeting, the participants considered these broad issues and, at the same time, discussed some specific challenges and questions facing this potential and emerging field in their presentations and discussions. These questions included:

  1. Can we model our current knowledge related to substance abuse and addiction to gain additional insight into underlying neurobiological, cognitive and behavioral processes?

  2. What are the most promising areas of research that could benefit from a modeling approach in the near term?

  3. What additional cognitive, neurobiological and behavioral data would be useful for developing models of drug abuse and addiction?

  4. What existing models and computational techniques can be applied to substance abuse and addiction, and is there a need for substantial development of new techniques? For example, do we need new reinforcement models, and do we need additional dynamic models to accommodate drug effects on cellular homeostasis?

Conclusions

  1. The participants saw a great potential for collaborations that would apply computational methodology to problems of importance for a scientific understanding of drug abuse and addiction, such as neural modulation, cellular homeostasis, learning and memory, decision making and economics, and behavioral flexibility.

  2. Participants saw value, and application to drug abuse and addiction, in developing computational models at all levels of analysis from macro level economic and behavioral models through micro-level cellular regulation and homeostasis models.

  3. Both theoretical modeling approaches as well as those more integrated with experimental data were thought to be equally important for drug abuse research.

  4. The participants saw a particular need for pre- and post-doctoral training in computational approaches and the need to strongly support newly independent faculty trained to use and develop computational methods.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

WORKSHOP
Computational Models: Applications to Drug Abuse

May 30-31, 2000
PARTICIPANT LIST
Antoine Bechara, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Neurology
Department of Neurology
University of Iowa Health Care
200 Hawkins Drive
Iowa City, IA 52242
(319) 356-4913
(319) 356-4505 FAX
antoine-bechara@uiowa.edu
Regina M. Carelli, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor Department of Psychology
Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
CB 3270, Davie Hall
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3270
(919) 962-8775
(919) 962-2537 FAX
rcarelli@unc.edu
Gregory S. Berns, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences
Emory University School of Medicine
Suite 4000, 1639 Pierce Drive
Atlanta, GA 30322
(404) 727-2556
(404) 727-3233 FAX
gberns@emory.edu
Michael E. Hasselmo, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Psychology and Program in Experimental and Computational Neuroscience
Boston University
64 Cummington Street
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 353-1397
(617) 353-1424 FAX
hasselmo@bu.edu
Colin F. Camerer, Ph.D.
Axline Professor of Business Economics
Division of Humanities and Social Sciences
California Institute of Technology
M/C 228-77
Pasadena, CA 91125
(626) 395-4054
(626) 432-1726 FAX
camerer@hss.caltech.edu
Gene M. Heyman, Ph.D.
Research Psychologist
Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Laboratory
McLean Hospital
Harvard University Medical School
East House III
Belmont, MA 02478
(617) 855-2719
(617) 855-3711 FAX
gmheyman@mclean.harvard.edu
Steven Hursh, Ph.D.
Program Manager for Biomedical Modeling Science
Applications International Corp.
Adjunct Professor
Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine
Suite 301, 626 Towne Center Drive
Joppa, MD 21085
(410) 538-2901
(410) 679-9800 FAX
hurshs@saic.com
Eve E. Marder, Ph.D.
Professor of Neuroscience
Volen Center
Brandeis University
Waltham, MA 02454
(781) 736-3140
(781) 736-3142 FAX
marder@brandeis.edu
Julie A. Kauer, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Neurobiology
Duke University Medical Center
Box 3209
Durham, NC 27710
(919) 681-6168
(919) 684-4431 FAX
juliek@neuro.duke.edu
James L. McClelland, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology and Computer Science
Codirector of CNBC
Carnegie Mellon University
115 Mellon Institute
4400 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
(412) 268-3157
(412) 268-5060 FAX
mcclelland@cmu.edu
Eugene A. Kiyatkin, M.D., Ph.D.
Senior Research Fellow
Cellular Neurophysiology
Behavioral Neuroscience Branch
Intramural Research Program
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
5500 Nathan Shock Drive
Baltimore, MD 21224
(410) 550-5551
(410) 550-5553 FAX
ekiyatki@intra.nida.nih.gov
P. Read Montague, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Division of Neuroscience
Baylor College of Medicine
1 Baylor Plaza
Houston, TX 77030
(713) 798-3134
(713) 798-3946 FAX
read@bcm.tmc.edu
Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D.
Director
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
Room 5274, MSC 9581
6001 Executive Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892-9581
(301) 443-6480
(301) 443-9127 FAX
al16m@nih.gov
Steven R. Quartz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences
California Institute of Technology
228-77
Pasadena, CA 91125
(626) 395-4401
(626) 793-8580 FAX
steve@hss.caltech.edu
Jeremy K. Seamans, Ph.D.
Research Associate
Computational Neurobiology Laboratories
The Salk Institute
10010 North Torrey Pines Road
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858) 453-4100, ext. 1148
(858) 587-0417 FAX
jeremy@salk.edu
Nora D. Volkow, M.D.
Associate Laboratory Director for Life Sciences
Medical Department
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Building 490 30 Bell Avenue
Upton, NY 11973-5000
(631) 344-3335
(631) 344-5260 FAX
volkow@bnl.gov
David Shurtleff, Ph.D.
Acting Deputy Director
Division of Neuroscience and Behavioral Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
Room 4282, MSC 9555
6001 Executive Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892-9555
(301) 443-1887
(301) 594-6043 FAX
ds17la@nih.gov
Susan F. Volman, Ph.D.
Program Director
Behavioral Neurobiology Research Branch
Division of Neuroscience and Behavioral Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
Room 4282, MSC 9555
6001 Executive Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892-9555
(301) 435-1315
(301) 594-6043 FAX
susan_volman@nih.gov
Karen J. Skinner, Ph.D.
Acting Director
Division of Neuroscience and Behavioral Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
Room 4282, MS 9555 6001
Executive Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892-9555
(301) 443-1887
(301) 594-6043 FAX
ks79x@nih.gov
Rudy E. Vuchinich, Ph.D.
Professor
Department of Psychology
Auburn University
Auburn, AL 36849
(334) 844-6493
(334) 844-4447 FAX
vuchire@mail.auburn.edu
Herbert Weingartner, Ph.D.
Health Scientist Administrator
Behavioral Sciences Research Branch
Division of Neuroscience and Behavioral Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institutes of Health
Room 4282, MSC 9555
6001 Executive Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892-9555
(301) 443-6036
(301) 594-6043 FAX
herbw@nih.gov
Francis J. White, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair
Chicago Medical School
Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
Finch University of Health Sciences
3333 Green Bay Road
North Chicago, IL 60064-3095
(847) 578-3270
(847) 578-3268 FAX
whitef@mis.finchcms.edu
R. Mark Wightman, Ph.D.
W.R. Kenan Jr. Professor
Department of Chemistry
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
CB 3290, Venable
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290
(919) 962-1472
(919) 962-2388 FAX
rmw@unc.edu



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