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References

9
  1. Rice DP. Economic Costs of Substance Abuse, 1995. Proc Assoc Am Phys 111(2): 119-125, 1999.
  2. Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). The Economic Costs of Drug Abuse in the United States 1992-1998. NCJ-190636, 2001.
  3. Harwood H. Updating Estimates of the Economic Costs of Alcohol Abuse in the United States: Estimates, Update Methods, and Data. Report prepared by The Lewin Group for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2000. Based on estimates, analyses, and data reported in Harwood H, Fountain D, and Livermore G. The Economic Costs of Alcohol and Drug Abuse in the United States, 1992. Report prepared for the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, NIH Publication No. 98-4327, Rockville, MD, National Institutes of Health, 1998.
  4. American Diabetes Association. Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S. in 2002, Diabetes Care 26: 917-932, 2003.
  5. American Cancer Society. Cancer Costs: Cancer Facts and Figures, 2003.
  6. Harvard School of Public Health/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation survey conducted by telephone by International Communications Research, with 1,012 adults 18 years and older, nationwide between August 7 and August 21, 2000. The margin of error was plus or minus 3 percentage points.
  7. McGinnis JM, and Foege WH. Mortality and morbidity attributable to use of addictive substances in the United States. Proc Assoc Am Phys 111(2): 109-118, 1999.
  8. Ockene IS, and Miller NH. Cigarette Smoking, Cardiovascular Disease, and Stroke. Circulation 96:3243-3247, 1997.
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Drug-Associated HIV Transmission Continues in the United States, 2002, available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/.
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Viral Hepatitis C Fact Sheet, 2004, available at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/hepatitis/c/fact.htm.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report 2002;14:30, also available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/stats/hasrlink.htm.
  12. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Drug Impaired Driving. Available at http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/outreach/safesobr/15qp/web/iddrug.html, 1997.
  13. Institute for Health Policy, ed. Workplace burden, In: Substance abuse: The nation’s number one health problem, Key indicators for policy, Princeton, NJ, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, pp. 44-45, 1993.
  14. National Institute on Drug Abuse. NIDA Probes the Elusive Link Between Child Abuse and Later Drug Abuse. Available at /NIDA_Notes/NNVol13N2/DirrepVol13N2.html, 1998.
  15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics Report. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr49/nvsr49_12.pdf, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tobacco Information and Prevention Source, Available at http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/, 2003.
  16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics Report. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr49/nvsr49_12.pdf, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tobacco Information and Prevention Source, Available at http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/, 2003.
  17. Mick E, Biederman J, Faraone SV, Sayer J, and Kleinman S. Case-control study of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and maternal smoking, alcohol use, and drug use during pregnancy. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 41(4):378-385, 2002.
  18. Wakschlag LS, Pickett KE, Cook E Jr, Benowitz NL, Leventhal BL. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and severe antisocial behavior in offspring: a review. Am J Public Health 92(6):966-974, 2002.
  19. Toschke AM, Montgomery SM, Pfeiffer U, von Kries R. Early intrauterine exposure to tobaccoinhaled products and obesity. Am J Epidemiol 158(11):1068-1074, 2003.
  20. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Pregnancy and Health Survey: Drug Use Among Women Delivering Livebirths: 1992 (National Institutes of Health, Publication No. 96-3819, NIH, Rockville, MD, 1996).
  21. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, Protecting Children in Substance Abusing Families, 1994.
  22. Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). Homelessness and drug abuse in The National Drug Control Strategy 2000 Annual Report.
  23. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA). Behind bars: Substance abuse and America's prison population, New York, CASA, 1998.
  24. Lester B. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and 7-Year Outcome: IQ and Special Education, Presentation at the Society for Pediatric Research Meeting, Washington, DC, 2003.
  25. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Office of Applied Studies, An Analysis of Worker Drug Use and Workplace Policies and Programs: Results from the NHSDA, 27, 1994 and 1997.

Faces of Addiction

  1. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Overview of Findings from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (Office of Applied Studies, NHSDA Series H-24, DHHS Publication No. SMA 04-3963), Rockville, MD, 2004.

Trends in Drug Abuse

  1. Johnston LD, O’Malley PM, and Bachman JG. Monitoring the Future: National Survey Results on Drug Use, Overview of Key Findings. (In Press.) Bethesda, MD, National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2004. Available at: www.monitoringthefuture.org.
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Overview of Findings from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (Office of Applied Studies, NHSDA Series H-24, DHHS Publication No. SMA 04-3963), Rockville, MD, 2004.

Addiction is a Chronic Disease

  1. McLellan AT, Lewis DC, O’Brien CP, and Kleber HD. Drug dependence, a chronic medical illness: Implications for treatment, insurance, and outcomes evaluation. JAMA 284(13):1689-1695, 2000.

Treatment Can Work

  1. Hubbard RL, Craddock SG, Flynn PM, Anderson J, and Etheridge RM. Overview of 1-year followup outcomes in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Study (DATOS). Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 11(4): 261-278, 1997.
  2. Jainchill N. Substance dependency treatment for adolescents: practice and research, Subst Use Misuse, Oct-Dec, 35(12-14): 2031-60, 2000.
  3. Hser YI, Grella CE, Hubbard RL, Hsieh SC, Fletcher BW, Brown BS, Anglin MD. (2001). An evaluation of drug treatments for adolescents in 4 US cities. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 58(7):689-95.
  4. Ling W, Charuvastra C, Collins JF, Batki S, Brown LS, Kintaudi P, Wesson DR, McNicholas L, Tusel DJ, Malkerneker U, Renner JA, Santos E, Casadonte P, Fye C, Stine S, Wang RI, and Segal D. Buprenorphine maintenance treatment of opiate dependence: a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Addiction 93(4): 475-86, 1998.
  5. Inciardi JA, Surratt HL, Martin SS, and Hooper RM. The importance of aftercare in a correctionsbased treatment continuum. In C.G. Leukefeld, F. Tims, & D. Farabee (Eds.), Treatment of Drug Offenders: Policies and Issues. New York: Springer Publishing Co., pp. 204-216, 2002.
  6. McLellan T. Have We Evaluated Addiction Treatment Correctly? Implications from a Chronic Care Perspective. Addiction 97: 249-252, 2002.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS Surveillance - General Epidemiology L178 Slide Series (through 2001). Available at : http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/graphics/surveill.htm, 2002.
  8. Metzger DS, Woody GE, McLellan AT, O'Brien CP, Druley P, Navaline H, De Philipps D, Stolley P, and Abrutyn E. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion among intravenous drug users inand out-of-treatment: An 18-month prospective follow-up. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 6, 1049-1056, 1993.
  9. Volkow ND, Chang L, Wang GJ, Fowler JS, Franceschi D, Sedler M, Gatley SJ, Miller E, Hitzemann R, Ding YS, and Logan J. Loss of dopamine transporters in methamphetamine abusers recovers with protracted abstinence. J Neurosci 21(23): 9414-9418, 2001.

Prevention Can Work

  1. Goldberg L, Elliot D, Clarke GN, MacKinnon DP, Moe E, Zoref L, Green C, Wolf SL, Greffrath E, Miller DJ, and Lapin A. Effects of a multidimensional anabolic steroid prevention intervention. The Adolescents Training and Learning to Avoid Steroids (ATLAS) Program, JAMA 276(19):1555- 1562, 1996.
  2. Lonczak HS, Abbott RD, Hawkins JD, Kosterman R, and Catalano RF. Effects of the Seattle social development project on sexual behavior, pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted disease outcomes by age 21 years. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 156(5):438-447, 2002.
  3. Ellickson PL, McCaffrey DF,.Ghosh-Dastidar B and Longshore DL. New Inroads in Preventing Adolescent Drug Use: Results from a Large-Scale Trial of Project ALERT in Middle Schools. American Journal of Public Health 93:1830-1839, 2003.
  4. Palmgreen P, Donohew L, Lorch EP, Hoyle RH, Stephenson MT. 2001. Television campaigns and adolescent marijuana use: tests of sensation seeking targeting. Am J Public Health. 91(2):292-6.
  5. Johnston LD, O’Malley PM, and Bachman JG. Monitoring the Future: National Survey Results on Drug Use, Overview of Key Findings (In Press.) Bethesda, MD, National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2004. Available at: www.monitoringthefuture.org.

Stigma of Drug Abuse

  1. Institute of Medicine. "The Development of Medications for the Treatment of Opiate and Cocaine Addictions: Issues for the Government and Private Sector" National Academy Press, Washington D.C., 1995.



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