Skip Navigation

Link to  the National Institutes of Health  
The Science of Drug Abuse and Addiction from the National Institute on Drug Abuse Archives of the National Institute on Drug Abuse web site
Go to the Home page
   

NIDA Home > Publications > Director's Reports > September, 2010 Index    

Director's Report to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse - September, 2010



Program Activities

New NIDA PAs and RFAs

On April 20, 2010, NIDA issued a PAR entitled NIDA Research Education Program for Clinical Researchers and Clinicians (R25) (PAR-10-173). This PAR is a reissuance of PAR-07-221. This research education program is clinically-focused, designed to foster the development of clinical researchers, and/or train clinicians to be sophisticated consumers of research to evaluate and apply research-based findings in their practice. Participants must be in a clinically focused career, which includes health services research, at the following levels of professional career development: undergraduate (see Notice NOT-DA-10-022), medical/graduate student, postdoctoral fellow, medical resident, and/or independent scientist. This mechanism may not be used for support of non-research related clinical training.

On April 27, 2010, NIDA issued a PAR entitled NIDA Mentored Clinical Scientists Development Program Award in Drug Abuse and Addiction (K12) (PAR-10-177). This institutional career development award program is designed to support career development experiences for clinical investigators (scholars) leading to research independence in the area of drug abuse and addiction. Candidates selected for support as scholars must hold a clinical or research doctorate. Under this award, scholars will be supported for 3-5 years of consecutive 12-month appointments and are strongly encouraged to apply for independent research grant support during the award period.

On June 22, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled NIDA Core "Center of Excellence" Grant Program (P30) (PAR-10-220). NIDA Core Center of Excellence Grants (P30) are intended to bring together investigators currently funded by NIH or other Federal or non-Federal sources, to enhance the effectiveness of existing research and also to extend the focus of research to drug abuse and addiction. It is expected that a Center will transform knowledge in the sciences it is studying. Incremental work should not be the focus of Center activities; rather, new and creative directions are required. A P30 should integrate and promote research in existing funded projects, to achieve new and creative directions. It is expected that individual core activities reflect a relationship to the integrating theme of the Center and the Center is expected to support the education, training, and mentoring of new investigators, and share findings, data and their resources. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 27, 2010, August 25, 2011, August 25, 2012. Application Submission Dates(s): October 27, 2010, September 25, 2011, September 25, 2012.

On July 9, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award (R25) (PAR-10-227). This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages Science Education (R25) grant applications to fund the development and evaluation of innovative model programs and materials for enhancing knowledge and understanding of neuroscience and the neurobiological mechanisms of drug abuse and addiction among K-12 students, the general public, health care practitioners, museums, media experts, and other educational groups. The award provides support for the formation of partnerships between scientists and educators, media experts, community leaders, and other interested organizations for the development and evaluation of programs and materials that will enhance knowledge and understanding of science related to drug abuse. The intended focus is on topics not well addressed in existing efforts by educational, community, or media activities.

On August 3, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled NIDA Program Project Grant Applications (P01) (PAR-10-244). This FOA is to provide support for applications from institutions/organizations that propose broadly based investigative efforts with a well defined central focus or object to address critical issues in drug abuse and addiction involving neuroscience, behavior, prevention, treatment, epidemiology, etiology, health services, HIV/AIDS or other drug abuse-related research areas.

On August 20, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Neuroscience Research on Drug Abuse (R01) (PA-10-268). This FOA encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that are relevant to the understanding of the process(es) and mechanisms underlying drug abuse and addiction, including use, dependence, addiction, withdrawal, and treatment, and may be conducted using model systems, animals, and/or humans.

On August 20, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Neuroscience Research on Drug Abuse (R21) (PA-10-269). This FOA encourages research grant applications from institutions/ organizations that are relevant to the understanding of the process(es) and mechanisms underlying drug abuse and addiction, including use, dependence, addiction. This research may be conducted using model systems, animals, and/or humans. The Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) mechanism is intended to encourage exploratory and developmental research projects by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

On August 20, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Neuroscience Research on Drug Abuse (R03) (PA-10-270). This FOA encourages research grant R03 applications from institutions/ organizations that are relevant to the understanding of the process(es) and mechanisms underlying drug abuse and addiction. The R03 grant mechanism supports different types of projects including pilot and feasibility studies; secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; and development of new research technology. The R03 is intended to support small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources. Preliminary data are not required for an R03.

On August 26, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Early Career Award in Chemistry of Drug Abuse and Addiction (ECHEM) -- NIDA (R21/R33) (PAS-10-274). Through the issuance of this program announcement, with set aside funds (PAS), NIDA invites Phased Innovation (R21/R33) grant applications from new-to-NIH investigators into basic chemistry research applied to drug abuse and addiction. NIDA invites newly independent investigators and investigators who have not had previous NIH funding to submit applications for research projects related to NIDA's mission.

On August 26, 2010, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Pharmacological Development of Treatment Agents and Formulations for Tobacco Dependence (STTR [R41]) (RFA-DA-11-004). The goal of this FOA is to facilitate the development of new, more effective treatments for tobacco dependence. Opening Date: December 13, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): December 13, 2010; Application Due Date(s): January 13, 2011.

PAs/RFAs Issued with Other NIH Components/Agencies

On May 21, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components issued a Program Announcement (PA) entitled NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research Competitive Revisions for Studies Focused on Neuropathic Pain or Neural Plasticity to Promote Collaborative Pain Research (R01) (PAR-10-204). This FOA is issued as an initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research. The Neuroscience Blueprint is a collaborative framework through which 16 NIH Institutes, Centers and Offices jointly support neuroscience-related research, with the aim of accelerating discoveries and reducing the burden of nervous system disorders (for further information, see http://neuroscienceblueprint. nih.gov/). The goal of this FOA is to facilitate the partnering of pain scientists and non-pain neuroscientists from the field of neural plasticity to capture insights and expertise from disciplines where transitions from health to disease have been extensively examined. An expected outcome of this FOA will be the formation of partnerships between pain researchers and non-pain neuroscientists to develop new collaborations focused on understanding the maladaptive neuroplastic changes that occur during the transition from acute to chronic pain. It is anticipated that these initial collaborations will lead to new applications for highly innovative projects centered on similar studies of the transition from acute to chronic pain. The purpose of this FOA is to encourage the submission of competitive revision applications that propose a collaborative, one year pilot study or a new specific aim associated with an active NIH grant. The parent grant may be focused on pain or on neural plasticity outside the area of pain. This FOA will utilize the Competitive Revision grant mechanism for R01 applications. Opening Date for this PA: August 28, 2010; Application Due Date(s): September 28, 2010; September 28, 2011; September 28, 2012.

On June 10, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Development of Assays for High-Throughput Screening for use in Probe and Pre-therapeutic Discovery (R01) (PA-10-213). This FOA encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose the development of assays for high throughput screening (HTS) relevant to processes and diseases specific to its mission with the intent of using them to screen for small molecule compounds that show desired properties as probes for use in advancing knowledge about the relevant target, identifying new targets, or serving as pre-therapeutic leads. The NIH launched a Molecular Libraries and Imaging initiative as part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research to establish a network of HTS screening centers which provide access to a large compound library, robotics to carry out the assays, and informatics to interpret the results (http://mli.nih.gov/mli/). This FOA seeks to establish a stream of scientifically and technologically outstanding assays for screening by these and other academic centers. Assays may involve targets indirectly related to disease, but which might provide insight into the biology of relevant diseases. Other targets might be associated with rare and neglected diseases, an area of increasing focus for the NIH (http://www.nih.gov/news/health/may2009/nhgri-20.htm). Assays should be relevant to the scope of the research for at least one of the sponsoring NIH Institutes.

On June 18, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with several other NIH components, issued a PA entitled PHASE II IICOHRTA AIDS/TB Research Training Program (U2R) (PAR-10-218). This FOA encourages renewal and new applications in the Phase II International Implementation, Clinical, Operations and Health Services Research Training Award for AIDS and TB (IICOHRTA AIDS/TB) program. Applications must propose, in an integrated manner, a collaborative research training program that will strengthen the capacity of institutions in low-and middle-income countries (LMIC), defined by the World Bank classification system, to conduct HIV and/or tuberculosis implementation research. Opening Date: July 16, 2010; Letters of Intent Submission Date(s): July 16, 2010; July 16, 2011; July 16, 2012; Application Due Date(s): August 16, 2010; August 16, 2011; August 16, 2012.

On June 18, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled AIDS International Training and Research Program (AITRP) (D43) (PAR-10-219). This FOA encourages renewal and new applications in the AIDS International Training and Research Program (AITRP). The application must propose a collaborative research training program that will strengthen the capacity of institutions in low-and middle-income countries (LMIC), defined by the World Bank classification system, to conduct HIV-related research. Opening Date: July 16, 2010;Letters of Intent Submission Date(s): July 16, 2010; July 16, 2011; July 16, 2012; Application Due Date(s): August 16, 2010; August 16, 2011; August 16, 2012.

On July 1, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Advancing Novel Science in Women's Health Research (ANSWHR) (R21) (PAS-10-226). The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), issued by the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) and co-sponsoring NIH institutes and centers (ICs), is to promote innovative, interdisciplinary research that will advance new concepts in women's health research and the study of sex/gender differences. Recent research reports have established the importance of studying issues specific to women, including the scientific and clinical importance of analyzing data separately for females and males. ORWH is particularly interested in encouraging extramural investigators to undertake new interdisciplinary research to advance studies on how sex and gender factors affect women's health; however, applications in all areas of women's health and/or sex/gender research are invited. Opening Date: September 16, 2010; Application Due Dates: October 16, 2010; October 16, 2011, October 16, 2012 for new applications; November 16, 2010; November 16, 2011; November 16, 2012 for resubmission applications.

On July 9, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Structural Biology of Membrane Proteins (R01) (PA-10-228). This FOA encourages grant applications from institutions/organizations that propose to develop research and methods to enhance the rate of membrane protein structure determination and to determine specific membrane protein structures. Innovative methods for expression, oligomerization, solubilization, stabilization, purification, characterization, crystallization, isotopic labeling, and structure determination of unique and biologically significant membrane proteins by x-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and other biophysical techniques are encouraged. Projects that will lead in the near term to determining the structures of biologically important membrane proteins are also encouraged. Responding to this FOA, rather than the regular investigator-initiated Research Project Grant (R01) FOA, will help NIH staff track interest and progress of research in this scientific area.

On July 21, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Bioengineering Research Partnerships (BRP)(R01) (PAR-10-234). Through this FOA, participating Institutes and Centers (ICs) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) invite applications for R01 awards to support Bioengineering Research Partnerships (BRPs) for basic, applied, and translational multi-disciplinary research that addresses important biological, clinical or biomedical research problems. In the context of this program, a partnership is a multi-disciplinary research team, that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and/or methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, or treat disease or to understand health and behavior. The partnership must operate according to a clear leadership plan and include appropriate bioengineering or allied quantitative sciences in combination with biomedical and/or clinical components. BRPs may propose, within a 12-page research strategy section, design-directed, developmental, discovery-driven, or hypothesis-driven research at universities, national laboratories, medical schools, large or small businesses, or other public and private entities or combinations of these entities, and will be evaluated against expanded review criteria. It is expected that a BRP will have a well-defined goal or deliverable that will be achieved in a 5-10 year timeframe based on objective milestones specified in the initial application.

On August 10, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Chronic, Non-Communicable Diseases and Disorders Across the Lifespan: Fogarty International Research Training Award (NCD-LIFESPAN) (D43) (PAR-10-257). This FOA encourages applications for the Chronic, Non-Communicable Diseases and Disorders Across the Lifespan: Fogarty International Research Training Award (NCD-LIFESPAN) D43 program for collaborative research training between institutions in the U.S. and low-and middle-income countries (LMIC), defined by the World Bank classification system. The proposed institutional research training program is expected to sustainably strengthen the research capacity of the LMIC institutions, and to train in-country experts to conduct research on chronic, non-communicable diseases and disorders across the lifespan, with the ultimate goal of implementing evidence-based interventions relevant to their countries. Opening Date: October 2, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): October 2, 2010, August 21, 2011, August 21, 2012; Application Due Date(s): November 2, 2010, September 21, 2011; September 21, 2012.

On July 9, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with NIGMS and other NIH institutes, issued a PA entitled Structural Biology of Membrane Proteins (R01) (PA-10-228). NIH invites applications proposing to enhance the availability of three dimensional structures of relevant membrane proteins by analytical and biophysical methods.

On May 18, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with a number of other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled U.S.-India Bilateral Collaborative Research Partnerships (CRP) on the Prevention of HIV/AIDS and Co-morbidities (R21) (RFA-AI-10-022). This FOA solicits Exploratory/Developmental (R21) applications from United States (U.S.)-funded institutions with an Indian-institution partner to establish Collaborative Research Partnerships (CRP) in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention or in preventing, treating, or ameliorating HIV-related co-morbidities such as malignancies, metabolic complications or opportunistic infections (OIs). The U.S.-India Bilateral CRP Program is designed to develop collaborations between scientists and institutions in the U.S. and India to conduct high quality HIV/AIDS prevention research of mutual interest and benefit to both countries while developing the basis for future institutional and individual scientific collaborations. This FOA will utilize the research capacities of the institutions and scientists in both countries to advance the field of HIV/AIDS prevention and to develop preliminary data that may support a more extensive future research proposal to test an HIV/AIDS prevention program. Opening date for this RFA: July 2, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date: July 2, 2010; Application due date: August 3, 2010.

On June 10, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with NIMH, issued an RFA entitled Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain: Addressing HIV among Vulnerable Populations (R01) (RFA-DA-11-001). This FOA solicits R01 applications for both domestic and international studies that test the seek, test, treat, and retain paradigm. This paradigm predicts that expanding HIV testing and reducing viral load among HIV+ individuals through HAART therapy can be effective in reducing the HIV transmission at a population level. In particular, this FOA focuses on research on expanding HAART therapy coverage to reduce HIV transmission among high-risk, vulnerable populations. Opening Date for this RFA: October 15, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): October 15, 2010; Application Due Date(s): November 15, 2010.

On July 7, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Epigenomics of Human Health and Disease (R01) (RFA-ES-10-002). This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) invites applications proposing highly innovative research that will investigate the epigenetic basis of human diseases. These studies will discover and define epigenetic marks or features and their possible interactions in cells and tissues that are representative of various human disease states, conditions or processes. Studies may also investigate the mechanism by which epigenetic changes occur in diseased or otherwise compromised states, and how these changes result in phenotypic differences. Letters of Intent Receipt Date: August 29, 2010; Application Due Date: September 29, 2010.

On August 3, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components issued an RFA entitled Effects of the Social Environment on Health: Measurement, Methods and Mechanisms (R01) (RFA-DA-11-003). This FOA, issued as part of the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet), solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate structural, behavioral, sociocultural, environmental, cognitive, emotional, and/or biological mechanisms through which the social environment affects health outcomes. To address this objective, applicants should propose research studies that will: (1) deepen our understanding of which aspects of social environments affect health outcomes for women and men at different stages of the lifecourse and in different social, economic, geographic, racial and ethnic sub-populations; (2) lead to a clearer understanding of mechanisms through which social environments have such effects; or (3) improve measurement methods and/or contribute to advances in analytic methods used in the study of social environments and health. Opening Date: December 6, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): December 6, 2010; Application Due Date(s): January 6, 2011.

On August 5, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Sleep and Social Environment: Basic Biopsychosocial Processes (R01) (RFA-HD-11-101). This FOA issued by the Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Opportunity Network (OppNet), National Institutes of Health, solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate the reciprocal interactions of the processes of sleep and circadian regulation and function with behavioral and social environment processes. Sleep is a complex biological phenomenon that is essential to normal behavioral and social functioning, as well as optimal health. In spite of its vital nature, the mechanisms by which social environment factors affect sleep behavior patterns have not been studied systematically, especially within the contexts of individual vulnerabilities and resilience. There is a need for greater understanding of the dynamic relationships between behavioral and social environment factors on the one hand and the basic mechanisms of sleep-wake and circadian regulation and function on the other. This FOA is not intended to support research on or development of treatments or interventions for disorders of sleep or circadian rhythms. Opening Date: September 8, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 8, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 8, 2010.

On August 5, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Sleep and Social Environment: Basic Biopsychosocial Processes (R21) (RFA-HD-11-102). This FOA issued by the Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Opportunity Network (OppNet), National Institutes of Health, solicits Research Project Grant (R21) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate the reciprocal interactions of the processes of sleep and circadian regulation and function with behavioral and social environment processes. Sleep is a complex biological phenomenon that is essential to normal behavioral and social functioning, as well as optimal health. In spite of its vital nature, the mechanisms by which social environment factors affect sleep behavior patterns have not been studied systematically, especially within the context of individual vulnerabilities and resilience. There is a need for greater understanding of the dynamic relationships between behavioral and social environment factors on the one hand and the basic mechanisms of sleep-wake and circadian regulation and function on the other. This FOA is not intended to support research on or development of treatments or interventions for disorders of sleep or circadian rhythms. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 8, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 8, 2010.

On August 10, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Basic Research on Self-Regulation (R21) (RFA-AG-11-010). This FOA issued by the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet) solicits exploratory/developmental (R21) research applications examining basic mechanisms of self-regulation. The intent of this FOA is to advance research on basic processes and mechanisms of self-regulation, capitalizing on recent advances in methods and theory from the psychological (social, personality, developmental), economic, neuroscience, sociocultural, and other behavioral and social science literatures. The current lack of consistency and conceptual integration in how self-regulation is studied across a range of disciplines hinders our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying many important health and developmental outcomes. Applications submitted to this FOA are expected to address one or more of the following basic behavioral and social science research (b-BSSR) challenges: (1) to precisely identify and operationally reconcile the basic processes and mechanisms involved in self-regulation of cognition, emotion, and behavior, and refine their measurement and theoretical conceptualizations, (2) to assess relations among various self-regulatory functions and their sub-components, and (3) to systematically characterize changes in self-regulatory functions over time, across different social and environmental contexts, and across the lifespan in both men and women. Proposals are expected to engage investigators working at multiple levels of analysis and across disparate literatures. Letters of Intent Receipt Date: December 6, 2010; Application Due Date: January 6, 2011.

On August 13, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with a number of other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Validation and Field Testing of New Tools for Characterizing the Personal Environment (R01) (RFA-ES-10-007). This FOA solicits applications to conduct field testing and initial validation of existing prototype tools for characterizing the personal environment including chemical exposures, diet, physical activity, psychosocial stress and the use of addictive substances. Applicants must have a functional prototype which has been validated under controlled (i.e., laboratory) conditions and partner with an ongoing human subjects research study with existing reference measures to assess the validity and usability of the prototype as well as the additional scientific impact of the exposure metric. Limited support for device refinement and expansion of the study cohort is allowable but not the focus of this FOA. Opening Date: September 21, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 21, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 21, 2010.

On August 13, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with NIAAA and NIEHS, issued an RFA entitled Validation and Field Testing of Novel Biomarkers of Response to Environmental Stressors (R01) (RFA-ES-10-008). This FOA solicits grant applications from institutions/ organizations to conduct pilot testing of novel candidate biomarkers and technologies that measure biological responses to chemical toxicants and other environmental stressors. Through collaborations with existing human population studies, investigators will conduct a rigorous evaluation of the performance of novel biomarkers and technologies under a range of exposure levels and collection and storage conditions, to establish the potential and feasibility of applying these novel approaches to large-scale epidemiology and gene-environment studies. Applicants will be expected to describe characteristics of their candidate biomarkers or technologies (e.g., laboratory validation studies, limits of detection, and preliminary data from discovery cohort studies) that demonstrate their suitability for further pilot testing. The goal of this 2-year program is to assess the performance (including testing for sensitivity, specificity, reliability and reproducibility) of these novel approaches in independent cohorts. The emphasis of this FOA is the validation of promising biomarkers and technologies; projects to discover and develop new technology and biomarkers of response are not appropriate to this solicitation and will be returned as nonresponsive. Opening Date: September 21, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 21, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 21, 2010.

On August 17, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with a number of other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Exceptional, Unconventional Research Enabling Knowledge Acceleration (EUREKA) (R01) (RFA-GM-11-003). This FOA solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations proposing exceptionally innovative research on novel hypotheses or difficult problems, solutions to which would have an extremely high impact on biomedical or biobehavioral research that is germane to the mission of one or more of the participating NIH Institutes. This FOA is for support of new projects, not continuation of projects that have already been initiated. It does not support pilot projects, i.e., projects of limited scope that are designed primarily to generate data that will enable the PD/PI to seek other funding. Opening Date: September 21, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 21, 2010.

On August 17, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Psychosocial Stress and Behavior: Integration of Behavioral and Physiological Processes (R01) (RFA-HL-11-033). This FOA issued by the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet) solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions and organizations that propose to investigate the mechanistic pathways linking psychosocial stressors and behavior. This research will facilitate investigation of multiple and potentially bidirectional pathways underlying the link between psychosocial stressors and behaviors that may ultimately impact biological function, health, and disease. Applicants are encouraged to use model systems and longitudinal approaches to design innovative and integrative studies to elucidate how psychological factors, social factors, and environments impact the processes by which stressors are coupled with and influenced by various behaviors. Applications examining moderating factors such as individual demographic (age, gender/sex, ethnicity) and psychological (vulnerabilities, resilience) differences, risk factors, early exposure, and environments (including toxicants) are desirable. This research will provide a deeper understanding of the psychological, environmental, and social processes that ultimately connect psychosocial stress to behaviors, physiological processes, health, and disease. Opening Date: September 14, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 14, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 14, 2010.

On August 17, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Development of Comprehensive and Conceptually-based Measures of Psychosocial Stress (R21) (RFA-HL-11-034). This FOA issued by the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet) solicits Research Project Grant (R21) applications from institutions and organizations that propose to develop and test conceptually-based and comprehensive measures of psychosocial stress that can be applied across species and across the lifespan. Applicants submitting proposals under this FOA are encouraged to incorporate variations in exposures, chronicity, environments (including toxicants and social environments), cognitions, and responses, as well as capture important factors for measuring stress in both humans and animals, in men and women, and across the lifespan. Such studies should demonstrate that the measures, coupled with appropriate bridges between laboratory and population-based designs, advance our understanding of the components of psychosocial stressors that are most relevant to disease, and provide comparability across studies. Opening Date: September 14, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 14, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 14, 2010.

On August 17, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Basic Mechanisms Influencing Behavioral Maintenance (R01) (RFA-HL-11-035). This FOA issued by the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) solicits research applications examining basic mechanisms of behavioral maintenance. The intent of this FOA is to advance research on basic processes and mechanisms involved in sustaining learned behavior over time and in the context of dynamic environmental influences and changing psychological and biological states. Maintenance of health behavior change is a critical problem in applied clinical research, and innovative strategies to address this problem require a better understanding of basic processes and mechanisms involved in long-term behavior maintenance. This FOA requests applications that will improve our understanding of how newly learned, effortful, and goal-directed behaviors transition to less effortful, automatic, and essentially non-goal-directed behaviors that are more easily maintained over time. A range of possible processes and mechanisms (e.g., neurobiological, cognitive, and environmental) may be proposed for study, and applicants are encouraged to study multiple mechanisms and their potential interactions. Regardless of mechanisms or processes of interest, however, applications should test how these mechanisms and processes facilitate or impede the transition from newly learned, effortful, and goal-directed behaviors to less effortful, automatic, and essentially non-goal-directed behaviors. A wide array of research proposals are potentially appropriate under this FOA, ranging from animal neurobehavioral models to human learning studies of social and environmental influences that facilitate or impede the transition to habitually maintained behaviors. Opening Date: September 14, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): September 14, 2010; Application Due Date(s): October 14, 2010.

On August 27, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components issued an RFA entitled Scientific Meetings for Creating Interdisciplinary Research Teams in Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research (R13) (RFA-CA-10-017). This FOA solicits Research Conference Grant (R13) applications for scientific meetings aimed at building interdisciplinary research teams in basic behavioral and social science research (b-BSSR). Applicants must propose developmental activities (i.e., meetings/workshops) that will build the capacity of interdisciplinary teams to accelerate, expand, and/or strengthen fundamental knowledge in b-BSSR as relevant to the Nation's health and well-being. Proposed interdisciplinary teams must include at least one investigator from the basic social and/or behavioral sciences, and must include investigators from at least one additional discipline. Applicants are encouraged to either: (1) accelerate, expand, and/or strengthen the scope of investigation of a specific b-BSSR research domain through the integration of disparate approaches from b-BSSR and allied disciplines; or (2) increase the sophistication of theoretical, methodological, and analytical approaches in b-BSSR. These goals may be accomplished by fostering the development of shared scientific terminology, approaches, and methodologies across disciplines in order to address a common b-BSSR research question. Investigators may submit applications to support multiple meetings over a period of up to two years. Opening Date: November 14, 2010; Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): November 14, 2010; Application Due Date(s): December 14, 2010.

Other Program Activities

Clinical Trials Network (CTN) Update

Protocols: A total of 45 protocols have been initiated since 2001, including multi-site clinical trials (31), multi-site surveys (3), studies in special populations (5), and secondary analyses of data across various trials (6). In addition, 23 ancillary studies have been supported by CTN and non-CTN funds. There are about 11,500 participants enrolled in CTN studies.

Primary outcome papers are published and dissemination materials have been developed with CSAT's ATTC on the following:

  • Protocol CTN 0001, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Inpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0002, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Outpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0005, MI (Motivational Interviewing) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0006, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Drug Free Clinics
  • Protocol CTN 0007, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Methadone Clinics

Primary outcome papers are published or in press for:

  • Protocol CTN 0003, Bup/Nx: Comparison of Two Taper Schedules
  • Protocol CTN 0004, MET (Motivational Enhancement Treatment) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0008, A Baseline for Investigating Diffusion of Innovation
  • Protocol CTN 0009, Smoking Cessation Treatment with Transdermal Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0010, Buprenorphine/Naloxone-Facilitated Rehabilitation for Heroin Addicted Adolescents/Young Adults
  • Protocol CTN 0011, A Feasibility Study of a Telephone Enhancement Procedure (TELE) to Improve Participation in Continuing Care Activities
  • Protocol CTN 0012, Characteristics of Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C Viral Infection, and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0013, Motivational Enhancement Therapy to Improve Treatment Utilization and Outcome In Pregnant Substance Abusers
  • Protocol CTN 0015, Women's Treatment for Trauma and Substance Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial
  • Protocol CTN 0016, Patient Feedback: A Performance Improvement Study in Outpatient Addiction Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0017, HIV and HCV Intervention in Drug Treatment Settings
  • Protocol CTN 0018, Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Men in Drug Abuse Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0019, Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Women in Drug Abuse Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0021, Motivational Enhancement Treatment to Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome for Spanish-Speaking Individuals Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse. This is the first Spanish-only protocol in the CTN.
  • Protocol CTN 0029, A Pilot Study of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) in Initiating and Maintaining Abstinence in Smokers with ADHD.
  • Protocol CTN 0030, Effects of Chronic Opioids in Subjects with a History of Opioid Use

In addition, the following protocols have submitted primary paper:

  • Protocol CTN 0014, Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers (BSFT)
  • Protocol CTN 0028, Randomized Controlled Trial of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders (SUD)
  • Protocol CTN 0030, Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS)

The following protocols have locked data:

  • Protocol CTN 0030A1, Collection of Economic Data for the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study. This ancillary study was conducted in collaboration with NIDA DESPR; it is in the data analysis phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0031, Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step (STAGE-12): Evaluation of a Combined Individual-Group Intervention to Reduce Stimulant and Other Drug Use by Increasing 12-Step Involvement. Recruitment was completed on September 30, 2009, yielding a total of 471 randomized participants across 10 sites. This total represents 21 more participants than proposed and was reached one week earlier than planned. Data lock was June 14, 2010; the study is now in the data analysis phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0031A1, An Evaluation of Neurocognitive Function, Oxidative Damage, and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Methamphetamine and Cocaine Abusers. Recruitment was completed on September 30, 2009, yielding a total of 173 participants across 6 sites completing the data collection and blood draw procedures. Data lock was June 14, 2010; the study is now in the data analysis phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0031A2, The Role of Alcohol Consumption in Classifications of Alcohol Use Disorders: A Clinical Study. It investigates the utility of adding a frequency measure of alcohol consumption (i.e., the first three items of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT-C]), to the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders. This study is funded by an MOU between NIDA and NIAAA. Data lock was June 14, 2010; the study is now in the data analysis phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0031A3, Organizational and Practitioner Influences on Implementation of STAGE-12. The study assesses the influence of counselor and organizational variables on fidelity of the STAGE-12 intervention during the clinical trial, tests the impact of fidelity on clinical trial participant outcomes, and explores the influence of counselor and organizational variables on sustainability of the STAGE-12 intervention following completion of the clinical trial. Study staff has already collected the organizational and counselor level data from all ten STAGE-12 sites. The baseline data obtained in this research formed the foundation for an R01 grant awarded by DESPR to Joseph Guydish, PhD, at the University of California, San Francisco.
  • Protocol CTN 0032, HIV Rapid Testing and Counseling in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs in the U.S. This study randomized 1281 participants to evaluate the most effective strategy to ensure that persons in drug treatment programs are tested for HIV and receive their HIV test results. The protocol has completed enrollment and is currently in the data analysis phase.

The following protocols has ended new enrollment, and are in the follow-up or data-lock phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0027, Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies (START) is a randomized, open-label, multi-center study that was developed in collaboration with the Division of Pharmacotherapies & Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMCDA). 1,269 participants were randomized. Data collection is expected to end in June, 2010.
  • Protocol CTN 0027A1, START Pharmacogenetics: Exploratory Genetic Studies In Starting Treatment With Agonist Replacement Therapies. This ancillary study consented 843 of the 1,269 subjects from the START study. Data collection is expected to end in June, 2010.
  • Protocol CTN 0030A3, POATS Long-Term Follow Up Study (LTFU) is being conducted at all POATS sites to examine long-term outcomes for individuals who participated in CTN-0030 with opioid analgesic (OA) dependence. This study will follow POATS participants for 42 months after randomization in the POATS study.
  • Protocol CTN 0032A1, Economic Analysis of HIV Rapid Testing in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs. This ancillary study is an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of on-site HIV testing in drug abuse treatment settings vs. referral for off-site testing. The PI is Dr. Bruce Schackman. The project is conducted in collaboration with NIDA's DESPR.
  • Protocol CTN 0034-Ot, Developing Research Capacity and Culturally Appropriate Research Methods: Community-based Participatory Research Manual for Collaborative Research in Drug Abuse for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the Pacific Northwest Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0035-Ot, Access to HIV and Hepatitis Screening and Care among Ethnic Minority Drug Users In and Out of Drug Treatment. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and is being conducted in the California/Arizona Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0036-Ot, Epidemiology and Ethnographic Survey of "Cheese" Heroin Use among Hispanics in Dallas County. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and is being conducted in the Texas Node.

The following protocols are currently enrolling:

  • CTN-0027A2, Retention of Suboxone Patients in START: Perspectives of Providers and Patients. The overall purposes of the supplemental study are to identify and assess barriers for retaining Suboxone patients. This ancillary study is in the development phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0033-Ot, Methamphetamine Use among American Indians. The first area of research emphasis in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Strategic Plan on Reducing Health Disparities (2004 Revision) is the epidemiology of drug abuse, health consequences and infectious diseases among minority populations. The study is a collaboration among four Nodes: Pacific NW, Southwest, Oregon/Hawaii, and Ohio Valley.
  • Protocol CTN 0037, Stimulant Reduction Intervention Using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE). This randomized clinical trial is testing the efficacy of the addition of exercise to treatment as usual in improving drug abuse treatment outcomes in patients abusing stimulants. As of August 5, 2010, ten participants have been enrolled at 4 sites.
  • Protocol CTN 0044, Web-delivery of Evidence-Based, Psychosocial Treatment for Substance Use Disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of adding an interactive, web-based version of the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) intervention plus abstinence incentives as an adjunct to community-based, outpatient substance abuse treatment. As of July 22, 2010, 29 randomized participants have been enrolled from 10 sites.
  • Protocol CTN 0046, Smoking-Cessation and Stimulant Treatment (S-CAST): Evaluation of the Impact of Concurrent Outpatient Smoking-Cessation and Stimulant Treatment on Stimulant-Dependence Outcomes. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of substance abuse treatment as usual plus smoking cessation treatment (TAU+SCT), relative to substance abuse treatment as usual (TAU), on drug abuse outcomes.

The following protocols are in the implementation/development phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0038-Ot, Barriers to Substance Abuse Treatment among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. The objective of this study is to gain a better understanding of the factors that may influence the under-utilization of substance abuse treatment services by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and the readiness of substance abuse treatment programs serving AAPIs to participate in clinical trials and adopt evidence based practices. This study is a collaboration with NIH NCMHD.
  • Protocol CTN 0044A2, Acceptability of a Web-delivered, Evidence-based, Psychosocial Intervention among Individuals with Substance Use Disorders who Identify as American Indian/Alaska Native. Results from prior research support the efficacy of a web-based version (Therapeutic Education System: TES) of the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) with individuals in outpatient substance abuse treatment; however, TES has yet to be tested among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. The principal objective of this study is to explore the acceptability of TES among a diverse sample of AI/AN enrolled in outpatient substance abuse treatment. The study is in the pre-implementation phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0045-Ot, Rates of HIV Testing and Barriers to Testing in African Americans Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment. This is an observational study seeking to: (1) Compare the proportion of African American and non-African Americans receiving treatment at substance abuse treatment clinics that have been tested for HIV within the past 12 months; (2) Observe relationships between rates of African Americans who have not been tested and a) the types of testing offered at substance abuse treatment clinics and b) the types of outreach strategies used to engage persons in HIV testing; and (3) assess African American clients' self-reported barriers to accessing HIV testing, in relation to other ethnicities.
  • Protocol CTN 0047, Screening, Motivational Assessment, Referral and Treatment in Emergency Departments (SMART-ED). The study objective is to evaluate the implementation of, and outcomes associated with, a screening and brief intervention (SBI) process to identify individuals with substance use, abuse, or dependence seen in emergency departments (EDs) and to provide interventions and/or referral to treatment consistent with the severity of their substance use disorder. Training for the two Wave 1 sites took place July 19-21, 2010 in Albuquerque, NM. Initial enrollment is expected to open later in the summer. Four additional Wave 2 sites were selected this summer and will be trained in November 2010.
  • Protocol CTN 0048, Cocaine Use Reduction with Buprenorphine (CURB). This concept is currently being developed into a protocol. The aim of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine in the presence of naltrexone for the treatment of cocaine dependence in a sample of individuals who meet criteria for cocaine dependence and lifetime opioid dependence or cocaine dependence and past year opioid abuse.
  • Protocols CTN 0037A1, CTN-0044A1, CTN0046A1, and CTN0047A1, Organizational and Practitioner Influences on Patient Outcomes. This series of ancillary studies will assess associations between site organizational and practitioner variables and site differences in clinical trial outcomes.
  • Protocol CTN 0049, Project HOPE (Hospital Visit as Opportunity for Prevention and Engagement for HIV-Infected Drug Users) has been approved to develop into a full protocol. The study will evaluate the effectiveness of a brief intervention, delivered to HIV-infected drug users recruited from the hospital setting, in achieving viral suppression.
  • Protocol CTN 0050, Long Term Follow Up of START Patients. This concept has been approved for further development into a protocol. The study will follow patients from the CTN 0027 START (Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies) study for 3-5 years to determine longer-term outcomes of Suboxone versus methadone treatment and investigate factors associated with post-START treatment access, utilization as well as providers' attitudes and knowledge regarding Suboxone and its adoption.

In addition to the primary CTN trials, there are currently five secondary analyses underway using data across several of the completed trials. Manuscripts are in progress and/or being prepared by the investigators. Posters are being presented at scientific meetings for several of the trials.

  1. Gender Differences in the Prevalence and Predictors of HIV Risk Behaviors, PI: Audrey Brooks (CA/AZ Node) - paper published by Substance Use and Misuse;
  2. Pattern of alcohol use and alcohol-related diagnoses among drug abusing/dependent participants, PIs: Dennis Donovan and Bryan Hartzler (Pacific Northwest Node); poster at ICTAB, paper published by Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, Manuscript submitted to special issue of AJDAA.
  3. The relationships between demographic characteristics of patients and therapists, measures of therapeutic process and therapeutic alliance, and outcomes, PIs: Alyssa Forcehimes (Southwest Node) and Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node); poster at CPDD, Manuscript submitted to special issue of AJDAA.
  4. The Efficacy of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for African Americans, PI: Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node); poster at CPDD, Manuscript submitted to special issue of AJDAA.
  5. Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes in Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations, PI: Carmen Masson (California-Arizona Node).

There are also approximately 45 funded studies supported by independent grants that use CTN studies as a platform.

Science Education

Two NIDA grants received administrative supplements as part of the NIH's Blueprint for Neuroscience Research supplement program for R25 science education grants. A total of only 6 supplements were awarded across all of NIH. Drs. Rochelle Schwartz-Bloom and Leslie Miller both received supplements for their outstanding Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award funded science education programs.




NIDA's New and Competing Continuation Grants Awarded Since May 2010

Aharonovich, Efrat -- New York State Psychiatric Institute
Healthcall: Brief Intervention to Reduce Drug Use in HIV Primary Care

Al'absi, Mustafa N. -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Stress Response and Opioid Dysfunction in Nicotine Dependence

Altice, Frederick Lewis -- Yale University
Prison Interventions and HIV Prevention Collaboration

Ananthan, Subramaniam -- Southern Research Institute
Targeted Library Synthesis and Screening: Allosteric Modulators of Transporters

Back, Sudie E. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Integrated Treatment of OEF/OIF Veterans with PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

Bartlett, Selena E. -- Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center
Identifying Chemical Modulators of CRF-Binding Protein and CRF Receptor Complexes

Becker, Jill B. -- University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Protective Benefits of Maternal Behavior on Susceptibility for Drug Abuse

Bickel, Warren K. -- University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock
Inter-Temporal Trade-Offs in the Risky Decisions of Cocaine Addicts

Binswanger, Ingrid A. -- University of Colorado Denver
HIV Risk Behavior in Drug-Involved Former Inmates

Bland, Sondra T. -- University of Colorado Denver
Social Influences on Drug Reward and Monoamines

Borders, Tyrone Finley -- University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock
Rural and Urban African American Cocaine Users' Perceived Need for Care

Boyden, Edward S. -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Novel Platforms for Systematic Optical Control of Complex Neural Circuits in Vivo

Brene, Stefan -- Karolinska Institute
Role of Nogo Receptor in Addiction

Brouwer, Kimberly C. -- University of California, San Diego
Evolving HIV/STI Risk Environments of FSWs on the Mexico/U.S. Border

Caldwell, Linda Lee -- Pennsylvania State University-University Park
Healthwise Dissemination: Translation to Multiple Schools

Carrico, Adam Wayne -- University of California, San Francisco
A Pilot RCT of Expressive Writing with HIV-Positive Methamphetamine Users

Carroll, Frank I. -- Research Triangle Institute
Selective Opioid Antagonists as Medications for Drug Abuse

Chang, Yu-Ping -- State University of New York at Buffalo
Prescription Psychotherapeutic Drug Use Among Older Adults

Chawarski, Marek C. -- Yale University
Behavioral Drug and HIV Risk Reduction Counseling with MMT in China

Churchwell, John Clyburn -- University of Utah
Imaging the Fronto-Limbic-Striatal Circuit in Adolescent Cannabis Users

Comer, Sandra D. -- New York State Psychiatric Institute
Prescription Opioid Effects in Drug and Non-Drug Abusers

Conger, Rand Donald -- University of California, Davis
Mexican Family Culture and Substance Use Risk and Resilience

Cooper, Hannah L. -- Emory University
Public Housing Relocations: Impact on HIV Risk and Drug Use

Corsi, Karen F. -- University of Colorado, Denver
Reduction of Drug Use and HIV Risk Among Out-of-Treatment Methamphetamine Users

Cullen, Bryan R. -- Duke University
HIV-1: micrORNA Interactions

Dallery, Jesse -- National Development and Research Institutes
Internet-Based Group Contingency Management to Promote Smoking Abstinence

Dore, Gregory J. -- University of New South Wales
Treatment of Recently Acquired Hepatitis C Virus Infection

Dougherty, Donald M. -- University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
Consequences of Adolescent Substance Use on the Development of Impulse Control

Eitle, David -- Montana State University (Bozeman)
Understanding Racial Disparities in Teen Methamphetamine Use

France, Charles P. -- University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
Delay Discounting: Effects of Drug Dependence and Withdrawal

Frank, Deborah A. -- Boston Medical Center
Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Young Adult Follow Up

Fuller, Crystal M. -- Columbia University Health Sciences
Post Exposure Prophylaxis Among IDU Syringe Customers-Pharmacy Pilot Intervention

Garner, Bryan R. -- Chestnut Health Systems, Inc.
Impact, Predictors, and Mediators of Therapist Turnover

Gendelman, Howard E. -- University of Nebraska Medical Center
Nanoart Manufacture, Delivery and Pharmacokinetics for Optimizing Drug Adherence

Gewirtz, Abigail -- University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Effectiveness of a Web-Enhanced Parenting Program for Military Families

Gintzler, Alan R. -- SUNY Downstate Medical Center
Sex-Dependent Expression and Utilization of Spinal Mu- and Kappa-Opioid Systems

Heimer, Robert -- Yale University
Influences on HIV Prevalence and Service Access Among IDUs in Russia and Estonia

Hudson, Teresa Jo -- University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock
Use and Abuse of Prescription Opioids Among OEF/OIF Veterans

Hulgan, Todd M. -- Vanderbilt University
Mitochondrial Genomics and Effects of Cocaine on T-Cells During HIV-Infection

Janda, Kim D. -- Scripps Research Institute
Vaccines for the Treatment of Opiate Addiction

Janda, Kim D. -- Scripps Research Institute
Immunopharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Cocaine Abuse

Jensen, John E. -- McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA)
Proton Echo-Planar Spectroscopic Imaging of GABA, Glutamate/Glutamine at 4 Tesla

Kable, Joseph W. -- University of Pennsylvania
Neural Mechanisms Underlying Changes in Preference

Kalivas, Peter W. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Cocaine, Opoids and Drug Abuse

Kennedy, Mary B. -- California Institute of Technology
CRCNS: Modeling Activation of CaMKII in Spines

Khan, Maria Rabia -- University of Maryland, College Park Campus
Relationship Disruption During Incarceration and HIV Risk in African American Men

Kiehl, Kent A. -- The Mind Research Network
Action Monitoring, Action Observation and Dopamine Genes as Predictors of Substance

Kleinfeld, David -- University of California, San Diego
CNiFERs Cell-Based Neurotransmitter Fluorescent Engineered Reporters

Kornbluth, Richard -- Multimeric Biotherapeutics, Inc.
Precision Immunization Vaccine for Nicotine and Other Drugs of Abuse

Kotelchuck, Milton -- Boston University Medical Campus
Linking State Data to Identify Unmet Need for Drug Treatment in Women Aged 15-49

Kurtz, Steven P. -- University of Delaware
A Self-Assessment Intervention for Young Adult Polydrug Users at Risk for HIV

Ladias, John A.A. -- Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Structural Basis for Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Signaling

Langford, Teresa Dianne -- Temple University
Cocaine and HIV-Mediated Disruptions of Hypothalamic Signaling in Hypothyroidism

Larson, Mary Jo -- Brandeis University
First Longitudinal Study of Missed Treatment Opportunities Using DOD and VA Data

Latimer, William W. -- Johns Hopkins University
Four-Arm RCT of Brief MI vs. Couples-Based HIV/STI Prevention in South Africa

Lejuez, Carl W. -- University of Maryland, College Park Campus
Behavioral Technologies for Predicting HIV Risk

Lerman, Caryn -- University of Pennsylvania
Pharmacogenetics of Nicotine Addiction Treatment

Lester, Henry A. -- California Institute of Technology
Nicotinic Ligands for Smoking Cessation

Lester, Henry A. -- California Institute of Technology
Alpha4 Nicotinic Receptor in Addiction: Mouse Models

Levy, Jay A. -- University of California San Francisco
Protection from HIV Infection in Intravenous Drug Users

Li, Li -- University of California, Los Angeles
Development of a Family Intervention to Address Drug Use and HIV in Vietnam

Lipford, Grayson B. -- Selecta Biosciences, Inc.
Development of a Next Generation Vaccine for Smoking Cessation and Relapse Prevention

Liu, Philip K. -- Massachusetts General Hospital
Aptamer Imaging: A Theranostic Approach to Treat Substance Abuse

Lynch, Wendy Jean -- University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Dopaminergic and Glutamatergic Mechanisms of Cocaine Addiction: Sex Differences

Mach, Robert H. -- Washington University
PET Radiotracers for Imaging the Dopamine D3 Receptor

Mackie, Kenneth P. -- Indiana University, Bloomington
Neuronal Cannabinoids

MacPherson, Laura -- University of Maryland, College Park Campus
Behavioral Activation Intervention, Reward Processing and Youth Smoking Cessation

MacPherson, Laura -- University of Maryland, College Park Campus
Stage II Trial of Novel Behavioral Activation Intervention for Smoking Cessation

Madden, Gregory J. -- Utah State University
Experimental Manipulations of Impulsivity: Effects on Gambling and Drug Taking

Mahajan, Supriya Dinkar -- State University of New York at Buffalo
Innovative Nanotherapy for Drug Addiction.

Mandara, Jelanin -- Northwestern University
Parenting Prevention-Intervention for Mothers of African American Adolescent Males

Margolis, David M. -- University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
HIV Latency, Epigenetics, and Therapeutics

Mason, W. Alex -- Father Flanagan's Boys' Home
Skills Training for Parents and Teens to Improve the Transition to High School

McCann, Una D. -- Johns Hopkins University
PET Studies of the SERT and DAT in Meth Users

McCarthy, Danielle Erin -- Rutgers the State University of NJ, New Brunswick
Evaluation of Learning-Theory-Based Smoking Cessation Strategies

McDonald, Patricia Helen -- Scripps Research Institute
Development of Chemical Probes to Investigate the Role of Ntsr1 in Cns Disorders

McGovern, Mark P. -- Dartmouth College
A Stage II Efficacy Study of CBT for PTSD in Community Addiction Treatment

McGovern, Mark P. -- Dartmouth College
Integrated CBT for Co-Occurring PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

Mercier, Richard W. -- Northeastern University
Ligand Assisted Protein Structure: A Novel Method for Deducing Ligand Binding Arc

Mesangeau, Christophe M. -- University of Mississippi
Non-Peptidic Neuropeptide FF Receptor Probes

Miller, Gregory M. -- Harvard University (Medical School)
Epigenetic Regulation of Serotonin: Relevance to HIV and Methamphetamine Abuse

Molina, Patricia E. -- Louisiana State University HSC, New Orleans
Cannabinoid Epigenomic and MiRNA Mechanisms Impact HIV/SIV Disease Progression

Moron-Concepcion, Jose A. -- Columbia University Health Sciences
AMPA Receptors: Common Role in Opiate Withdrawal and Pain Sensitivity

Moroz, Leonid L. -- University of Florida
Spatial Organization of the Genome in Identified Neurons of Memory Circuits

Nestler, Eric J. -- Mount Sinai School of Medicine of NYU
Neurotrophic Mechanisms in Opiate and Cocaine Action

Ohlmeyer, Michael -- Mount Sinai School of Medicine of NYU
Small Molecule Libraries Targeted to CBP and Attenuation AfosB Expression

Parsons, Jeffrey T. -- Hunter College
Intervention Targeting Substance Using Older Adults with HIV

Perry, Seth -- University of Rochester
GSK3, Endocytosis, and Enhanced HIV Infection: Abused Drugs and Novel Therapies

Posner, Michael -- University of Oregon
Reducing Addiction Through Training Brain States

Rana, Tariq M. -- Burnham Institute for Medical Research
Regulation of HIV Infection by Methamphetamine and Non-Coding RNAs

Rice, Andrew P. -- Baylor College of Medicine
Effects of Cocaine on MiRNAs That Regulate HIV-1 Replication

Riggins, Tracy -- University of Maryland, College Park Campus
Neural Correlates of Risk-Taking in Adolescents Exposed to Drugs Prenatally

Rosenblum, Andrew Bruce -- National Development and Research Institutes
Web-Based CBT for Opioid-Treated, Chronic Pain Patients with Aberrant Behavior

Rothenberg, Richard B. -- Georgia State University
Network-Directed Community Screening for HIV

Rusyniak, Daniel E. -- Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis
CNS Circuitry and Receptors Mediating the Effects of MDMA

Schultz, John Albert -- Ionwerks, Inc.
Bio-Mass Spec Microanalysis Augments Optical Histology

Sevy, Serge -- Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
Improving Substance Use and Clinical Outcomes in Heavy Cannabis Users

Shacham, Enbal -- Washington University
Where to Intervene? Geospatial Variation of HIV Transmission Behaviors

Shane, Matthew -- The Mind Research Network
Using Real-Time fRMI to Facilitate Neuromodulation to Drug-Cues in Adolescent Abu

Shane, Matthew -- The Mind Research Network
Error Detection and Error Awareness in Incarcerated Cocaine Dependent Individuals

Shannon, Kate -- University of British Columbia
Social and Structural Context of HIV/STI Risk Among FSWs

Sharma, Anjali -- SUNY Downstate Medical Center
Insulin-Like Growth Factor and Bone Mineral Density in HIV-Infected Women and Men

Shin, Sunny H. -- Boston University
Childhood Interpersonal Trauma and Substance Abuse

Spirito, Anthony N. -- Brown University
Individual and Family Motivational Interviews for Substance Using Truant Teens

Strain, Eric C. -- Johns Hopkins University
Medications Development for Drug Abuse Disorders

Suchman, Nancy E. -- Yale University
Fostering Mothers' Emotionally-Responsive Parenting

Swenson, Cynthia Cupit -- Medical University of South Carolina
Family-Based Treatment for Parental Substance Abuse and Child Maltreatment

Tao, Rui -- Florida Atlantic University
Mechanisms of Sudden Onset of Malignant MDMA Neurotoxicity

Thomas, David L. -- Johns Hopkins University
HIV HCV Co-infection Antiviral Therapy and Fibrosis

Thomas, James B. -- Research Triangle Institute
Synthesis and Testing of Targeted Libraries to Identify Small-Molecule Agonists A

Tyndale, Rachel Fynvola -- Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Reduced CYP2B6 Metabolism Influences Smoking Initiation and Treatment Response: I

Van Dorn, Richard -- University of South Florida
Longitudinal Substance Use Trajectories for Persons with Schizophrenia: An Applicatiom

Verdin, Eric J. -- David Gladstone Institutes
Epigenetic Regulation of HIV Latency

Wainberg, Milton L. -- New York State Psychiatric Institute
HIV/STI Prevention for Adolescents with Substance Use Disorder in Treatment

Walsh, Sharon L. -- University of Kentucky
Licit and Illicit Opioids: Comparative Studies in Humans

Walwyn, Wendy M. -- University of California, Los Angeles
Delta Opioid Receptor Upregulation: A New Model to Examine the Effects of Cocaine

West, Mark O. -- Rutgers the State University of NJ, New Brunswick
Cocaine-Seeking in Rats: Ultrasonic Vocalizations and Accumbens Neural Activity

Wilcox, George Latimer -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor Interactions

Wiley, Jenny L. -- Research Triangle Institute
Endocannabinoid Discrimination

Woolverton, William L. -- University of Mississippi Medical Center
Delay Discounting and the Choice to Take a Drug

Yao, Honghong -- University of Nebraska Medical Center
Cocaine-Mediated Neuroinflammation: Role in Neuroaids

Yonkers, Kimberly A. -- Yale University
Project Start: Screening to Augment Referral to Treatment

Yonkers, Kimberly A. -- Yale University
Progesterone for Postpartum Cocaine Relapse


Index

Research Findings

Program Activities

Extramural Policy and Review Activities

Congressional Affairs

International Activities

Meetings and Conferences

Media and Education Activities

Planned Meetings

Publications

Staff Highlights

Grantee Honors



Archive Home | Accessibility | Privacy | FOIA (NIH) | Current NIDA Home Page
National Institutes of Health logo_Department of Health and Human Services Logo The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Questions? See our Contact Information. . The U.S. government's official web portal