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NIDA Home > Publications > Director's Reports > May, 2010 Index    

Director's Report to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse - May, 2010



Program Activities

New NIDA PAs and RFAs

On January 26, 2010, NIDA issued a Program Announcement (PA) entitled Pre-Application for the 2010 NIDA Translational Avant-Garde Award for Medication Development for Diseases of Addiction (X02) (PAR-10-095). The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to encourage pre-applications for The NIDA Translational Avant-Garde Award. The NIDA Translational Avant-Garde Award is designed to support dedicated and talented basic and/or clinical researchers with the vision, drive and expertise necessary to translate research discoveries into medications for the treatment of diseases of addiction. Through this FOA, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is committed to making significant advances in the development of safe and efficacious products for the treatment of disorders stemming from tobacco, cannabis, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, or prescription opiate use or abuse. This announcement will utilize the X02 mechanism for submission and consideration of pre-applications. The X02 pre-application is a first step in applying for a Translational Avant-Garde Award. Application Due Date(s): March 22, 2010.

On January 27, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Technology-Based Adherence Interventions for Substance Abusing Populations with HIV (R01) (PAS-10-097). Through this FOA, NIDA seeks to stimulate and support research on the determination of efficacy and potency of interventions that utilize technological tools (e.g., mobile enabling technologies, Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA), enhanced Medication Event Monitoring System, computer software, portable digital devices, cell phone and/or Digital Assistant Device among others) to foster adherence to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) treatment regimens among substance abusing populations in naturally occurring timeframes and contexts. Multidisciplinary collaboration between social scientists, medical (physician/nurse) researchers and technology experts to develop and refine mobile technological instrumentation, e-health technology and software as interventions (or as part of interventions) that foster adherence to HIV treatment regimens and access to care in "real time" is encouraged. This FOA will utilize the R01 grant mechanism and runs in parallel with FOA of identical scientific scope, PAS-10-098 that encourages applications under the R34 mechanism.

On January 27, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Technology-Based Adherence Interventions for Substance Abusing Populations with HIV (R34) (PAS-10-098). Through this FOA, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) seeks to stimulate and support research on the development, determination of feasibility, and pilot testing of interventions that utilize technological tools (e.g., mobile enabling technologies, Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA), enhanced Medication Event Monitoring System, computer software, portable digital devices, cell phone and/or Digital Assistant Device among others) to foster adherence to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) treatment regimens among substance abusing populations in naturally occurring timeframes and contexts. Multidisciplinary collaboration between social scientists, medical (physician/nurse) researchers and technology experts to develop and refine mobile technological instrumentation, e-health technology and software as interventions (or as part of interventions) that foster adherence to HIV treatment regimens and access to care in "real time" is encouraged. This FOA will utilize the R34 grant mechanism and runs in parallel with FOA of identical scientific scope, PAS-10-097 that encourages applications under the R01 mechanism.

On March 11, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Drug Abuse Aspects of HIV/AIDS (R01) (PA-10-129). This FOA encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications to examine the drug abuse aspects of HIV/AIDS, including research on drug-related risk behaviors, addiction and HIV disease, and drug use/HIV-related comorbidities and consequences. Proposals are needed to identify and predict changes in the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS among injection and non-injection drug users and among their sexual partners, to develop and test primary and secondary drug abuse and HIV prevention and treatment interventions, to improve HIV testing, counseling, and treatment services for those living with HIV/AIDS, and to address basic mechanisms involved in HIV infection and AIDS pathogenesis in the context of drug abuse and addiction. This FOA will utilize the R01 grant mechanism, and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-10-130, that encourages applications under the R21 and PA-10-131 that encourages applications under the R03 mechanism.

On March 11, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Drug Abuse Aspects of HIV/AIDS (R21) (PA-10-130). This FOA encourages Exploratory Developmental Research Grant (R21) applications for early and conceptual stages of research on drug abuse aspects of HIV/AIDS, including research on drug-related risk behaviors, addiction and HIV disease, and drug use/HIV-related comorbidities and consequences. Proposals are needed to identify and predict changes in the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS among injection and non-injection drug users and among their sexual partners, to develop and test primary and secondary drug abuse and HIV prevention and treatment interventions, to improve HIV testing, counseling, and treatment services for those living with HIV/AIDS, and to address basic mechanisms involved in HIV infection and AIDS pathogenesis in the context of drug abuse and addiction. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/ Developmental (R21) award mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-10-129 that encourages applications under the R01 and PA-10-131 that encourages applications under the R03 mechanism.

On March 11, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Drug Abuse Aspects of HIV/AIDS (R03) (PA-10-131). This FOA encourages Small Grant (R03) applications for pilot or feasibility studies, secondary data analysis, and small, self-contained research projects on drug abuse aspects of HIV/AIDS, including research on drug-related risk behaviors, addiction and HIV disease, and drug use/HIV-related comorbidities and consequences. Proposals are needed to identify and predict changes in the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS among injection and non-injection drug users and among their sexual partners, to develop and test primary and secondary drug abuse and HIV prevention and treatment interventions, to improve HIV testing, counseling, and treatment services for those living with HIV/AIDS, and to address basic mechanisms involved in HIV infection and AIDS pathogenesis in the context of drug abuse and addiction. This FOA will utilize the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-10-129 that encourages applications under the R01 and PA-10-130 that encourages applications under the R21 mechanism.

On March 8, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled Collaborative Clinical Trials in Drug Abuse (Collaborative R01) (PAR-10-099). This FOA seeks to support collaborative clinical trials in drug abuse (CCTDA) through the funding of "linked" Research Project Grant (R01) applications across different study sites (e.g., different institutions, organizations, and/or multiple campuses within a single institution or university system). Each research group must submit a separate R01 application, but should conduct clinical trials utilizing one common research plan. A lead group should be designated as the coordinating site. Although a foreign institution may be included as a participating site, the coordinating site must be a domestic institution/organization. Through this FOA, NIDA seeks to increase the clinical collaboration of investigators between multiple clinical research groups, while simultaneously facilitating the study of outcome measures and/or patient populations that require larger numbers of subjects than any single site can reasonable enroll. This FOA will utilize the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism.

On April 20, 2010, NIDA issued a PA entitled NIDA Research Education Program for Clinical Researchers and Clinicians (R25) (PAR-10-173). The NIDA Research Education Program will support research education and training for those in clinically focused careers. Participants (those receiving the research education and training) should be training for careers as clinical researchers, clinicians/service providers, or optimally, a combination of the two. This mechanism may not be used for support of non-research related clinical training. In addition, applicant organizations may only propose research education experiences at the following levels of professional career development: medical/graduate student, postdoctoral fellow, medical resident, and/or independent scientist. Research education and training activities may be in any topic area related to substance use/abuse/addiction; however, the following are examples of particular relevance to this FOA: etiology; clinical assessment and diagnostics; treatment; prevention; health services; clinical neuroscience; medical consequences of drug abuse; and pre-clinical research as it pertains to translational research. Interdisciplinary research education is encouraged and may include co-morbid conditions and consequences of drug use such as HIV/AIDS. Education partnerships and collaborations are also encouraged. This FOA will use the NIH Research Education (R25) grant mechanism. Research education programs may not be transferred from one institution to another, unless strongly justified (see Section VI.2). Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): 30 days prior to the application submission date; Application Submission/Receipt Date(s): May 25, 2010, May 25, 2011, and May 25, 2012.

On January 22, 2010, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Systems Biology, HIV/AIDS, and Substance Abuse (R01) (RFA-DA-10-014). The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications utilizing systems biology approaches to interrogate and integrate multiple complex databases in order to discover new paradigms that may lead to unanticipated avenues of research at the interface of HIV/AIDS and substance use and abuse. This FOA will utilize the R01 award mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): March 29, 2010; Application Due Date(s): April 29, 2010.

On January 26, 2010, NIDA issued an RFA entitled 2010 NIDA Translational Avant-Garde Award for Medication Development for Diseases of Addiction (DP1) (RFA-DA-10-013). The NIDA Translational Avant-Garde Award is designed to support dedicated and talented basic and/or clinical researchers with the vision, drive and expertise necessary to translate research discoveries into medications for the treatment of diseases of addiction. Through this funding FOA, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is committed to making significant advances in the development of safe and efficacious products for the treatment of disorders stemming from tobacco, cannabis, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, or prescription opiate use or abuse. These products can be pharmaceuticals ("small molecules") or biologics. Biologics include medicinal products such as vaccines and recombinant therapeutic proteins created by biological processes. Applications may focus on the pharmacotherapy of one or various disorders. Applications may also focus on the specific symptoms of the disorder such as withdrawal, craving or relapse. Testing of new formulations of marketed medications that are available for other indications, or new combinations of existing medications, which may be promising candidates for the treatment of diseases of addiction is within the scope of this FOA. The 2010 Translational Avant-Garde Award competition will proceed in two phases. The first phase is a pre-application phase in response to PAR-10-095. Pre-applications will be evaluated by a group of external reviewers. Those investigators whose submissions are judged to be the most outstanding will be notified of the opportunity to submit full applications under this FOA (DP1). The 2010 Avant-Garde awardees will be selected from this group of applicants. This FOA will utilize the DP1 grant mechanism. Pre-applications for 2010 Translational Avant-Garde Awards were encouraged under PAR-10-095. Application Due Date(s): July 2, 2010.

On January 26, 2010, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Medications Development for Substance Related Disorders (R01) (RFA-DA-10-018). Through this FOA, NIDA is soliciting grant (R01) applications to support a diverse array of preclinical and/or clinical research projects that accelerate the translational discovery/ development of safe and effective medications for the treatment of substance-related disorders (SRDs), with the ultimate goal of moving closer to, or gaining FDA approval of medications for the treatment of these disorders. This FOA will utilize the R01 award mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): March 29, 2010; Application Due Date(s): April 29, 2010.

On January 26, 2010, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Deep Sequencing and Analysis of Pharmacogenomic Regions: Discovery and Analysis of Genetic Variants Contributing to Drug Abuse and Addiction (R01) (RFA-DA-10-019). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been critical for identifying genomic regions associated with addiction phenotypes, and have highlighted several areas that require further refinement using deep sequencing approaches. The goal of this FOA is to support studies proposing to use next-generation sequencing technologies to identify the structural variants and SNP variants with rare to moderate frequencies that affect addiction risk in well-characterized samples with drug abuse phenotypes. Applications may propose strategies for deep sequencing based on family based designs; deep sequencing of regions identified by GWAS to be associated with addiction risk; sequencing candidate genes in individuals with extreme phenotypes; or other analytic approaches that capitalize on the genetic architecture. Applicants must use existing DNA samples with appropriately obtained consents for broad data sharing. This FOA will utilize the R01 award mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): March 29, 2010; Application Due Date(s): April 29, 2010.

PAs/RFAs Issued with Other NIH Components/Agencies

On February 3, 2010, NIDA and several other NIDA components jointly issued a PA entitled Scientific Meetings for Creating Interdisciplinary Research Teams (R13) (PA-10-106). This FOA encourages Research Conference Grant (R13) applications from institutions and organizations that propose to develop interdisciplinary research teams. Teams must include investigators from the social and/or behavioral sciences, and may include the life and/or physical sciences. The goal is to broaden the scope of investigation into scientific problems, yield fresh and possibly unexpected insights, and increase the sophistication of theoretical, methodological, and analytical approaches by integrating the analytical strengths of two or more disparate scientific disciplines while addressing gaps in terminology, approach, and methodology. This program will allow investigators from multiple disciplines to hold meetings in order to provide the foundation for developing interdisciplinary research projects. This FOA will utilize the R13 grant mechanism.

On February 16, NIDA and numerous other NIH components issued a PA entitled Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral MD/PhD and Other Dual Doctoral Degree Fellows (Parent F30) (PA-10-107). The purpose of the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (Kirschstein-NRSA) is to provide support to individuals for combined MD/PhD and other dual doctoral degree training (e.g. DO/PhD, DDS/PhD, AuD/PhD). The participating Institutes award this Kirschstein-NRSA individual fellowship (F30) to qualified applicants with the potential to become productive, independent, highly trained physician-scientists and other clinician-scientists, including patient-oriented researchers in their scientific mission areas. This funding opportunity supports individual predoctoral F30 fellowships with the expectation that these training opportunities will increase the number of future investigators with both clinical knowledge and skills in basic, translational or clinical research. This FOA will utilize the NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) award mechanism for Individual Predoctoral MD/PhD and other dual-degree Fellows (F30).

On February 16, 2010, NIDA and numerous other NIH components jointly issued a PA entitled Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral Fellows (Parent F31) (PA-10-108). The purpose of this individual predoctoral research training fellowship is to provide support for promising doctoral candidates who will be performing dissertation research and training in scientific health-related fields relevant to the missions of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) during the tenure of the award. This FOA will utilize the NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein Individual Predoctoral National Research Service Award (NRSA) award mechanism (F31).

On February 16, 2010, NIDA and numerous other NIH components jointly issued a PA entitled Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral Fellowships to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (Parent F31 - Diversity) (PA-10-109). The purpose of this individual predoctoral research training fellowship is to improve the diversity of the health-related research workforce by supporting the training of predoctoral students from groups that have been shown to be underrepresented. Such candidates include individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. This FOA will utilize the NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein Individual Predoctoral National Research Service Award (NRSA) award mechanism (F31).

On February 16, 2010, NIDA and numerous other NIH components issued a PA entitled Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) for Individual Senior Fellows (Parent F33) (PA-10-111). The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awards individual senior level research training fellowships to experienced scientists who wish to make major changes in the direction of their research careers or who wish to broaden their scientific background by acquiring new research capabilities as independent investigators in research fields relevant to the missions of participating NIH Institutes and Centers. This FOA will utilize the Ruth L. Kirschstein Individual Postdoctoral National Research Service Award (NRSA) award mechanism (F33).

On March 5, 2010, NIDA participated in the issuance of the NIH-wide announcement entitled Recovery Act Limited Competition: The NIH Director's ARRA Funded Pathfinder Award to Promote Diversity in the Scientific Workforce (DP4) (RFA-OD-10-013). This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 ("Recovery Act" or "ARRA"), Public Law 111-5, invites applications for the NIH Director's ARRA Pathfinder Award to Promote Diversity in the Scientific Workforce. The NIH recognizes a unique and compelling need to promote diversity in the biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social sciences research workforce. The NIH expects all of its efforts to diversify the workforce to lead to the recruitment of the most talented researchers from all groups; to improve the quality of the educational and training environment; to balance and broaden the perspective in setting research priorities; to improve the ability to recruit subjects from diverse backgrounds into clinical research protocols; and to improve the Nation's capacity to address and eliminate health disparities. This new FOA introduces a new research grant program to encourage exceptionally creative individual scientists to develop highly innovative and possibly transforming approaches for promoting diversity within the biomedical research workforce. To be considered highly innovative, the proposed research must reflect ideas substantially different from those already being pursued or it must apply existing research designs in new and innovative ways to unambiguously identify factors that will improve the retention of students, postdocs and faculty from diverse backgrounds. Awardees must commit a major portion (generally 30% or more) of their research effort to activities supported by the Director's Pathfinder Award and the proposed research must be endorsed by the highest levels of institutional management. This FOA will utilize the DP4 grant mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): April 5, 2010; Application Due Date(s): May 4, 2010.

On March 5, 2010, NIDA participated in the issuance of a PA entitled SHIFT Award: Small Businesses Helping Investigators to Fuel the Translation of Scientific Discoveries [SBIR: R43/R44] (PA-10-122). The primary objectives of the SHIFT SBIR initiative are: (1) to foster research that is translational in nature and (2) to transform academic scientific discoveries into commercial products and services. Academic researchers can be a driving force for new products and services in a small business concern (SBC). A major feature of the SHIFT program includes the requirement for an investigator who is primarily employed by a United States research institution at the time of application to transition to a small business concern (SBC) and be primarily employed (more than 50% time) by the SBC by or at the time of award. A SHIFT SBIR grant enables an SBC to increase both its scientific research staff and its core competencies. The Project Director/Principal Investigator (PD/PI) may also facilitate SBC licensing of intellectual property (IP) from the PD/PI's prior academic institutions, promote collaboration opportunities with academic investigators, and enable better access to academic resources. This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications.

On March 2, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components issued a PA entitled Jointly Sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Institutional Predoctoral Training Program in the Neurosciences (T32) (PAR-10-116). The Jointly Sponsored NIH Predoctoral Training Program in the Neurosciences supports broad and fundamental, early-stage graduate research training in the neurosciences via institutional NRSA research training grants (T32) at domestic institutions of higher education. Trainees are supported during years 1 and 2 of their graduate research training when they are typically not committed to a dissertation laboratory. The primary objective is to prepare qualified individuals for careers in neuroscience that have a significant impact on the health-related research needs of the Nation. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will utilize the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Institutional Research Training Grants (T32) award mechanism. Letters of Intent Submission Date(s): April 25, 2010; Application Submission Date(s): May 25, 2010.

On March 15, 2010, NIDA participated in the issuance of a FOA with other HHS and NIH components entitled The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) (R24). This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), supported by funds provided to the NIH and HRSA under the "Tom Lantos and Henry Hyde United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008," Public Law 110-293 (more commonly known as the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief [PEPFAR]), invites proposals from foreign Institutions in Sub-Saharan African countries which receive PEPFAR support (http://www.pepfar.gov/countries/index.htm) and their partners to develop or expand and enhance models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. These models are intended to support PEPFAR's goal of increasing the number of new health care workers by 140,000, strengthen medical education systems in the countries in which they exist, and build clinical and research capacity in Africa as part of a retention strategy for faculty of medical schools and clinical professors. The strategy of this initiative is to build human capacity for health in Africa by strengthening the medical education system in an environment that values and nurtures research and which will contribute to the sustainability and quality of the overall effort. These models will also contribute to the sustainability of the PEPFAR investments through the provision of excellence in clinical training and the capacity of medical students and faculty to participate in and carry out multidisciplinary locally driven research (e.g. implementation science and/or clinical, health services, and operations research) that responds to the health needs of their communities and country and improves health outcomes for men, women, and children. In addition to PEPFAR support for strengthening medical education in African institutions, funds are also being provided from the Office of AIDS Research (OAR), located within the NIH Office of the Director, in support of the research capacity building component of this initiative and building on OAR's long-term support for NIH efforts to build sustainable research and training partnerships between U.S. and African educational and research institutions. Linked awards that focus on diseases and priority health areas related to and/or beyond HIV/AIDS will also be available through the NIH Common Fund initiative (http://commonfund.nih.gov/), managed by the Office of Strategic Coordination (OSC), located within the NIH Office of the Director. These awards are part of the NIH Director's decision to make global health one of the NIH's highest priorities. This FOA will utilize the NIH Resource-Related Research Project (R24) grant award mechanism for all applications submitted. Letters of Intent Receipt Date: April 12, 2010; Application Due Date: May 12, 2010.

On March 18, 2010, NIDA and numerous other NIH components jointly issued a PA entitled Behavioral and Social Science Research on Understanding and Reducing Health Disparities (R01) (PAR-10-136). The purpose of this FOA is to encourage behavioral and social science research on the causes and solutions to health and disabilities disparities in the U. S. population. Health disparities between, on the one hand, racial/ethnic populations, lower socioeconomic classes, and rural residents and, on the other hand, the overall U.S. population are major public health concerns. Emphasis is placed on research in and among three broad areas of action: 1) public policy, 2) health care, and 3) disease/disability prevention. Particular attention is given to reducing "health gaps" among groups. Proposals that utilize an interdisciplinary approach, investigate multiple levels of analysis, incorporate a life-course perspective, and/or employ innovative methods such as system science or community-based participatory research are particularly encouraged. This FOA will utilize the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PAR-10-137, that encourages applications under the R21. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): August 14, 2010, December 11, 2010, April 11, 2011, August 14, 2011, December 11, 2011, April 11, 2012, August 14, 2012, December 14, 2012, April 11, 2013. Application Due Date(s): September 14, 2010, January 11, 2011, May 11, 2011, September 14, 2011, January 11, 2012, May 11, 2012, September 14, 2012, January 14, 2013, May 11, 2013.

On March 18, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Behavioral and Social Science Research on Understanding and Reducing Health Disparities (R21) (PAR-10-137). The purpose of this FOA is to encourage behavioral and social science research on the causes and solutions to health and disabilities disparities in the U. S. population. Health disparities between, on the one hand, racial/ethnic populations, lower socioeconomic classes, and rural residents and, on the other hand, the overall U.S. population are major public health concerns. Emphasis is placed on research in and among three broad areas of action: 1) Public policy, 2) health care, and 3) disease/disability prevention. Particular attention is given to reducing "health gaps" among groups. Proposals that utilize an interdisciplinary approach, investigate multiple levels of analysis, incorporate a life-course perspective, and/or employ innovative methods such as system science or community-based participatory research are particularly encouraged. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/ Developmental (R21) grant mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PAR-10-136, that encourages applications under the R01. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): August 14, 2010, December 11, 2010, April 11, 2011, August 14, 2011, December 11, 2011, April 11, 2012, August 14, 2012, December 14, 2012 April 11, 2013. Application Due Date(s): September 14, 2010, January 11, 2011, May 11, 2011, September 14, 2011, January 11, 2012, May 11, 2012, September 14, 2012, January 14, 2013, May 11, 2013.

On March 19, 2010, NIDA participated in the issuance of a PA entitled Social Network Analysis and Health (R01). This FOA encourages research that aims to accomplish one or more specific goals: (1) generate new theories that would enhance the capabilities and value of Social Network Analysis (SNA); (2) address fundamental questions about social interactions and processes in social networks; (3) address fundamental questions about social networks in relation to health and health-related behaviors; (4) develop innovative methodologies and technologies to facilitate, improve, and expand the capabilities of SNA. This FOA will utilize the R01 grant mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PAR-10-146, that encourages applications under the R21 grant mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): May 3, 2010; April 11, 2011; April 11, 2012. Application Due Date(s): June 3, 2010; May 11, 2011; May 11, 2012.

On March 19, 2010, NIDA participated in the issuance of a PA entitled Social Network Analysis and Health (R21) (PAR-10-146). This FOA encourages basic research that will: generate new theories that can further social network analysis; address fundamental questions about the relationship between social networks and health; and develop methodological and technological innovations to facilitate and extend social network analyses. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) award mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PAR-10-145, that encourages applications under the R01 grant mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): May 3, 2010; April 11, 2011; April 11, 2012; Application Due Date(s): June 3, 2010; May 11, 2011; May 11, 2012.

On March 25, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Innovative Neuroscience K-12 Education (SBIR [R43/R44]) (PAR-10-154). NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research is a framework to enhance cooperative activities among the NIH Office of the Director and 15 NIH Institutes and Centers that support research on the nervous system (for further information, see http://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is released in affiliation with the Neuroscience Blueprint, with Institutes and Centers participating independently. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications from small business concerns (SBCs) that propose to develop innovative neuroscience educational tools to be used by or benefit children in kindergarten through 12th grade (K-12). Educational tools can be designed using any media (e.g., paper, electronic, etc.) or format (e.g., simulations, games, videos, notebooks, etc.) for use in or out of school settings, targeting children in groups or alone, with or without adult or teacher participation. Innovative neuroscience educational tools should promote neuroscience knowledge acquisition and application of that knowledge to one's own life, promote an interest in neuroscience learning and careers, and present a positive and realistic representation of the diversity of people who engage in neuroscience-related research and occupations. Educational tools targeted to increase the diversity of students (i.e., Native American, Black, Hispanic, female, disabled, or otherwise underrepresented) pursuing neuroscience learning are especially encouraged. This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): May 1, 2010; Application Due Date(s): June 1, 2010, April 4, 2011, April 4, 2012.

On April 6, 2010, NIDA in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Bioengineering Nanotechnology Initiative (STTR [R41/R42])(PA-10-149). Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this length scale. The purpose of this trans-NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to stimulate Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that employ nanotechnology to enable the development of diagnostics and interventions for treating diseases. This FOA will utilize the STTR (R41/R42) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-10-150, that encourages applications under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) (R43/R44) grant mechanisms.

On April 6, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Bioengineering Nanotechnology Initiative (STTR [R43/R44])(PA-10-150). Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this length scale. The purpose of this trans-NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to stimulate Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that employ nanotechnology to enable the development of diagnostics and interventions for treating diseases. This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-10-149, which encourages applications under the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) (R41/R42) grant mechanisms.

On April 13, 2010, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled International Neuroscience Fellowship (F05) (PAR-10-167). The goal of the International Neuroscience Fellowship (INF) is to advance the training of qualified foreign neuroscientists and clinicians at the early or mid-career level, by enhancing their basic, translational or clinical research skills in a research setting in the United States (U.S.). This program aims to strengthen the intellectual capital of neuroscience research in international institutions. Awardees are expected to pursue future independent and productive careers, which stimulate research in the neurosciences on a global scale. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will utilize the international research fellowship (F05) grant mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): July 16, 2010, 2011, 2012; Application Due Date(s): August 16, 2010, 2011, 2012.

On January 28, 2010, NIDA and several other NIH components jointly issued an RFA entitled Recovery Act Limited Competition: Program to Enhance NIH-supported Global Health Research Involving Human Subjects (S07) (RFA-OD-10-006). This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 ("Recovery Act" or "ARRA"), Public Law 111-5, invites applications from U.S. institutions for one year of support for resources and activities that will strengthen oversight of NIH supported human subjects research conducted collaboratively with institutions in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC). This FOA will utilize the NIH Biomedical Research Support Grants (S07) mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date: February 22, 2010; Application Due Date: March 22, 2010.

On January 26, NIDA and several other NIH components issued an RFA entitled Recovery Act Limited Competition: Framework Programs for Global Health Signature Innovations Initiative (R24) (RFA-OD-10-007). This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 ("Recovery Act" or "ARRA"), Public Law 111-5, invites applications from U.S. institutions and their partners to enhance the infrastructure and opportunities at the participating institutions for training postdoctoral investigators to carry out innovative, multidisciplinary research in Global Health. The initiative emphasizes hands on, problem solving, and collaborative approaches and may require the development of new training models and new partnerships within and beyond the university community. This FOA will utilize the NIH Resource-Related Research Project (R24) award mechanism. Letters of Intent Receipt Date: February 22, 2010; Application Due Date: March 22, 2010.

Other Program Activities

Clinical Trials Network (CTN) Update

Protocols: A total of 43 protocols have been initiated since 2001, including multi-site clinical trials (29), multi-site surveys (3), studies in special populations (5), and secondary analyses of data across various trials (6). In addition, 19 ancillary studies have been supported by CTN and non-CTN funds. There are about 11,500 participants enrolled in CTN studies.

Primary outcome papers are published and dissemination materials have been developed with CSAT's ATTC on the following:

  • Protocol CTN 0001, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Inpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0002, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Outpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0005, MI (Motivational Interviewing) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0006, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Drug Free Clinics
  • Protocol CTN 0007, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Methadone Clinics

Primary outcome papers are published or in press for:

  • Protocol CTN 0003, Bup/Nx: Comparison of Two Taper Schedules
  • Protocol CTN 0004, MET (Motivational Enhancement Treatment) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0008, A Baseline for Investigating Diffusion of Innovation
  • Protocol CTN 0009, Smoking Cessation Treatment with Transdermal Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0010, Buprenorphine/Naloxone-Facilitated Rehabilitation for Heroin Addicted Adolescents/Young Adults
  • Protocol CTN 0011, A Feasibility Study of a Telephone Enhancement Procedure (TELE) to Improve Participation in Continuing Care Activities
  • Protocol CTN 0012, Characteristics of Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C Viral Infection, and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0013, Motivational Enhancement Therapy to Improve Treatment Utilization and Outcome In Pregnant Substance Abusers
  • Protocol CTN 0015, Women's Treatment for Trauma and Substance Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial
  • Protocol CTN 0016, Patient Feedback: A Performance Improvement Study in Outpatient Addiction Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0018, Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Men in Drug Abuse Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0019, Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Women in Drug Abuse Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0021, Motivational Enhancement Treatment to Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome for Spanish-Speaking Individuals Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse. This is the first Spanish-only protocol in the CTN.
  • Protocol CTN 0029, A Pilot Study of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) in Initiating and Maintaining Abstinence in Smokers with ADHD.

In addition, the following protocols have submitted primary paper:

  • Protocol CTN 0017, HIV and HCV Intervention in Drug Treatment Settings
  • Protocol CTN 0030A2, Effects of Chronic Opioids in Subjects with a History of Opioid Use

The following protocols have locked data:

  • Protocol CTN 0014, Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers (BSFT)
  • Protocol CTN 0028, Randomized Controlled Trial of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders (SUD).
  • Protocol CTN 0030, Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) is a randomized 2-phase, open-label, multi-center study in outpatient treatment settings. Pre-screening began in May 2006. The study, carried out in 9 sites, has randomized 653 participants into phase 1 and 360 participants into phase 2 and is currently in the close-out phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0030A1, Collection of Economic Data for the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study. This ancillary study was conducted in collaboration with NIDA DESPR and it is in the data analysis phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0032, HIV Rapid Testing and Counseling in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs in the U.S. This study randomized 1281 participants to evaluate the most effective strategy to ensure that persons in drug treatment programs are tested for HIV and receive their HIV test results. The protocol has completed enrollment and is currently in the data analysis phase.

The following protocols has ended new enrollment, and are in the follow-up or data-lock phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0027, Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies (START) is a randomized, open-label, multi-center study that was developed in collaboration with the Division of Pharmacotherapies & Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMCDA). 1,269 participants were randomized. Data collection is expected to end in June, 2010.
  • Protocol CTN 0027A1, START Pharmacogenetics: Exploratory Genetic Studies In Starting Treatment With Agonist Replacement Therapies. This ancillary study consented 843 of the 1,269 subjects from the START study. Data collection is expected to end in June, 2010.
  • Protocol CTN 0030A3, POATS Long-Term Follow Up Study (LTFU) is being conducted at all POATS sites to examine long-term outcomes for individuals who participated in CTN-0030 with opioid analgesic (OA) dependence. This study will follow POATS participants for 42 months after randomization in the POATS study.
  • Protocol CTN 0031, Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step (STAGE-12): Evaluation of a Combined Individual-Group Intervention to Reduce Stimulant and Other Drug Use by Increasing 12-Step Involvement. Recruitment was completed on September 30, 2009, yielding a total of 471 randomized participants across 10 sites. This total represents 21 more participants than proposed and was reached one week earlier than planned.
  • Protocol CTN 0031A1, An Evaluation of Neurocognitive Function, Oxidative Damage, and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Methamphetamine and Cocaine Abusers. Recruitment was completed on September 30, 2009, yielding a total of 173 participants across 6 sites who completed the data collection and blood draw procedures.
  • Protocol CTN 0031A2, The Role of Alcohol Consumption in Classifications of Alcohol Use Disorders: A Clinical Study. In collaboration with DESPR. The baseline data obtained in this research formed the foundation for an R01 grant awarded to Joseph Guydish, PhD, at the University of California, San Francisco.
  • Protocol CTN 0031A3, Organizational and Practitioner Influences on Implementation of STAGE-12. The study assesses the influence of counselor and organizational variables on fidelity of the STAGE-12 intervention during the clinical trial, tests the impact of fidelity on clinical trial participant outcomes, and explores the influence of counselor and organizational variables on sustainability of the STAGE-12 intervention following completion of the clinical trial. Study staff has already collected the organizational and counselor level data from all ten STAGE-12 sites. The baseline data obtained in this research formed the foundation for an R01 grant awarded by DESPR to Joseph Guydish, PhD, at the University of California, San Francisco.
  • Protocol CTN 0032A1, Economic Analysis of HIV Rapid Testing in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs. This ancillary study is an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of on-site HIV testing in drug abuse treatment settings vs. referral for off-site testing. The PI is Dr. Bruce Schackman. The project is conducted in collaboration with NIDA's DESPR.
  • Protocol CTN 0034-Ot, Developing Research Capacity and Culturally Appropriate Research Methods: Community-based Participatory Research Manual for Collaborative Research in Drug Abuse for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the Pacific Northwest Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0035-Ot, Access to HIV and Hepatitis Screening and Care among Ethnic Minority Drug Users In and Out of Drug Treatment. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and is being conducted in the California/Arizona Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0036-Ot, Epidemiology and Ethnographic Survey of "Cheese" Heroin Use among Hispanics in Dallas County. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and is being conducted in the Texas Node.

The following protocols are currently enrolling:

  • CTN-0027A2, Retention of Suboxone Patients in START: Perspectives of Providers and Patients. The overall purposes of the supplemental study are to identify and assess barriers for retaining Suboxone patients. This ancillary study is in the development phase.
  • Protocol CTN 0033-Ot, Methamphetamine Use among American Indians. The first area of research emphasis in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Strategic Plan on Reducing Health Disparities (2004 Revision) is the epidemiology of drug abuse, health consequences and infectious diseases among minority populations. The study is a collaboration among four Nodes: Pacific NW, Southwest, Oregon/Hawaii, and Ohio Valley.
  • Protocol CTN 0046, Smoking-Cessation and Stimulant Treatment (S-CAST): Evaluation of the Impact of Concurrent Outpatient Smoking-Cessation and Stimulant Treatment on Stimulant-Dependence Outcomes. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of substance abuse treatment as usual plus smoking cessation treatment (TAU+SCT), relative to substance abuse treatment as usual (TAU), on drug abuse outcomes.

The following protocols are in the development phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0037, Exercise as a Treatment for Substance Use Disorders. This clinical trial will test the effectiveness of the addition of exercise in improving drug abuse treatment outcomes.
  • Protocol CTN-0038-Ot, Barriers to Substance Abuse Treatment among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. The objective of this study is to gain a better understanding of the factors that may influence the under-utilization of substance abuse treatment services by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and the readiness of substance abuse treatment programs serving AAPIs to participate in clinical trials and adopt evidence based practices. This study is a collaboration with NIH NCMHD.
  • Protocol CTN 0044, Web-delivery of Evidence-Based, Psychosocial Treatment for Substance Use Disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of adding an interactive, web-based version of the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) intervention plus abstinence incentives as an adjunct to community-based, outpatient substance abuse treatment.
  • Protocol CTN 0045-Ot,Rates of HIV Testing and Barriers to Testing in African Americans Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment. This is an observational study seeking to: (1) Compare the proportion of African American and non-African Americans receiving treatment at substance abuse treatment clinics that have been tested for HIV within the past 12 months; (2) Observe relationships between rates of African Americans who have not been tested and a) the types of testing offered at substance abuse treatment clinics and b) the types of outreach strategies used to engage persons in HIV testing; and (3) assess African American clients' self-reported barriers to accessing HIV testing, in relation to other ethnicities.
  • Protocol CTN-0047, Screening, Motivational Assessment, Referral and Treatment in Emergency Departments (SMART-ED). The study objective is to evaluate the implementation of and outcomes associated with a screening and brief intervention (SBI) process to identify individuals with substance use, abuse, or dependence seen in emergency departments (EDs) and to provide interventions and/or referral to treatment consistent with the severity of their substance use disorder.
  • Protocol CTN-0048, Screening, Motivational Assessment, Referral and Treatment in Dental Clinics. This concept is currently being developed into a protocol, in collaboration with the NIDCR and their clinical networks.
  • Protocols CTN-0037-A1, CTN-0044-A1 and CTN0046-A1, Organizational and Practitioner Influences on Patient Outcomes. This series of ancillary studies will assess associations between site organizational and practitioner variables and site differences in clinical trial outcomes.

In addition to the primary CTN trials, there are currently five secondary analyses underway using data across several of the completed trials. Manuscripts are in progress and/or being prepared by the investigators. Posters are being presented at scientific meetings for several of the trials.

  1. Gender Differences in the Prevalence and Predictors of HIV Risk Behaviors, PI: Audrey Brooks (CA/AZ Node);
  2. Pattern of alcohol use and alcohol-related diagnoses among drug abusing/dependent participants, PIs: Dennis Donovan and Bryan Hartzler (Pacific Northwest Node);
  3. The relationships between demographic characteristics of patients and therapists, measures of therapeutic process and therapeutic alliance, and outcomes, PIs: Alyssa Forcehimes (Southwest Node) and Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node);
  4. The Efficacy of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for African Americans, PI: Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node);
  5. Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes in Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations, PI: Carmen Masson (California-Arizona Node).

There are also about 44 funded studies supported by independent grants that use CTN studies as a platform.




NIDA's New and Competing Continuation Grants Awarded Since February 2010

Abood, Mary E. -- Temple University
Pamoic Acid Analogues as Potent GPR35 Agonists Inducing Antinociception

Akbarian, Schahram -- University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
Transgenic Mice to Label Cell-Specific Nuclei in Brain

Akins, Chana K. -- University of Kentucky
Enhancement of Sexual Motivation

Al-Harthi, Lena -- Rush University Medical Center
Protective Pathways Against Methamphetamines Abuse and HIV Neuropathogenesis

Benamar, Khalid -- Temple University
Gp120 in the Brain and Opioid Medications: Functional Interactions

Biernacka, Joanna M. -- Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester
Methods for Detecting Interacting Risk Factors for Addictions

Blitzer, Robert D. -- Mount Sinai School of Medicine of NYU
Reversing Cocaine-Induced Plasticity with GSK3 Inhibitors

Bogen, Debra L. -- University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
Randomized Clinical Trial of High vs. Standard-Calorie Formula for Methadone-Expo

Boger, Dale L. -- Scripps Research Institute
Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)

Bolanos, Carlos A. -- Florida State University
Ontogeny of Drug Exposure and Mood Dysregulation

Booth, Robert E. -- University of Colorado, Denver
Peer Leaders as HIV Risk Reduction Change Agents Among IDUs in Ukraine

Bourgois, Philippe -- University of Pennsylvania
The Logics for HIV Risk Among Street-Based Heroin Injectors

Bowman, Anna Louise -- Northeastern University
Virtual Screening to Identify Novel, Selective Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibitors

Brown, Louis Davis -- Pennsylvania State University-University Park
Using Coalitions to Support Evidence-Based Programs and Prevent Drug Abuse

Chandra, Siddharth -- Michigan State University
Drug Consumption and Disease Mortality: Population-Level Analyses

Chou, Chih-Ping -- University of Southern California
Effects of Developmental Stage and Transitions on Drug Use Trajectories

Ciccarone, Daniel H -- University of California, San Francisco
Heroin Price, Purity and Outcomes Study

Civelli, Olivier -- University of California, Irvine
A Novel Neuropeptide System Involved in Drug Abuse

Coors, Marilyn E -- University of Colorado, Denver
Ethical Issues in Broad Data Sharing for Addiction Research: Best Research Practice

Czoty, Paul W. -- Wake Forest University Health Sciences
Brain Imaging and Cognitive Effects of Cocaine Self-Administration in Monkeys

Daughters, Stacey B -- University of Maryland College, Park Campus
Depression Treatment for Urban Low Income Minority Substance Users

Dunlap, Eloise Emma -- National Development and Research Institutes
Stages of Drug Market Disruption and Reformulation in Disaster Cities

Edlin, Brian R. -- Suny Downstate Medical Center
Integrated vs. Separate Care for Hepatitis C, Substance Abuse, and HIV Prevention

Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W. -- The Mind Research Network
Adolescent Response to Psychotherapy: The Role of Neuronal Networks

Fishbein, Diana H. -- Research Triangle Institute
Transdisciplinary Approach to Understand Variability in Preventive Intervention

France, Charles P. -- University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Opioid Withdrawal

Freeman, Willard M. -- Pennsylvania State University, Hershey Medical Center
Gene Promoter DNA Methylation with Cocaine Self-Administration and Abstinence

Fuchs Lokensgard, Rita A. -- University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Drug Context-Induced Instrumental Cocaine Seeking: Influence of Memory Reconsolidation

Galizio, Joseph Mark -- University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Drugs of Abuse and Memory Span

Glasner-Edwards, Suzette V. -- University of California, Los Angeles
Mindfulness Based Relapse Prevention for Stimulant Users

Golder, Seana -- University of Louisville
Victimization and Women in the Criminal Justice System

Grafsky, Erika L. -- Ohio State University
Formative Research on Substance Use and Disclosure for GLB Youth and Their Families

Grandy, David Kilgore -- Oregon Health and Science University
Role of TAAR1 in Methamphetamine Self-Administration

Gruol, Donna L. -- Scripps Research Institute
An Integrative Structure/Functional Analysis of Mu-Opioid Receptor Variants

Hackenberg, Timothy D. -- Reed College
Behavioral Economics in a Laboratory-Based Token Economy

Haggerty, Kevin P. -- University of Washington
Exploring Implementation of Drug Abuse Prevention in Treatment Settings

Hahn, Britta -- University of Maryland, Baltimore
Nicotinic Modulation of the Default Network of Resting Brain Function

Hayashida, Kenichiro -- Wake Forest University Health Sciences
Mechanisms and Consequences of Locus Coeruleus Activation

He, Johnny J. -- Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis
HIV Interaction with Drugs of Abuse and Adult Neurogenesis

Henderson, Craig E. -- Sam Houston State University
Integrative Data Analysis of Gender and Ethnic Differences in MDFT RCTs

Hennrikus, Deborah J. -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
An Integrated Work Safety - Smoking Cessation Program for Small Worksites

Hillard, Cecilia J. -- Medical College of Wisconsin
Cannabinoid Regulation of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3

Ho, Wenzhe -- Temple University
Opioids, LPS and HIV

Horgan, Constance M. -- Brandeis University
Provision of Drug Abuse Treatment Services Under Parity

Hough, Lindsay -- Albany Medical College
P450 Epoxygenase Mechanisms of Opioid Analgesia

Howell, Leonard L. -- Emory University
Cocaine Use and Monoamine Function

Hurd, Yasmin L. -- Mount Sinai School of Medicine of NYU
Cannabidiol as Treatment Intervention for Opiate Relapse

Itzhak, Yossef -- University of Miami School of Medicine
A Novel Paradigm for Context and Cue Conditioning: Relevance for Drug Addiction

Izenwasser, Sari -- University of Miami School of Medicine
Social and Environmental Factors in Adolescent Stimulant Abuse

Jacobson, Jeffrey M. -- Drexel University
Long-Acting HIV Therapy for Injection Drug Users

Jacobson, Mark W. -- University of California, San Diego
Impact of White Matter Integrity on Functional MRI in HIV and Methamphetamine

Kalivas, Peter W. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Glutamate and Craving for Cocaine

Kaul, Marcus -- Burnham Institute for Medical Research
Combined Effect of Methamphetamine, HIV and HAART on Neurons and Macrophages

Kellar, Kenneth J. -- Georgetown University
Novel Ligands That Selectively Desensitize Alpha4beta nACHRs for Smoking Cessation

Khoshbouei, Habibeh -- Meharry Medical College
Methamphetamine and Amphetamine Differentially Affect Dopamine Transporter Activity

Kidorf, Michael S. -- Johns Hopkins University
Community-Based Intervention at Needle Exchange Sites

King, Jean A. -- University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
Possible Significance of Cholinergic Influence in ADHD

Kippin, Tod E. -- University of California, Santa Barbara
Chromatin Remodeling in the Prefrontal Cortex in Cocaine Addiction

Kippin, Tod E. -- University of California, Santa Barbara
Interactions Between Prenatal Stress and Genetics in Cocaine Responsiveness

Kish, Stephen John -- Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Pet Imaging Study of Brain VMAT2 in Human Methamphetamine Users

Lai, Shenghan -- Johns Hopkins University
Subclinical Atherosclerosis in HIV Plus Black Cocaine Users

Larimer, Mary E. -- University of Washington
RCT of WEB vs. In-Person SUDCSnd Cormorbity Treatment

Ledoux, Joseph E. -- New York University
Brain Mechanisms of Avoidance: Implications for Addiction

Lee, Daeyeol -- Yale University
Decision Making and Orbitofrontal Cortex

Lindberg, Iris -- University of Maryland, Baltimore
Opioid Peptide Synthesizing Enzymes

Loffredo, Christopher A. -- Georgetown University
Prevalence and Correlates of Youth Drug Abuse in Egypt

Lucas, Gregory M. -- Johns Hopkins University
Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease in HIV-Infected Individuals

Mackie, Kenneth P. -- Indiana University, Bloomington
Do Organophosphates Impair Neurodevelopment through Inhibition of Endocannabinoid

Maes, Hermine H. -- Virginia Commonwealth University
Developmental Genetic Epidemiology of Smoking

Mantsch, John R. -- Marquette University
GCF, CRF and Stressor-Induced Relapse

Marriott, Karla-Sue Camille -- Savannah State University
Synthesis of Novel Agents for Use in Addiction Treatment

Marshal, Michael P. -- University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
HIV Risk Behavior and Drug Use Over Time: Syndemic Production in High Risk Youth

Mello, Nancy K. -- McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA)
Sex/Gender and Nicotine Addiction: Hormones, Behavior and Neuroimaging

Merchant, Roland C. -- Rhode Island Hospital
Increasing Viral Testing in the Emergency Department

Montaner, Luis J. -- Wistar Institute
NK Cell Activation and Function in HIV-1 Exposed Uninfected IV Drug Users

Morgan, Peter T. -- Yale University
Modafinil, Sleep Architecture, and Cocaine Relapse

Muilenburg, Jessica L. -- University of Georgia (UGA)
Smoking Cessation Interventions and Program Availability for Drug and Alcohol ADD

Nunes, Edward V. -- New York State Psychiatric Institute
Training Motivational Interviewing Using Live Supervision

Ozechowski, Timothy J. -- Oregon Research Institute
Therapist-Family Interactions in Functional Family Therapy for Drug Abusing Youth

Pan, Ying-Xian -- Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research
Exploring Functions of Mu Opioid Receptor Carboxyl Termini by Gene Targeting

Pasternak, Gavril W. -- Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research
Pharmacology of Opioid Receptor Subtype

Patterson, Thomas L. -- University of California, San Diego
Safer Sex Intervention for Male Clients of Female Sex Workers in Tijuana, Mexico

Petrache, Irina -- Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis
Molecular Mechanism of Alveolar Injury Caused by Cigarette Smoke

Polcin, Douglas L. -- Public Health Institute
Community Impact on Adoption of Sober Living Houses

Prisinzano, Thomas Edward -- University of Kansas, Lawrence
Investigation of Neoclerodanes as Novel Opioid Ligands

Raines, Douglas E. -- Massachusetts General Hospital
Preclinical Studies of Carbo-Etomidate: An Etomidate Analogue for Use in Sepsis

Rauh, Virginia A. -- Columbia University Health Sciences
Assess the Effects of ETs on Neurodevelopment

Reed, Brian -- Rockefeller University
18F-Beta-Endorphin Imaging: Translational Study of an Opioid Peptide Radiotracer

Reynolds, Brady A. -- Research Institute Nationwide Children's Hospital
Web-Based Contingency Management for Smoking Abstinence with Adolescents

Roitman, Jamie D. -- University of Illinois at Chicago
Cortico-Striatal Signaling in Risk Preference

Rosen, Marc I. -- Yale University
Improving Clinician Ratings of Money Mismanagement: Addiction's Impact

Roth, Bryan L. -- University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Diterpines as Selective Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonists

Rudnick, Gary W. -- Yale University
Neurotransmitter Transport

Santisteban, Daniel A. -- University of Miami, Coral Gables
Culturally Informed Family Based Treatment of Adolescents: A Randomized Trial

Sazonov, Edward S. -- Clarkson University
The Development of a Noninvasive Monitoring System for Cigarette Smoking

Schiffer, Wynne K. -- Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
Imaging the Causes and Consequences of Adolescent Inhalant Abuse

Schnoll, Robert A. -- University of Pennsylvania
Efficacy of Varenicline for Smokeless Tobacco Use in India

Schwendt, Marek -- Medical University of South Carolina
Striatal RGS4 Interacts with mGLuR5 Signaling in Relapse to Cocaine-Seeking

Self, David W. -- University of Texas SW Medical Center, Dallas
Role of Endogenous Opiate Systems in Cocaine Relapse After Long-Term Abstinence

Shetty, Vivek -- University of California, Los Angeles
The Oral and Dental Consequences of Methamphetamine Use

Simone, Donald A. -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Cannabinoid Modulation of Hyperalgesia

Stanger, Catherine -- University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock
The Neuroeconomics of Behavioral Therapies for Adolescent Substance Abuse

Sternberg, Paul Warren -- California Institute of Technology
Machine Vision Analysis of C. Elegans Phenotypic Patterns

Stout, Robert L. -- Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation
Longitudinal Study of Mechanisms of Drug Abuse Recovery-Pilot

Strathearn, Lane -- Baylor College of Medicine
Maternal Brain and Behavioral Responses to Infant Cues in Cocaine Exposed Mothers

Stuber, Garret D. -- Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center
Optogenetic Control of Excitatory Synapses in the Accumbens During Behavior

Subramanian, Kumara Vadivel -- Northeastern University
Synthesis of Novel 2-Arachidonoylglycerol Analogs

Sumikawa, Katumi -- University of California, Irvine
Mechanisms of Nicotine-Induced Neuroplasticity

Sundquist, Jan O. -- Lund University
Genetics, Family Environment, and Neighborhood: Impact on Mental Disorders

Taylor, Jane R. -- Yale University
Cognitive Dysfunction After Chronic Cocaine

Teplin, Linda A. -- Northwestern University
Drug Abuse, Incarceration and Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS: A Longitudinal Study

Terry, Alvin V. -- Medical College of Georgia (MCG)
Drug Discovery for Cognitive Impairment Associated with Drugs of Abuse

Thornberry, Terence P. -- University of Maryland, College Park Campus
Intergenerational Transmission of Risk for Drug Use

Tiburu, Elvis K. -- Northeastern University
Ligand-Assisted Structural Studies of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor 2, Using NMR

Todorovic, Slobodan M. -- University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Validation of Voltage-Dependent T-Channel Blockers in Treatment of Neuropathic Pain

Unger, Jennifer Beth -- Claremont Graduate University
Drug Use Among Hispanic Emerging Adults

Varga, Eva V. -- University of Arizona
A Novel Pharmacological Target to Prevent Sustained-Morphine-Mediated Pain Sensitivity

Walker, Denise D. -- University of Washington
Reaching and Motivating Change in Teen Marijuana Smokers

Wallis, Jonathan D. -- University of California, Berkeley
Neural Representation of Reward in Frontal Cortex

Weinberger, Andrea Hope -- Yale University
Gender Differences in the Association of Depression to Transitions in Smoking

Weller, Joshua -- Decision Research
Risky Decision Making in Girls with Foster Care Involvement: Prevention Implications

Wickman, Kevin D. -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Trek Channels and Opioid Signaling in the Ventral Tegmental Area

Wilbrecht, Linda E. -- Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center
Effects of Adolescent Cocaine on Frontal Spine Turnover, Synapses, and Behavior

Williams, John T. -- Oregon Health and Science University
Cocaine Effects on Neurons

Wiltgen, Brian J. -- University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Motivational Control of Goal-Directed Actions and Habits

Winder, Danny G. -- Vanderbilt University
Noradrenergic Regulation in the BNST

Wood, Evan -- University of British Columbia
Initiation of Injection Drug Use and HIV Risks Among Street-Involved Youth

Xie, Xiang-Qun -- University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
Structure/Function of the CB2 Receptor Binding and G-Protein Recognition Pockets

Yaksh, Tony L. -- University of California, San Diego
The Pharmacology of Spinal Analgesics

Yi, Richard -- University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock
Soft Commitment as a Mechanism to Prevent Preference Reversals in Smokers

Young, Michael E. -- Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
Waiting for a Better Future: Deciding When to "Cash in" When Outcomes Are Continuing


Index

Research Findings

Program Activities

Extramural Policy and Review Activities

Congressional Affairs

International Activities

Meetings and Conferences

Media and Education Activities

Planned Meetings

Publications

Staff Highlights

Grantee Honors



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