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NIDA Home > Publications > Director's Reports > May, 2009 Index    

Director's Report to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse - May, 2009



Program Activities

NIDA PAs/RFAs

On March 4, 2009, NIH issued an RFA entitled Recovery Act Limited Competition: NIH Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research (RC1) (RFA-OD-09-003). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is developed as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), Pub. L. No. 111-5. All NIH Institutes and Centers with funding authority will participate with the NIH Office of the Director in this initiative. This FOA will be administered by the Office of the Director of the NIH (http://www.nih.gov). NIH has received new funds for Fiscal Years (FYs) 2009 and 2010 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). NIH has designated at least $200 million for a new initiative called the NIH Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research (see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/challenge_award/). This new program will support research on topic areas which address specific scientific and health research challenges in biomedical and behavioral research that would benefit from significant 2-year jumpstart funds. NIH Institute and Centers have selected specific Challenge Topics within each of the Challenge Areas. The research in these Challenge Areas should have a high impact in biomedical or behavioral science and/or public health. As part of the Recovery Act, the NIH invites, through this limited competition, NIH Challenge Grant (RC1) applications from domestic (United States) institutions/organizations proposing novel research in areas that address specific knowledge gaps, scientific opportunities, new technologies, data generation, or research methods that would benefit from an influx of funds to quickly advance the area in significant ways. This program is designed to support research in scientific areas identified by the Institutes and Centers, as described below. This FOA will utilize the NIH Challenge Grant (RC1) award mechanism.

On March 20, 2009, NIH issued an RFA entitled Recovery Act Limited Competition for NIH Grants: Research and Research Infrastructure "Grand Opportunities" (RC2) (RFA-OD-09-004). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is developed as part of the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). NIH Institutes and Centers with funding authority listed below will participate with the NIH Office of the Director in this initiative. Reviews and awards will be administered by the participating Institutes and Centers. The NIH has received new funds for Fiscal Years (FYs) 2009 and 2010 as part of the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 ("Recovery Act" or "ARRA"). This is one of a number of NIH initiatives related to the Recovery Act. These are listed at the following site: http://grants.nih.gov/recovery/. Under the Recovery Act, the NIH has established a new program entitled Research and Research Infrastructure "Grand Opportunities" hereafter called the "GO" grants program. This new program will support projects that address large, specific biomedical and biobehavioral research endeavors that will benefit from significant 2-year funds without the expectation of continued NIH funding beyond two years. The research supported by the "GO" grants program should have high short-term impact, and a high likelihood of enabling growth and investment in biomedical research and development, public health, and health care delivery. This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 ("Recovery Act" or "ARRA"), Public Law 111-5, solicits through this limited competition applications from domestic (United States) institutions/organizations proposing to develop and implement critical research innovations to advance the research enterprise, stimulate future growth and investments, and advance public health and health care delivery. The purpose of the "GO" grants program is to support high impact ideas that lend themselves to short-term funding, and may lay the foundation for new fields of investigation. The "GO" grants program will support large-scale research projects that accelerate critical breakthroughs, early and applied research on cutting-edge technologies, and new approaches to improve the synergy and interactions among multi and interdisciplinary research teams. The initiative seeks novel approaches in areas that address specific knowledge gaps, scientific opportunities, new technologies, data generation, or research methods that would benefit from an influx of funds to quickly advance the area in significant ways. Applicants may propose to address either a specific research question or propose the creation of a unique infrastructure/resource designed to accelerate scientific progress in the future. This program is a trans-NIH effort supported by Recovery Act funds. For those projects that span the missions of Institutes, Centers and Offices (ICs), support may come from Recovery Act funds allocated to the Common Fund.

On March 30, 2009, NIH issued an RFA entitled Recovery Act Limited Competition: Supporting New Faculty Recruitment to Enhance Research Resources through Biomedical Research Core Centers (P30) (RFA-OD-09-005). This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 ("Recovery Act" or "ARRA"), Public Law 111-5, invites applications from U.S academic institutions/organizations to support the hiring of newly-recruited faculty to develop research projects within the context of Biomedical Core Centers. For this announcement, a Biomedical Core Center is defined as a community of multidisciplinary researchers focusing on areas of biomedical research relevant to NIH, such as centers, departments, programs, and/or trans-departmental collaborations or consortia. . These awards are designed to enhance innovative programs of excellence by providing scientific and programmatic support for promising research faculty and their areas of research. Specifically for the purposes of this announcement, Core Center Grants are institutional awards that provide funding to hire, provide appropriate start-up packages, and develop pilot research projects for newly independent investigators, with the goal of augmenting and expanding the institution's community of multidisciplinary researchers focusing on areas of biomedical research relevant to NIH. This FOA will utilize the NIH Core Center Grant (P30) mechanism.

On April 20, NIH issued an RFA entitled Recovery Act Limited Competition: Academic Research Enhancement Award (R15) (RFA-OD-09-007). This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is supported by funds provided to the NIH under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 ("Recovery Act" or "ARRA"), Public Law 111-5. The purpose of the Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) program is to stimulate research in educational institutions that provide baccalaureate or advanced degrees for a significant number of the Nation's research scientists, but that have not been major recipients of NIH support. These AREA grants create opportunities for scientists and institutions otherwise unlikely to participate extensively in NIH programs, to contribute to the Nation's biomedical and behavioral research effort. AREA grants are intended to support small-scale health-related research projects proposed by faculty members of eligible, domestic institutions. This FOA will utilize the Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) R15 award mechanism.

On April 1, 2009, NIH issued an RFA entitled Novel Statistical Methods for Human Gene Expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) Analysis (R01) (RFA-RM-09-006). This FOA solicits applications to develop innovative statistical methods to detect the influence of genetic variation on tissue-specific gene expression and regulation. The goal of the FOA is to seek proposals to develop statistical methods to appropriately analyze the forthcoming complex data sets generated by the NIH Roadmap initiative entitled "Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project". Applicants are encouraged to take advantage of existing tissue-specific gene expression datasets and/or simulated datasets, but will also be strongly encouraged to utilize GTEx-generated data, if and when it is available. This FOA will utilize the R01 grant mechanism.

On April 16, NIH issued a PA entitled NIH Small Research Grant Program (Parent R03) (PA-09-163). The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Investigator-Initiated Small Grant (R03) funding opportunity supports small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources. Investigator-initiated research, also known as unsolicited research, is research funded as a result of an investigator submitting a research grant application to NIH in an investigator's area of interest and competency. The R03 grant mechanism supports different types of projects including pilot and feasibility studies; secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; development of research methodology; and development of new research technology. All investigator-initiated small grant applications described in this announcement will be assigned to NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) according to standard Public Health Service (PHS) referral guidelines and specific program interests. Investigators are strongly encouraged to consult the list of participating ICs and special research interests. This FOA will utilize the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism.

NIH issued a PA entitled NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (Parent R21) (PA-09-164). The Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) mechanism is intended to encourage exploratory and developmental research projects by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research. All investigator-initiated exploratory/developmental grant applications described in this announcement will be assigned to NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) according to standard Public Health Service (PHS) referral guidelines and specific program interests. Investigators are strongly encouraged to consult the list of participating ICs and special research interests. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism.

New NIDA PAs and RFAs

On March 23, 2009, NIDA issued a PA entitled Building System Capacity for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Substance Abuse Treatment and Prevention (R34) (PA-09-105). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) provides resources to facilitate research on the adoption, implementation, and sustainability of evidence-based clinical treatment practices, prevention approaches, and business practices in community-based service delivery settings. It is intended to foster collaboration between service providers and entities that directly influence their capacity to deliver such practices, including Single State Agencies, other funders, licensing and regulatory bodies, referral sources, educational entities, and other social services agencies that interact with the treatment and prevention systems. Applications are encouraged that will advance the field of implementation science while simultaneously building the capacity of systems and service providers to conduct process improvement research. Applicants may propose to pilot test proven clinical or business practices across service delivery settings, or to study the downstream effect of changes in State or other system-level policies on program capacity to implement evidence-based practices. This FOA encourages collection of preliminary data needed to inform approaches to the eventual scaling-up of selected practices to broader, sustained implementation. This FOA will utilize the R34 grant mechanism.

On April 6, 2009, NIDA issued a PA entitled Pilot and Feasibility Studies in Preparation for Drug Abuse Prevention Trials (R34) (PA-09-146). This FOA for R34 applications seeks to support: (a) pilot and/or feasibility testing of new, revised, or adapted preventive intervention approaches targeting the initiation of drug use, the progression to abuse or dependence, and the acquisition or transmission of HIV infection among diverse populations and settings; and (b) pre-trial feasibility testing for prevention services and systems research. The NIDA R34 mechanism does not support the development of intervention protocols, manuals, or the standardization of protocols. It is expected that research conducted via this R34 mechanism will consist of early stage efficacy, effectiveness or services research that will provide intervention pilot and/or feasibility data that is a pre-requisite for submitting larger drug abuse and/or drug-related HIV prevention intervention studies. This FOA will utilize the NIH Planning Grant (R34) award mechanism and runs in parallel with FOAs of identical scientific scope, PA-08-217, PA-08-218, and PA-08-219 that encourage applications under the NIH Research Project Grant (R01), Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21), and Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanisms, respectively.

On April 7, 2009, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Economic Studies of Health Insurance Coverage on Drug Abuse Treatment Availability, Access, Costs, and Quality (R01) (RFA-DA-10-004). This FOA solicits research project grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to conduct rigorous, theory-driven research on the effects of recent legislative and regulatory changes affecting insurance coverage for drug abuse treatment services. This FOA will utilize the R01 grant mechanism.

PAs/RFAs Issued with Other NIH Components/Agencies

On January 13, 2009, NIDA and NIAAA jointly issued a Program Announcement (PA) entitled Senior Scientist Research and Mentorship Award (K05) (PA-09-076). This PA is intended to provide protected time for outstanding senior scientists who have demonstrated a sustained high level of productivity conducting biomedical research relevant to the scientific mission of the appropriate institute to focus on their research and to provide mentoring of new investigators. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will utilize the NIH Senior Scientist Award (K05) mechanism.

On January 22, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), issued a PA entitled PHS 2009-02 Omnibus Solicitation of the NIH, CDC, FDA and ACF for Small Business Innovation Research Grant Applications (Parent SBIR [R43/R44]) (PA-09-080). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications. United States SBCs that have the research capabilities and technological expertise to contribute to the R&D mission(s) of the NIH, CDC, FDA and ACF awarding components identified in this FOA are encouraged to submit SBIR grant applications in response to identified topics (see PHS 2009-2 SBIR/STTR Program Descriptions and Research Topics for NIH, CDC, FDA and ACF.) This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, Fast-Track, and Phase II Competing Renewal applications (NIH only), and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-081, that solicits applications under the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) (R41/R42) grant mechanisms. Note: STTR applications are accepted ONLY by the NIH. The CDC, FDA and ACF do not participate in the STTR program. SBIR Fast-Track and Phase II Competing Renewal grant applications are accepted by the NIH only.

On January 22, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled PHS 2009-02 Omnibus Solicitation of the NIH for Small Business Technology Transfer Grant Applications (Parent STTR [R41/R42]) ( PA-09-081). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications. United States SBCs that have the research capabilities and technological expertise to contribute to the R&D mission(s) of the NIH awarding components identified in this FOA are encouraged to submit STTR grant applications in response to identified topics (see PHS 2009-2 SBIR/STTR Program Descriptions and Research Topics for NIH.) This FOA will utilize the STTR (R41/R42) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-080, that encourages applications under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) (R43/R44) grant mechanisms.

On February 11, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with a number of ther NIH components, issued a PA entitled New Technologies for Liver Disease STTR (R41/R42) (PA-09-094). The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit Small Business Innovation Research (STTR) grant applications from small business concerns (SBCs) that propose to develop resources, research tools, instrumentations, biomarkers, devices, drugs or new and innovative approaches to diagnosis, monitoring, management, treatment and prevention of liver diseases. Areas of interest include development of reliable and practical means of diagnosis of liver diseases; biomarkers for disease activity and stage; noninvasive tests for inflammation, fibrosis and fat in the liver; and drugs, complementary and alternative modalities, biologics or molecular reagents for the therapy or prevention of liver diseases. The goal of this announcement is to enlist members of the small business research community in advancing means of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of liver disease and facilitate the goals outlined in the trans-NIH Action Plan for Liver Disease Research. This FOA will utilize the STTR (R41/R42) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-095, that encourages applications under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) (R43/R44) grant mechanisms.

On February 12, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled New Technologies for Liver Disease SBIR (R43/R44) (PA-09-095). The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications from small business concerns (SBCs) that propose to develop resources, research tools, instrumentations, biomarkers, devices, drugs or new and innovative approaches to diagnosis, monitoring, management, treatment and prevention of liver diseases. Areas of interest include development of reliable and practical means of diagnosis of liver diseases; biomarkers for disease activity and stage; noninvasive tests for inflammation, fibrosis and fat in the liver; and drugs, complementary and alternative modalities, biologics or molecular reagents for the therapy or prevention of liver diseases. The goal of this announcement is to enlist members of the small business research community in advancing means of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of liver disease and facilitate the goals outlined in the trans-NIH Action Plan for Liver Disease Research. This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-094, which encourages applications under the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) (R41/R42) grant mechanisms.

On February 13, 2009, NIDA and NIAAA jointly issued a PA entitled Mechanisms of Alcohol and Nicotine Co-Dependence (R21) (PA-09-098). This FOA encourages Exploratory/ Developmental (R21) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to study neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms contributing to concurrent alcohol and nicotine use and dependence. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-099, that encourages applications under the Research Project Grant (R01) mechanism.

On February 13, 2009, NIDA and NIAAA jointly issued a PA entitled Mechanisms of Alcohol and Nicotine Co-Dependence (R01) (PA-09-099). This FOA encourages Research Project grants (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to study neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms contributing to concurrent alcohol and nicotine use and dependence. This FOA will utilize the Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-098, that encourages applications under the R21 mechanism.

On February 12, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Technology Research and Development (SBIR [R43/R44]) (PA-09-100). On December 19, 2007, President George W. Bush signed into law the "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Act), P.L. 110-140. This Act requires SBIR/STTR agencies, whenever possible and appropriate, to give high priority within the SBIR and STTR programs to energy efficiency or renewable energy system research and development projects (R&D). As part of the implementation of this Act, this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) whose biomedical research is related to energy efficiency or renewable energy systems, to submit SBIR Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track grant applications for R&D projects in those areas. Mechanism of Support. This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, Fast-Track, and Phase II Competing Renewal applications (NIH only), and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-101, that solicits applications under the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) (R41/R42) grant mechanisms.

On February 12, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Technology Research and Development (STTR [R41/R42]) (PA-09-101). On December 19, 2007, President George W. Bush signed into law the "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Act), P.L. 110-140. This Act requires SBIR/STTR agencies, whenever possible and appropriate, to give high priority within the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs to energy efficiency or renewable energy system research and development projects (R&D). As part of the implementation of this Act, this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) whose biomedical research is related to energy efficiency or renewable energy systems, to submit STTR Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track grant applications for R&D projects in those areas. This FOA will utilize the STTR (R41/R42) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-100, which encourages applications under the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms.

On February 13, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Centers for AIDS Research: D-CFAR, CFAR (P30) (PAR-09-103). This FOA solicits applications for the Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) program to provide administrative and shared research support to enhance HIV/AIDS research. Applications are being solicited for both standard CFARs and developmental CFARs (D-CFARs). Standard and D-CFARs provide core facilities, expertise, resources, and services not readily obtained otherwise through more traditional funding mechanisms. Additionally, D-CFARs provide support to assist investigators in the development of a competitive standard CFAR. The program emphasizes interdisciplinary collaboration, especially between basic and clinical investigators, translational research between the laboratory and the clinic and vice versa, inclusion of minority investigators, and inclusion of prevention and behavioral change research. This FOA will utilize the NIH Center Core Grants (P30) assistance mechanism.

On February 25, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with NIMH, NIAAA, and NICHD, issued a PA entitled Developmental Psychopharmacology (R01) (PA-09-111). The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to request research grant applications to examine the neurobiological impact of psychotherapeutic medications upon the immature brain, with particular emphasis upon mapping the precise developmental profile of physiological response to psychotropic agents used in the treatment of mental disorders in children. Relevant research includes studies in model systems, including animals, and in human populations. This FOA will utilize the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-112, which encourages applications under the Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) award mechanism.

On February 25, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with NIMH, NIAAA, and NICHD, issued a PA entitled Developmental Psychopharmacology (R21) (PA-09-112). The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to request research grant applications to examine the neurobiological impact of psychotherapeutic medications upon the immature brain, with particular emphasis upon mapping the precise developmental profile of physiological response to psychotropic agents used in the treatment of mental disorders in children. Relevant research includes studies in model systems, including animals, and in human populations. This FOA will utilize the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) award mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-111, which encourages applications under the Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism.

On February 19, 2009, NIDA in collaboration with NCI jointly issued a PA entitled Testing Tobacco Products Promoted to Reduce Harm (R01) (PA-09-046). This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) invites applications that propose multidisciplinary research on potential reduced-exposure tobacco products, both smoked and smokeless. The multidisciplinary studies can span basic, biological, behavioral, surveillance, and epidemiology research. The tobacco industry is currently promoting several new products with claims that they: a) are less either harmful or less addictive; and b) purportedly deliver lower amounts of toxic, carcinogenic, and/or addictive agents to the user compared with conventional products. However, to date, the scientific evidence is insufficient to evaluate whether these new products actually reduce the users' exposure or risk for tobacco-related diseases. The overarching goal of this FOA is to determine whether potential reduced-exposure tobacco products provide a truly, less-harmful alternative to conventional tobacco products, both at the individual and population level. This FOA uses the NIH research project R01 grant mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-047 that encourages applications under the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) Grant mechanism.

On February 19, 2009, NIDA in collaboration with NCI jointly issued a PA entitled Testing Tobacco Products Promoted to Reduce Harm (R21) (PA-09-047). This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) invites applications that propose multidisciplinary research on potential reduced-exposure tobacco products, both smoked and smokeless. The multidisciplinary studies can span basic, biological, behavioral, surveillance, and epidemiology research. The tobacco industry is currently promoting several new products with claims that they: a) are less either harmful or less addictive; and b) purportedly deliver lower amounts of toxic, carcinogenic, and/or addictive agents to the user compared with conventional products. However, to date, the scientific evidence is insufficient to evaluate whether these new products actually reduce the users' exposure or risk for tobacco-related diseases. The overarching goal of this FOA is to determine whether potential reduced-exposure tobacco products provide a truly, less-harmful alternative to conventional tobacco products, both at the individual and population level This FOA utilizes the NIH exploratory/developmental (R21) grant mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-046, which uses the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) mechanism.

On February 26, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Manufacturing Processes of Medical, Dental, and Biological Technologies (SBIR [R43/R44]) (PA-09-113). On February 26, 2004, Executive Order 13329 was signed by President George W. Bush requiring SBIR/STTR agencies, to the extent permitted by law and in a manner consistent with the mission of the Department, to give high priority within the SBIR and STTR programs to manufacturing-related research and development (R&D). In response to this Executive Order, NIH is expanding its focus by encouraging eligible United States small business concerns to submit SBIR Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track grant applications whose biomedical research is related to advanced processing, manufacturing processes, equipment and systems, and manufacturing workforce skills and protection. This FOA will utilize the SBIR (R43/R44) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-114, which encourages applications under the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) (R41/R42) grant mechanisms.

On February 26, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Manufacturing Processes of Medical, Dental, and Biological Technologies (STTR [R41/R42]) (PA-09-114). On February 26, 2004, Executive Order 13329 was signed by President George W. Bush requiring SBIR/STTR agencies, to the extent permitted by law and in a manner consistent with the mission of the Department, to give high priority within the SBIR and STTR programs to manufacturing-related research and development (R&D). In response to this Executive Order, NIH is expanding its focus by encouraging eligible United States small business concerns to submit STTR Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track grant applications whose biomedical research is related to advanced processing, manufacturing processes, equipment and systems, and manufacturing workforce skills and protection. This FOA will utilize the STTR (R41/R42) grant mechanisms for Phase I, Phase II, and Fast-Track applications and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-113, that encourages applications under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) (R43/R44) grant mechanisms.

On March 3, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with NIAAA and NICHD, issued a PA entitled Medications Development for the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women with Substance Related Disorders and/or In Utero Substance Exposed Neonates (R01) (PA-09-106). The purpose of this FOA is to foster the development of novel pharmacological strategies for the treatment of pregnant/postpartum women with Substance Related Disorders (SRDs) and/or in utero substance exposed neonates. This FOA will encourage applications to implement preclinical and clinical research directed towards: 1) the identification, evaluation, and development of safe and effective novel pharmacotherapies (e.g., new chemical entities or immunotherapies) for the treatment of pregnant/postpartum women with SRDs and/or in utero substance exposed neonates, and/or 2) the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of FDA approved medications (e.g., medications approved for a different indication) for the treatment of pregnant/postpartum women with SRDs and/or in utero substance exposed neonates. This FOA will use the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-107 that encourages applications under the Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism.

On March 3, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with NIAAA and NICHD, issued a PA entitled Medications Development for the Treatment of Pregnant/Postpartum Women with Substance Related Disorders and/or In Utero Substance Exposed Neonates (R21) (PA-09-107). The purpose of this FOA is to foster the development of novel pharmacological strategies for the treatment of pregnant/postpartum women with Substance Related Disorders (SRDs) and/or in utero substance exposed neonates. This FOA will encourage applications to implement preclinical and clinical research directed towards: 1) the identification, evaluation, and development of safe and effective novel pharmacotherapies (e.g., new chemical entities or immunotherapies) for the treatment of pregnant/postpartum women with SRDs and/or in utero substance exposed neonates, and/or 2) the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of FDA approved medications (e.g., medications approved for a different indication) for the treatment of pregnant/postpartum women with SRDs and/or in utero substance exposed neonates. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-106 that encourages applications under the Research Project Grant (R01).

On March 27, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Basic and Translational Research in Emotion (R01) (PA-09-137). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications to expand basic and translational research on the processes and mechanisms involved in the experience, expression, and regulation of emotion. This FOA will utilize the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism. Applications of identical scientific scope are encouraged also under the NIH Small Research Grant (R03) and the NIH Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) award mechanisms, responding to FOAs PA-06-180 and PA-06-181, respectively.

On April 18, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Research on Teen Dating Violence (R01) (PA-09-169). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages investigator-initiated research grant applications from institutions/organizations that propose to conduct behavioral and/or biomedical research aimed at better understanding the etiologies and precursors for, reducing risk for, and incidence of, teen dating violence (TDV). Research is also sought that examines the linkages and gaps among perceptions of appropriate responses to teen dating violence from service providers, the criminal justice system, teens themselves, victims, perpetrators and bystanders. This FOA will utilize the R01 grant mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-170, which encourages applications under the R21 mechanism.

On April 18, 2009, NIDA, in conjunction with a number of other NIH components, issued a PA entitled Research on Teen Dating Violence (R21) (PA-09-170). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages investigator-initiated research grant applications from institutions/ organizations that propose to conduct behavioral and/or biomedical research aimed at better understanding the etiologies and precursors for, reducing risk for, and incidence of, teen dating violence (TDV). Research is also sought that examines the linkages and gaps among perceptions of appropriate responses to teen dating violence from service providers, the criminal justice system, teens themselves, victims, perpetrators and bystanders. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) grant mechanism and runs in parallel with a FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-169, which encourages applications under the R01 mechanism.

On April 24, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with NIMH, NICHD and the AHRQ's Center for Primary Care Prevention and Clinical Partnerships, issued a PA entitled Women's Mental Health in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period (R01) (PA-09-174). In this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), participating agencies encourage research on women's mental health in relation to pregnancy and the postpartum period. As illustrated by a few highly publicized cases, the consequences of severe untreated postpartum depression and psychosis can be devastating for individuals, families, and communities. A recent evidence-based practice report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality noted that depression is also prevalent during pregnancy as well as the postpartum period, therefore research that occurs throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period (the perinatal period) is encouraged. This FOA will utilize the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-175, that encourages applications under the Exploratory/Developmental (R21) award mechanism.

On April 24, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with NIMH, NICHD and the AHRQ's Center for Primary Care Prevention and Clinical Partnerships, issued a PA entitled Women's Mental Health in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period (R21) (PA-09-175). In this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), the participating agencies encourage research on women's mental health in relation to pregnancy and the postpartum period. As illustrated by a few highly publicized cases, the consequences of severe untreated postpartum depression and psychosis can be devastating for individuals, families, and communities. A recent evidence-based practice report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality noted that depression is also prevalent during pregnancy as well as the postpartum period, therefore research that occurs throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period (the perinatal period) is encouraged. This FOA will use the NIH Exploratory/Developmental (R21) award mechanism and runs in parallel with an FOA of identical scientific scope, PA-09-174, that encourages applications under the Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism.

Other Program Activities

Clinical Trials Network (CTN) Update

RFP: The RFP N01DA-9-2217, Data and Statistics Center for the NIDA Clinical Trials Network, was issued on March 23, 2009. Proposals are due May 7, 2009, with a planned award in August 2009.

Protocols: A total of 42 protocols have been initiated since 2001, including multi-site clinical trials (28), multi-site surveys (3), studies in special populations (5), and secondary analyses of data across various trials (6). Twenty-three trials have completed data lock; one is in the follow-up, data-lock phase; three are currently enrolling and four are in development. In addition, 18 ancillary studies have been supported by CTN and non-CTN funds. Seven protocols are in the development phase. Over 10,000 participants have enrolled in studies.

Primary outcome papers are published and dissemination materials have been developed with CSAT's ATTC on the following:

  • Protocol CTN 0001, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Inpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0002, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Outpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0005, MI (Motivational Interviewing) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0006, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Drug Free Clinics
  • Protocol CTN 0007, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Methadone Clinics

Primary outcome papers are published or in press for:

  • Protocol CTN 0003, Bup/Nx: Comparison of Two Taper Schedules
  • Protocol CTN 0004, MET (Motivational Enhancement Treatment) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0008, A Baseline for Investigating Diffusion of Innovation
  • Protocol CTN 0009, Smoking Cessation Treatment with Transdermal Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0010, Buprenorphine/Naloxone-Facilitated Rehabilitation for Heroin Addicted Adolescents/Young Adults
  • Protocol CTN 0011, A Feasibility Study of a Telephone Enhancement Procedure (TELE) to Improve Participation in Continuing Care Activities
  • Protocol CTN 0012, Characteristics of Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C Viral Infection, and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0013, Motivational Enhancement Therapy to Improve Treatment Utilization and Outcome In Pregnant Substance Abusers
  • Protocol CTN 0016, Patient Feedback: A Performance Improvement Study in Outpatient Addiction Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0018, Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Men in Drug Abuse Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0019, Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Women in Drug Abuse Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0021, Motivational Enhancement Treatment to Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome for Spanish-Speaking Individuals Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse. This is the first Spanish-only protocol in the CTN.

In addition, the following protocols have submitted primary papers:

  • Protocol CTN 0015, Women's Treatment for Trauma and Substance Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial
  • Protocol CTN 0017, HIV and HCV Intervention in Drug Treatment Settings
  • Protocol CTN 0029, A Pilot Study of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) in Initiating and Maintaining Abstinence in Smokers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

The following protocols have locked the data:

  • Protocol CTN 0014, Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers (BSFT)
  • Protocol CTN 0028, Randomized Controlled Trial of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders (SUD).

The following protocol has ended new enrollment, and is in the follow-up or data-lock phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0030, Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) is a randomized 2-phase, open-label, multi-center study in outpatient treatment settings. Pre-screening began in May 2006. The study is being carried out in 9 sites, and has randomized 653 participants into phase 1 and 360 participants into phase 2.
  • CTN 0030A1, Collection of Economic Data for the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study. This ancillary study was conducted in collaboration with NIDA DESPR and it is in the data analysis phase.
  • CTN 0030A2, Effects of Chronic Opioids is conducted in collaboration with NIDA DCNBR to obtain anatomical MR scans in subjects with a history of opioid use to evaluate neural changes that may occur with such use and compare with age/gender healthy controls. This study is in the data analysis phase.
  • CTN 0030A3, POATS Long-Term Follow Up Study (LTFU) is being implemented at all POATS sites to examine long-term outcomes for individuals who participated in CTN-0030 with opioid analgesic (OA) dependence.

The following protocols are currently enrolling:

  • Protocol CTN 0027, Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies (START) is a randomized, open-label, multi-center study that was developed in collaboration with the Division of Pharmacotherapies & Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMCDA). Enrollment began in April 2006. As of February 28, 2009, 1,040 participants had been randomized.

    CTN 0027A1, START Pharmacogenetics: Exploratory Genetic Studies In Starting Treatment With Agonist Replacement Therapies.

    CTN-0027A2, Retention of Suboxone Patients in START: Perspectives of Providers and Patients. The overall purposes of the supplemental study are to identify and assess barriers for retaining Suboxone patients.
  • Protocol CTN 0031, Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step (STAGE-12): Evaluation of a Combined Individual-Group Intervention to Reduce Stimulant and Other Drug Use by Increasing 12-Step Involvement. As of February 28, 2009, all ten sites (three Wave 1, seven Wave 2) are actively recruiting and have randomized a total of 210 participants to either the STAGE-12 or the TAU condition.

    CTN 0031A1, An Evaluation of Neurocognitive Function, Oxidative Damage, and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Methamphetamine and Cocaine Abusers. Potential participants are being recruited at six sites.

    CTN 0031A2, The Role of Alcohol Consumption in Classifications of Alcohol Use Disorders: A Clinical Study. It investigates the utility of adding a frequency measure of alcohol consumption (i.e., the first three items of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT-C]), to the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders. This study is funded by an MOU between NIDA and NIAAA. Data will be collected for this study throughout the life of the main STAGE-12 study.

    CTN 0031A3, Organizational and Practitioner Influences on Implementation of STAGE-12. The study assesses the influence of counselor and organizational variables on fidelity of the STAGE-12 intervention during the clinical trial, tests the impact of fidelity on clinical trial participant outcomes, and explores the influence of counselor and organizational variables on sustainability of the STAGE-12 intervention following completion of the clinical trial. Study staff has already collected the organizational and counselor level data from all ten STAGE-12 sites. The baseline data obtained in this research will form the foundation for an R01 grant application.
  • Protocol CTN 0032, HIV Rapid Testing and Counseling in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs in the U.S. This study seeks to evaluate the most effective strategy to ensure that persons in drug treatment programs are tested for HIV and receive their HIV test results. The protocol seeks to enroll more than 1,200 participants across approximately 12 sites in the US. All 12 sites are active in the study: Lexington/Richland Alcohol and Drug Council-LRADAC and Morris Village (Southern Consortium Node); Wheeler Clinic and Midwestern Connecticut Council on Alcoholism-MCCA (New England Node); Daymark Recovery Services, Inc. (Florida Node); CPCDA (Appalachian Tri-State Node); CODA (Oregon/Hawaii Node); La Frontera (California/Arizona Node); Gibson Recovery (Ohio Valley Node); Chesterfield CSB Substance Abuse Services and Glenwood Life Counseling Center (Mid-Atlantic Node); and The Life Link (Southwest Node). As of February 28, 2009, 419 participants were randomized.

    CTN 0032A1, Economic Analysis of HIV Rapid Testing in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs. This is an ancillary study to protocol CTN 0032, to conduct an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of on-site HIV testing in drug abuse treatment settings vs referral for off-site testing. The PI is Dr. Bruce Schakman. The project is in collaboration with NIDA's DESPR.
  • Protocol CTN 0033-Ot, Methamphetamine Use among American Indians. The first area of research emphasis in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Strategic Plan on Reducing Health Disparities (2004 Revision) is the epidemiology of drug abuse, health consequences and infectious diseases among minority populations. The study is a collaboration among four Nodes: Pacific NW, Southwest, Oregon/Hawaii, and Ohio Valley.
  • Protocol CTN 0035-Ot, Access to HIV and Hepatitis Screening and Care among Ethnic Minority Drug Users In and Out of Drug Treatment. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and is being conducted in the California/Arizona Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0036-Ot, Epidemiology and Ethnographic Survey of "Cheese" Heroin Use among Hispanics in Dallas County. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and is being conducted in the Texas Node.

The following protocols are in the development phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0034-Ot, Developing Research Capacity and Culturally Appropriate Research Methods: Community-based Participatory Research Manual for Collaborative Research in Drug Abuse for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the Pacific Northwest Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0037, Exercise as a Treatment for Substance Use Disorders. This clinical trial will test the effectiveness of the addition of exercise in improving drug abuse treatment outcomes.
  • Protocol CTN-0038-Ot, Barriers to Substance Abuse Treatment among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. The objective of this study is to gain a better understanding of the factors that may influence the under-utilization of substance abuse treatment services by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and the readiness of substance abuse treatment programs serving AAPIs to participate in clinical trials and adopt evidence based practices (collaboration with NIH NCMHD).
  • Protocol CTN 0044, Web-delivery of Evidence-Based, Psychosocial Treatment for Substance Use Disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of adding an interactive, web-based version of the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) intervention plus abstinence incentives as an adjunct to community-based, outpatient substance abuse treatment.
  • Protocol CTN 0045-Ot, Rates of HIV Testing and Barriers to Testing in African Americans Receiving Substance Abuse Treatment. This is an observational study seeking to: (1) Compare the proportion of African American and non-African Americans receiving treatment at substance abuse treatment clinics that have been tested for HIV within the past 12 months; (2) Observe relationships between rates of African Americans who have not been tested and a) the types of testing offered at substance abuse treatment clinics and b) the types of outreach strategies used to engage persons in HIV testing; and (3) assess African American clients' self-reported barriers to accessing HIV testing, in relation to other ethnicities.
  • Protocol CTN-0046, Smoking-Cessation and Stimulant Treatment (S-CAST): Evaluation of the Impact of Concurrent Outpatient Smoking-Cessation and Stimulant Treatment on Stimulant-Dependence Outcomes. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of substance abuse treatment as usual plus smoking cessation treatment (TAU+SCT), relative to substance abuse treatment as usual (TAU), on drug abuse outcomes.
  • Protocol CTN-0047, Screening, Motivational Assessment, Referral and Treatment in Emergency Departments (SMART-ED). The study objective is to evaluate the implementation of and outcomes associated with a screening and brief intervention (SBI) process to identify individuals with substance use, abuse, or dependence seen in emergency departments (EDs) and to provide interventions and/or referral to treatment consistent with the severity of their substance use disorder.

In addition to the primary CTN trials, there are currently five secondary analyses using data across several of the completed trials:

  1. Gender Differences in the Prevalence and Predictors of HIV Risk Behaviors, PI: Audrey Brooks (CA/AZ Node);
  2. Pattern of alcohol use and alcohol-related diagnoses among drug abusing/dependent participants, PIs: Dennis Donovan and Bryan Hartzler (Pacific Northwest Node);
  3. The relationships between demographic characteristics of patients and therapists, measures of therapeutic process and therapeutic alliance, and outcomes, PIs: Alyssa Forcehimes (Southwest Node) and Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node);
  4. The Efficacy of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for African Americans, PI: Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node);
  5. Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes in Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations, PI: Carmen Masson (California-Arizona Node).

There are also about 40 funded studies supported by independent grants that use CTN studies as a platform.




NIDA's New and Competing Continuation Grants Awarded Since September 2008

Ahijevych, Karen L. -- Ohio State University
Bitter Taste Phenotype as a Risk Factor of Oral Nicotine Replacement Nonadherence

Andrews, Judy A. -- Oregon Research Institute
Childhood and Adolescent Predictors of Substance Abuse in Emerging Adulthood

Aston-Jones, Gary S. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Gene Transfer into Selected Brain Neurons in Vivo

Barres, Ben A. -- Stanford University
The Role of Glia in the Formation of Functional Synapses

Beauvais, Frederick -- Colorado State University - Fort Collins
Drug Use among Young Indians: Epidemiology and Prediction

Belenko, Steven R. -- Temple University
The Pennsylvania Research Center at Temple University

Berns, Gregory S. -- Emory University
Neurobiology of Uncertainty

Berrettini, Wade H. -- University of Pennsylvania
Genetics of Nicotine Dependence

Bhagwagar, Zubin -- Yale University
A PET Study of 5-HT1B Receptor Binding as a Novel Biomarker for Cocaine Dependency

Bierut, Laura J. -- Washington University
Genetics Study of Nicotine Dependence in African Americans

Blough, Bruce E. -- Research Triangle Institute
Development of Potential Treatment Medications for Drug Abuse

Boyd, Carol J. -- University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
A Prospective Study of the Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications by Adolescents

Bradesi, Sylvie S. -- Brentwood Biomedical Research Institute
Spinal Glia Activation in Chronic Stress-Induced Visceral Hyperalgesia

Bruce, Jacqueline -- Oregon Social Learning Center, Inc.
Risk for Substance Use in Foster Adolescents: An fMRI Study of Inhibitory Control

Case, Patricia -- Fenway Community Health Center
Feasibility of Pharmacy-Based HIV Interventions among IDUs: Two New England Cities

Chang, Sulie L. -- Seton Hall University
Mechanisms of Nicotine's Behavioral Effects on the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat

Chen, Kevin -- University of Maryland, Baltimore
Treatment of Cocaine Addiction with Integrative Meditation

Cinciripini, Paul M. -- University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Effectiveness of Varenicline vs. Varenicline plus Bupropion for Smoking Cessation

Coffman, Donna L. -- Pennsylvania State University, University Park
Causal Inference for Mediation Models in Substance Abuse Prevention Research

Cooper, Hannah L. -- Emory University
Public Housing Relocations: Impact on Healthcare Access, Drug Use and Sexual Health

Cubbins, Lisa A. -- Battelle Centers/Public Health Research and Evaluation
Immigration Effects on Substance Abuse, Mental Health and Treatment Gaps

Cunningham, Rebecca M. -- University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Substance Use among Violently Injured Youth in an Urban ER: Services and Outcome

Dafny, Nachum -- University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
How and Where Methylphenidate Exerts Effect in Adolescent and Adult Brains

David, Sean P. -- Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island
Exploratory/Developmental Study of Pharmacogenetic Smoking Cessation Therapy

Deutsch, Dale G. -- State University New York, Stony Brook
Endocannabinoid Inactivation: Plasma Membrane Uptake and Cellular Trafficking

Drobes, David J. -- H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Influence of Smoking Abstinence and Age on ERP Indices of Attentional Control

D'souza, Deepak C. -- Yale University
Imaging Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Schizophrenia

Dunlap, Laura J. -- Research Triangle Institute
Evaluation of a Web-Based Instrument for Service-Level Cost Estimation in Drug Abuse

El-Hage, Nazira -- Virginia Commonwealth University
Oxidative Damage and Proteasome Activity: Role of Opioid in HIV-HCV Infection

Evans, David E. -- H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Automatic Attention to Smoking Cues: Neural Correlates

Franklin, Teresa R. -- University of Pennsylvania
Dopaminergic Variants Involved in Smoking Behavior: A Perfusion fMRI Study

Friedmann, Peter D. -- Rhode Island Hospital (Providence, RI)
Continuum of Care for Drug-Involved Offenders

Garofalo, Robert -- Children's Memorial Hospital (Chicago)
Syndemic Development and HIV Risk among Vulnerable Young Men

Glass, Michael J. -- Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Glutamate Receptors and Opioid Dependence: Molecules, Circuits and Behavior

Hao, Shuanglin -- University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Pathogenesis and Therapy of HIV-Related Neuropathic Pain

Heinzerling, Keith G. -- University of California, Los Angeles
Pilot Trial of Bupropion vs. Placebo for Methamphetamine Abuse in Adolescents

Higgins, Stephen T. -- University of Vermont and State Agriculture College
Modeling Initial Smoking Abstinence and Relapse Risk

Hooten, W. Michael -- Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester
Cognitive Behavioral Smoking Cessation Intervention for Adults with Chronic Pain

Horner, Kristen A. -- Mercer University, Macon
The Role of Mu Opioid Receptor Activation in Psychostimulant-Induced Gene Express

Hruby, Victor J. -- University of Arizona
New Modalities for Treatment of Pain and Drug Abuse

Hu, Xiu-Ti -- Rush University Medical Center
Chronic Cocaine Exposure and HIV-1 Tat: Dysregulation of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

Hurd, Yasmin L. -- Mount Sinai School of Medicine of NYU
The Opioid Mesolimbic System in Heroin Abuse

Hussong, Andrea M. -- University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Internalizing Pathways to Drug Use: A Multi-Sample Analysis

Iacono, William G. -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Twin Family Study of Vulnerability to Substance Abuse

Isgor, Ceylan -- Florida Atlantic University
Individual Differences in Relapse to Nicotine

Ivanov, Iliyan Stoyanov -- Mount Sinai School of Medicine of NYU
Activation of Neuronal Networks Related to Risk for Addiction: A fMRI Study

Johnson, Knowlton -- West Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation
A Community Trial in Alaska to Prevent Youth's Use of Legal Products to Get High

Johnson, Matthew Wayne -- Johns Hopkins University
Development of a Novel Trial-By-Trial Consequence Human Delay Discounting Task

Kelley, Michelle L. -- Old Dominion University
Secondary Effects of Parent Treatment for Drug Abuse on Children

Kerr, Thomas -- University of British Columbia
Evaluating the Natural History of Injection Drug Use

Khan, Maria -- National Development and Research Institutes
Longitudinal Study of Substance Use, Incarceration, and STI in the U.S.

Kombe, Gilbert -- ABT Associates, Inc.
Feasibility of Pharmacy-Based HIV Interventions among IDUs: Ha Giang, Vietnam

Kumar, Anil -- University of Missouri, Kansas City
HIV, Drug Abuse and Neurotoxicity

Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V. -- University of Medicine/Dental of NJ, NJ Medical School
Regulation of D1 Dopamine Receptor Expression by ncRNA in Cocaine Addiction

Latimer, William W. -- Johns Hopkins University
Randomized Trial of IFCBT-HIVPI to Prevent HIV among Non-Injection Drug Users

Leve, Leslie Diane -- Oregon Social Learning Center, Inc.
Juvenile Justice Girls: Pathways to Adjustment and System Use in Young Adulthood

Licata, Stephanie C. -- McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA)
Neurochemical Substrates of Sedative/Hypnotic Action: Proton MRS Studies

Ling, Walter -- University of California, Los Angeles
Sustained-Release Methylphenidate for Management of Methamphetamine Use Disorders

Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan -- Temple University
Cellular Pharmacology of Kappa Opiod Receptor

Lukas, Scott E. -- McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA)
Citicoline-Induced Modulation of Cannabis Effects: Imaging and Mechanism of Action

Mackenzie, Robert George -- Wayne State University
Inducible Regulation of Key Transcription Factors in Dopamine Neurons

Mahadevan, Anu -- Organix, Inc.
Development of CB2 Agonists for Treatment of Pain

Marks, Michael J. -- University of Colorado at Boulder
Genetics of Nicotine Tolerance: Role of Receptors

Mawhinney-Delson, Samantha M. -- University of Colorado, Denver
Consequences of Drug Use and Informative Dropout on HIV/AIDS Outcomes in the MACS

McCaffrey, Daniel F. -- Rand Corporation
The Causal Effect of Community-Based Treatment for Youths

McCaul, Mary E. -- Johns Hopkins University
Gender Effects on Amphetamine-Induced Dopamine Release and Subjective Responses

McClernon, Francis Joseph -- Duke University
Neuropharmacology of Response Inhibition in Comorbid ADHD and Nicotine Dependence

McMahon, Lance R. -- University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
Nicotine Dependence: Neuropharmacology in Monkeys

Mehler, Ernest L. -- Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Functional Properties of Protein Segments in Receptors and Transporters

Merchant, Roland C. -- Rhode Island Hospital (Providence, RI)
Brief Intervention for Drug Misuse for the Emergency Department (BIDMED)

Montague, P. Read -- Baylor College of Medicine
Computational Substrates of Addiction and Reward

Moore, Richard D. -- Johns Hopkins University
HIV Disease Outcomes in Drug Users in Clinical Practice

Mutchler, Matt -- California State University, Dominguez Hills
Sex-Drugs and HIV: How Substances Became Associated with Sex among AA

Narendran, Rajesh -- University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
Imaging Dopamine D2 Agonist Binding Sites in Cocaine Dependence with [11C] NPA

Nemoto, Tooru -- Public Health Institute
Substance Use and HIV Risk among Thai Women

Noel, Richard J. -- Ponce School of Medicine
Synergistic Neurotoxicity of Speedball and HIV Toxins

Nyamathi, Adeline M. -- University of California, Los Angeles
HBV Prevention for Homeless at Risk for HBV/HCV/HIV

Oncken, Cheryl -- University of Connecticut School of Medicine/Dental
Exercise in Smoking Cessation in Postmenopausal Women

Pan, Zhizhong Z. -- University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Impact of Pain on Sensitivity to Opioid Reward

Patten, Christi A. -- Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester
Tobacco Cessation Treatment for Alaska Native Youth

Persidsky, Yuri -- Temple University
Mechanisms and Interventions for Methamphetamine and HIV-1 Induced CNS Injury

Peterson, Eric C. -- University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock
Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates for the Treatment of Methamphetamine Abuse

Pickel, Virginia M. -- Weill Medical College of Cornell University
EM-Transmitter Interactions of Striatal Opioid Neurons

Prendergast, Michael L. -- University of California, Los Angeles
Pacific Coast Research Center of CJ-DATS 2

Rademacher, David J. -- Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
The Role of Activity-Regulated Cytoskeletal-Associated Protein in Amphetamine

Reggio, Patricia H. -- University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Molecular Determinants of Cannabinoid Activity

Richardson, Gale A. -- University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Use: 21-Year Follow-Up

Rosenman, Robert Edward -- Washington State University
Development of Econometric Models for Improved Estimation of Prevention Program

Rowlett, James K. -- Harvard University (Medical School)
Anxiolytic Effects and Abuse of BZ Receptor Ligands

Roy, Sabita -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Opioid Abuse, Opportunistic Infection and NeuroAIDS

Ruiz-Velasco, Victor J. -- Pennsylvania State University, Hershey Medical Center
Coupling Mechanisms of NOP Receptors and Calcium Channels

Sacks, Stanley -- National Development and Research Institutes
NDRI Rocky Mountain Research Center for CJ-DATS 2

Salo, Ruth E. -- University of California, Davis
Neural and Cognitive Correlates of Methamphetamine Use in Schizophrenia

Schwartz, Seth J. -- University of Miami School of Medicine
The Role of Culture in Thriving and Risk Behavior in Hispanic Adolescents

Selley, Dana E. -- Virginia Commonwealth University
CB1 Receptor Regulation by Cannabinoid Receptor Interacting Protein Crip1a

Setlow, Barry -- Texas A&M University System
Neural Mechanism of Enduring Cocaine Effects on Impulsive Choice

Slesnick, Natasha -- Ohio State University
Stage 1 Treatment Development with Homeless Mothers and Their 2-6 Year Old Children

Spigelman, Igor -- University of California, Los Angeles
Development of Peripherally-Acting Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Ligands

Stein, Michael D. -- Butler Hospital (Providence, RI)
Linkage of Hospitalized Opioid Users to Buprenorphine

Sterk, Claire E. -- Emory University
Neighborhood Effects on Drug Use among African American Adults

Tracy, Elizabeth M. -- Case Western Reserve University
Role of Personal Social Networks in Post Treatment Functioning

Vandrey, Ryan G. -- Johns Hopkins University
Efficacy and Safety of Dronabinol (Oral THC) for Treating Cannabis Dependence

Visher, Christy A. -- University of Delaware
Implementing Effective HIV/Drug Treatment in Corrections-Midstates CJ-DATS Center

Vulchanova, Lyudmila H. -- University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
The Neurosecretory Protein VGF Contributions to Pain

Wakschlag, Lauren S. -- University of Illinois at Chicago
Prenatal Smoking and the Substrates of Disruptive Behavior in Early Life

Wang, Gene-Jack -- Brookhaven Science Associates, Brookhaven Laboratories
Studies in Cocaine Abuse

Winder, Danny G. -- Vanderbilt University
Physiology of Periaqueductal Gray Dopamine Neurons

Xu, Ming -- University of Chicago
Extinction of Cue-Elicited Cocaine Seeking

Zheng, Guangrong -- University of Kentucky
Development of Antagonists for M5 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

Zhu, Jun -- University of South Carolina at Columbia
Role of Dopamine Transporter: HIV-1 Tat Protein and Nicotine Sensitization

Zucker, Robert A. -- University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Brain Endophenotypes Modulating Drug Abuse Risk

Zule, William A. -- Research Triangle Institute
The Role of Dead Space Syringes in HIV Epidemics Amount IDU's - Drug Abuse Aspect


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