Skip Navigation

Link to  the National Institutes of Health  
The Science of Drug Abuse and Addiction from the National Institute on Drug Abuse Archives of the National Institute on Drug Abuse web site
Go to the Home page
   

NIDA Home > Publications > Director's Reports > February, 2009 Index    

Director's Report to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse - February, 2009



Program Activities

New NIDA PAs and RFAs

On August 27, 2008, NIDA reissued an RFA entitled Medications Development Centers of Excellence (P50). This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages grant applications for Medications Development Centers of Excellence (MDCEs) that conduct drug abuse and addiction research, and that have outstanding innovative science and are multidisciplinary, thematically integrated, synergistic, and are/will be serving as national resources for the NIDA research fields. The MDCEs should be dedicated to clinical research directed towards the identification, evaluation, and development of safe and effective medications for treatment of substance related disorders, alone or with comorbid conditions.

In 2008, NIDA issued a new SBIR Contract Proposal entitled Development of Therapeutic Agents for Substance Use Disorders (105). The purpose of this FOA is to support pilot clinical studies of medications for investigation as possible treatments for Substance Related Disorders (SRDs). The neurophysiological underpinnings of substance abuse appear to involve numerous neurotransmitter systems including opioid, dopamine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate across multiple brain regions. Small businesses have used government grant programs to conduct basic research and early preclinical testing; however, many of these projects are still in an early drug development stage and are not yet candidates for capital funding. Thus, the short-term goal of this SBIR contract is to create a mechanism of 'bridge funding' whereby novel therapeutic agents or immunotherapies that have demonstrated promising pre-clinical findings can be further evaluated in clinical trials. It is anticipated that these funds, long term, will help shepherd promising products from 'bench to bedside'.

On October 2, 2008, NIDA issued a Program Announcement entitled Drug Abuse Epidemiology and Services Research in Cooperation with the Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium (R01) PAS-09-001. Through this program announcement with set aside (PAS), NIDA invites applicants to develop innovative drug abuse epidemiology or health services research in cooperation with academic centers supported through the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) consortium. A major NIH initiative, the CTSA consortium is transforming how clinical and translational research is conducted, building an infrastructure for multidisciplinary researchers and clinicians to perform research and develop new treatments more efficiently. As a part of this infrastructure, CTSA sites have established partnerships with a range of clinical settings and have access to large, multi-generational population cohorts. These features of the CTSA sites offer a unique opportunity for researchers to integrate drug abuse epidemiology and health services research in these settings. Applicants are asked to propose innovative drug abuse research which builds upon the resources available at CTSA sites, resources which would include CTSA efforts to strengthen networks of clinical sites and to establish innovative information technologies, phenotyping systems, and biobanks. A broad range of drug abuse epidemiology and health services research areas will be supported under the auspices of this FOA.

On October 21, 2008, NIDA issued a Program Announcement entitled Diversity-promoting Institutions Drug Abuse Research Program (DIDARP) (R24) PAR-09-011. This FOA encourages Research Project Grant (R24) applications from institutions that historically and/or currently serve students from diverse and disadvantaged backgrounds that aim to increase their capacity to conduct drug abuse and addiction research. The applications should propose to foster the research career development of a diverse cadre of faculty, students and staff who are currently underrepresented in drug abuse research, and to enhance research infrastructure at the institution.

On October 29, 2008, NIDA issued a Program Announcement entitled International Research Collaboration on Drug Abuse and Addiction Research (R01) PA-09-020. This Program Announcement (PA) solicits collaborative research proposals on drug abuse and addiction that take advantage of special opportunities that exist outside the United States. Special opportunities include access to unusual talent, resources, populations, or environmental conditions in other countries that will speed scientific discovery. Projects must have relevance to the mission of NIDA and where feasible should address NIDA's scientific priority areas. While the priorities will change from year to year, in FY09 priority areas include: linkages between HIV/AIDS and drug abuse, methamphetamine abuse, inhalant abuse, smoking during pregnancy, and drugs and driving.

On October 29, 2008, NIDA issued a Program Announcement entitled International Research Collaboration on Drug Abuse and Addiction Research (R21) PA-09-021. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits collaborative research proposals on drug abuse and addiction that take advantage of special opportunities that exist outside the United States. Special opportunities include access to unusual talent, resources, populations, or environmental conditions in other countries that will speed scientific discovery. Projects must have relevance to the mission of NIDA and where feasible should address NIDA's scientific priority areas. While the priorities will change from year to year, in FY09 priority areas include: linkages between HIV/AIDS and drug abuse, methamphetamine abuse, inhalant abuse, smoking during pregnancy, and drugs and driving.

On October 29, 2008, NIDA issued a Program Announcement entitled International Research Collaboration on Drug Abuse and Addiction Research (R03) PA-09-022. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicits collaborative research proposals on drug abuse and addiction that take advantage of special opportunities that exist outside the United States. Special opportunities include access to unusual talent, resources, populations, or environmental conditions in other countries that will speed scientific discovery. Projects must have relevance to the mission of NIDA and where feasible should address NIDA's scientific priority areas. While the priorities will change from year to year, in FY09 priority areas include: linkages between HIV/AIDS and drug abuse, methamphetamine abuse, inhalant abuse, smoking during pregnancy, and drugs and driving.

On December 12, 2008, NIDA issued a Program Announcement entitled Pre-Application for the 2009 NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS Research (X02) PAR-09-044. The NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS Research is meant to complement NIDA's traditional investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose high-impact research that will open new avenues for prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS among drug abusers. The term "avant-garde" is used to describe highly innovative approaches that have the potential to be transformative-- open new areas of research or lead to new avenues of treatment and prevention for HIV/AIDS among drug abusers. The proposed research should reflect ideas substantially different from those already being pursued by the investigator or others. The research proposed must be in an area described in the Trans - NIH Plan for HIV-Related Research http://www.oar.nih.gov/ strategicplan/fy2009/index.asp. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for the Avant-Garde Award. The X02 application will be reviewed by external reviewers to identify the most outstanding applications (applications from individuals of exceptional creativity who propose highly significant and innovative projects that are not appropriate for traditional grant mechanisms). Those investigators whose submissions are judged to be the most outstanding will be notified of the opportunity to submit full applications under RFA-DA-09-011. All awards will be made under RFA-DA-09-011. No awards will be made under this announcement.

On December 10, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled 2009 NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS Research (DP1) RFA-DA-09-011. The NIDA Avant-Garde Award Program for HIV/AIDS Research is meant to complement NIDA's traditional investigator-initiated grant programs by supporting individual scientists of exceptional creativity who propose high-impact research that will open new avenues for prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS among drug abusers. The term "avant-garde" is used to describe highly innovative approaches that have the potential to be transformative-- open new areas of research or lead to new avenues of treatment and prevention for HIV/AIDS among drug abusers. The proposed research should reflect ideas substantially different from those already being pursued by the investigator or others. The research proposed must be in an area described in the Trans - NIH Plan for HIV-Related Research (http://www.oar.nih.gov/strategicplan/fy2009/). The 2009 Avant-Garde Award competition will proceed in two phases. The first phase is a pre-application phase in response to PAR-09-044. Pre-applications will be evaluated by a group of external reviewers. Those investigators whose submissions are judged to be the most outstanding will be notified of the opportunity to submit full applications under this FOA (DP1). The 2009 Avant-Garde awardees will be selected from this group of applicants. Application Due Date for this RFA: June 2, 2009.

On January 7, 2009, NIDA issued a Program Announcement entitled Imaging - Science Track Award for Research Transition (I/START) [R03] PAR-09-073. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages Small Research Grant (R03) applications to facilitate the entry of investigators to the area of neuroimaging, including both new investigators and established investigators seeking to adopt neuroimaging methodologies in their research programs. The R03 is intended to support small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources.

On September 12, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled The Interaction of HIV, Drug Use, and the Criminal Justice System (R01) RFA-DA-09-007. This initiative solicits R01 applications that link drug abuse, HIV/AIDS prevention and the criminal justice system. Applications responsive to this FOA should conduct intervention research or propose descriptive research that can clearly lead to effective new interventions. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: October 27, 2008; Application Due Date: November 25, 2008.

On September 12, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Exploratory Centers for Translational Research on the Clinical Neurobiology of Drug Addiction (P20) RFA-DA-09-012. This solicitation invites applications for the development of Exploratory Translational Research Centers on the clinical neurobiology of drug abuse and addiction. For purposes of this FOA, an Exploratory Translational Research Center is defined as an entity with a strong primary human neurobiology focus in which preclinical research is included to directly inform or provide a mechanistic foundation for the human neuroscience/neurobiological research. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: January 27, 2009; Application Receipt Date: February 27, 2009.

On October 1, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Behavioral Pharmacology and Genetics: Translating and Targeting Individual Differences (R03) RFA-DA-09-016. Individual differences in response to drugs of abuse may confer vulnerability or resistance to drug abuse or the development of addiction. Several lines of evidence indicate that genetic variation contributes to drug abuse and addiction as well as to the propensity to use specific classes of drugs, such as psychostimulants, opiates, marijuana and nicotine. Recently developed genetic methodologies make it possible to better understand drug abuse phenotypes in terms of underlying genetic factors. This FOA seeks applications that use controlled, human laboratory-based experimental techniques for the measurement of behavior, combined with genetic analyses, to study drug abuse phenotypes and/or endophenotypes, and their relationship to (a) individual differences in response to drugs of abuse; (b) individual differences in the consequences of repeated abuse; or (c) pharmacogenetic differences in response to putative or currently used pharmacotherapeutic agents for treating addiction. Research in these areas may identify genetic variations that will help define the biochemical mechanisms underlying drug effects and the associated biological and/or behavioral processes responsible for individual differences, and may suggest genetically targeted pharmacotherapeutic approaches for treating addiction. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 27, 2009.

On October 1, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Biosignatures of Chronic Drug Exposure (R21) RFA-DA-09-022. The goal of this funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to discover peripheral biosignatures of drug exposure. In relation to this FOA, biosignatures are defined as biological indicators obtainable through assays, which can be used to ascertain facts about an individual's past exposure to drugs of abuse. Biosignature could be comprised of more than one biomarker. The total number of biomarkers must be reasonably limited to address the developability of the screening assay. This FOA would support high risk projects to search for peripheral, not associated with the central nervous system, biosignatures (not drug or drug metabolites) that could serve as surrogates to monitor changes that are taking place in the brain in response to illicit and licit drug exposure, withdrawal or relapse. These projects are intended to be feasibility projects using animal models only to identify appropriate clinically accessible biomaterial (e.g., blood, lymphocytes, bladder epithelial cells, stem cells) and to identify the best class or classes of molecules (proteins, peptides, RNA, miRNA, etc.) suitable for assay development . These feasibility projects are intended to address technical issues such as sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio, in addition to predictive validity. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 27, 2009.

On October 16, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Interactions between Physical Activity and Drug Abuse (R01) RFA-DA-09-013. The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to stimulate investigations, using animal models or human subjects, of neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms that underlie the effects of physical activity on brain function across the lifespan as well as research designed to improve the translation of existing knowledge of the effects of exercise and physical activity into strategies for the prevention and treatment of drug abuse. The proposed line of investigation may focus on any neurobiological, behavioral or cognitive process that has been demonstrated to be affected by drugs of abuse or behaviors related to drug abuse. The research may be conducted in healthy individuals or, if scientifically appropriate, may include substance-abusing populations. All applications, however, must address how the proposed investigations are relevant to the understanding and/or treatment of substance abuse or how they may be implemented in substance abusing populations. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 28, 2009.

On October 17, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Interactions between Physical Activity and Drug Abuse (R03) RFA-DA-09-014. The goal of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to stimulate investigations (using animal models or human subjects) of neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms that underlie the effects of physical activity on brain function across the lifespan as well as research designed to improve the translation of existing knowledge of the effects of exercise and physical activity into strategies for the prevention and treatment of drug abuse. The proposed line of investigation may focus on any neurobiological, behavioral or cognitive process that has been demonstrated to be affected by drugs of abuse or behaviors related to drug abuse. The research may be conducted in healthy individuals or, if scientifically appropriate, may include substance-abusing populations. All applications, however, must address how the proposed investigations are relevant to the understanding and/or treatment of substance abuse or how they may be implemented in substance abusing populations. Letters of Intent Receipt Date: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 28, 2009.

On November 5, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Brain Imaging Studies of Negative Reinforcement in Humans (R01) RFA-DA-09-008. This FOA solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate brain processes in humans underlying how aversive events control behavior in order to stimulate a program of clinical neuroscience research on negative reinforcement/avoidance learning. On the basis of pre-clinical studies, negative reinforcement has re-emerged as a contributing factor in the basic processes of substance abuse. The range of processes engaged by the human brain to avoid aversive outcomes are much less well understood than that of brain processes engaged by positive outcomes. For the purpose of this FOA negative reinforcement and avoidance learning are considered synonymous and refer to behaviors and cognitive strategies that are learned and maintained in order to minimize or eliminate the occurrence of aversive events. Aversive events may be either environmental stimuli or internal states. Applications for this FOA are expected to propose hypotheses-testing studies regarding the brain regions or processes in humans that underlie avoidance learning including behaviors and cognitive strategies maintained by negative reinforcement. The studies proposed in response to this FOA may be conducted in healthy individuals, substance-abusing populations (current or abstinent) or individuals at risk for substance abuse. However, all applications must address how the proposed investigations are relevant to advancing the understanding of substance abuse. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: January 19, 2009; Application Due Date: February 19, 2009.

On November 5, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Brain Imaging Studies of Negative Reinforcement in Humans (R21) RFA-DA-09-009. This FOA issued by National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, solicits Exploratory/Developmental Grant (R21) applications from institutions/ organizations that propose to investigate brain processes in humans underlying how aversive events control behavior in order to stimulate a program of clinical neuroscience research on negative reinforcement / avoidance learning. On the basis of pre-clinical studies, negative reinforcement has re-emerged as a contributing factor in the basic processes of substance abuse. The range of processes engaged by the human brain to avoid aversive outcomes are much less well understood than that of brain processes engaged by positive outcomes. For the purpose of this FOA negative reinforcement and avoidance learning are considered synonymous and refer to behaviors and cognitive strategies that are learned and maintained in order to minimize or eliminate the occurrence of aversive events. Aversive events may be either environmental stimuli or internal states. Applications for this FOA are expected to propose exploratory, hypotheses-generating or proof of concept studies regarding the brain regions or processes in humans that underlie avoidance learning including behaviors and cognitive strategies maintained by negative reinforcement. This FOA is also appropriate for the development of new tasks in humans that may be used in future brain imaging studies to target specific brain processing areas affected by negative reinforcement/avoidance learning. The studies proposed in response to this FOA may be conducted in healthy individuals, substance-abusing populations (current or abstinent) or individuals at risk for substance abuse. However, all applications must address how the proposed investigations are relevant to advancing the understanding of substance abuse. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: January 19, 2009; Application Due Date: February 19, 2009.

On November 5, 2008, NIDA issued an RFA entitled Secondary Data Analyses for Substance Abuse Research (R21/R33) RFA-DA-09-020. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA), invites Phased Innovation (R21/R33) grant applications from organizations/institutions that propose to conduct secondary analyses of rich biological data sets related to substance abuse research and to advance data and computational infrastructure relevant to the proposed analyses. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 28, 2009.

PAs and RFAs Issued with Other NIH Components/Agencies

On October 6, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with a number of other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled Short Courses on Mathematical, Statistical, and Computational Tools for Studying Biological Systems (R25) PA-09-002. This FOA encourages applications for Research Education Grants (R25) from institutions and organizations to conduct workshops and short courses to improve integration of mathematical, statistical, and computational approaches into biological and/or behavioral research. Support will be limited to activities that reach a wide audience of researchers. The program announcement is NOT intended for university course or curriculum development.

On December 12, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) PA-09-036. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. The primary purpose of the Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) program is to increase and maintain a strong cohort of new and talented NIH-supported independent investigators. The program is designed to facilitate a timely transition from a mentored postdoctoral research position to a stable independent research position with independent NIH or other independent research support at an earlier stage than is currently the norm.

On December 11, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24) PA-09-037. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. The purpose of the NIH Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24) is to provide support to mid-career health-professional doctorates or equivalent who are typically at the Associate Professor level or the equivalent for protected time to devote to patient-oriented research (POR) and to act as research mentors primarily for clinical residents, clinical fellows and/or junior clinical faculty.

On December 11, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled Independent Scientist Award (K02) PA-09-038. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. The purpose of the NIH Independent Scientist Award (K02) is to foster the development of outstanding scientists and enable them to expand their potential to make significant contributions to their field of research. The K02 award provides three, four, or five years of salary support and "protected time" for newly independent (see IC provisions) scientists who can demonstrate the need for a period of intensive research focus as a means of enhancing their research careers. Each independent scientist career award program must be tailored to meet the individual needs of the candidate.

On December 11, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled Mentored Quantitative Research Development Award (K25) PA-09-039. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. The purpose of the Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award (K25) is to attract to NIH-relevant research those investigators whose quantitative science and engineering research has thus far not been focused primarily on questions of health and disease. The K25 award will provide support and "protected time" for a period of supervised study and research for productive professionals with quantitative (e.g., mathematics, statistics, economics, computer science, imaging science, informatics, physics, chemistry) and engineering backgrounds to integrate their expertise with NIH-relevant research.

On December 11, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (K01) PA-09-040. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. The purpose of the NIH Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (K01) is to provide support and "protected time" (three, four, or five years) for an intensive, supervised career development experience in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences leading to research independence. Although all of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) use this mechanism to support career development experiences that lead to research independence, some ICs use the K01 award for individuals who propose to train in a new field or for individuals who have had a hiatus in their research career because of illness or pressing family circumstances. Other ICs utilize the K01 award to increase research workforce diversity by providing enhanced research career development opportunities.

On December 11, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award (K08) PA-09-042. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. The primary purpose of the NIH Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Awards (K08) program is to prepare qualified individuals for careers that have a significant impact on the health-related research needs of the Nation. This program represents the continuation of a long-standing NIH program that provides support and "protected time" to individuals with a clinical doctoral degree for an intensive, supervised research career development experience in the fields of biomedical and behavioral research, including translational research.

On December 11, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23) PA-09-043. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs are to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. The purpose of the NIH Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23) is to support the career development of investigators who have made a commitment to focus their research endeavors on patient-oriented research.

On September 30, 2008 NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued an RFA entitled Replication and Fine-Mapping Studies for the Genes Environment and Health Initiative (GEI) (R01) RFA-CA-09-003. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA), administered by the National Cancer Institute, is a part of the Genes, Environment, and Health Initiative (GEI, http://www.gei.nih.gov/) sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this FOA is to provide support for replication and fine-mapping studies of genetic regions that are putatively associated with common complex traits, primarily those identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The proposed projects should aim to enhance the identification of causal variants influencing complex diseases. Any phenotype may be appropriate for these projects (i.e., studies need not be oriented on cancer or cancer-related phenotypes). This FOA will not support recruitment of human subjects, collection of human specimens, collection of medical or phenotype data, studies using animal models, or discovery genome-wide association efforts. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: October 24, 2008; Application Due Date: December 1, 2008.

On October 9, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with NIDDK and NIBIB, issued an RFA entitled Neuroimaging in Obesity Research (R01) RFA-DK-08-009. This FOA solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/ organizations that propose to use neuroimaging approaches in obesity research in human subjects and animal models. Many areas of the brain interact or communicate with other organs to control eating behavior, physical activity and energy metabolism, and functional neuroimaging holds enormous promise for expanding our understanding of how food intake and energy expenditure are mismatched in a setting of abundantly available nutrients, leading to excessive fat storage. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: February 18, 2009; Application Due Date: March 18, 2009.

On October 20, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with NIAAA, issued an RFA entitled The Mouse Gene Development Initiative (R01) RFA-DA-09-015. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA), requests research grant applications that propose to 1) map traits associated with addiction by varying environmental factors at different states of development across inbred strains of mice including using, but not limited to, selective breeding strategies, recombinant inbred mice, the collaborative cross, and haplotype associative mapping with inbred strains; or 2) Identify epigenetic and genetic modifiers that under different environmental and developmental conditions produces different phenotypic outcomes in mice carrying a defined genetic variant, (e.g., knockout, CNVs). A separate paragraph in the section on Specific Requirements, Objectives, and Scope addresses the interest of NIAAA. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 27, 2009.

On October 24, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with NINDS, issued an RFA entitled Central Nervous System Intersections of Drug Addiction, Chronic Pain and Analgesia (R01) RFA-DA-09-017. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage investigations of CNS changes that occur with chronic pain, and how these changes parallel those that occur with drug addiction. Of interest will be how chronic pain changes the CNS, how analgesics of various classes impact pain-induced CNS changes, and how analgesics in the absence of pain (some of which have abuse potential) produce CNS changes. The temporal course of these changes will also be of interest. A focus of this research will be comparing and contrasting these CNS changes in an effort to identify shared and unique mechanisms involved in pain, analgesia and drug abuse, as well as environmental and genetic factors that influence these changes. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008: Application Due Date: January 28, 2009.

On October 24, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with NINDS, issued an RFA entitled Central Nervous System Intersections of Drug Addiction, Chronic Pain and Analgesia (R21) RFA-DA-09-018. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage investigations of CNS changes that occur with chronic pain and how these changes parallel those that occur with drug addiction. Of interest will be how chronic pain changes the CNS, how analgesics of various classes impact pain-induced CNS changes, and how analgesics in the absence of pain (some of which have abuse potential) produce CNS changes. The temporal course of these changes will also be of interest. A focus of this research will be comparing and contrasting these CNS changes in an effort to identify shared and unique mechanisms involved in pain, analgesia and drug abuse, as well as environmental and genetic factors that influence these changes. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 28, 2009.

On October 24, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with NINDS, issued an RFA entitled Central Nervous System Intersections of Drug Addiction, Chronic Pain and Analgesia (R03) RFA-DA-09-019. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage investigation of CNS changes that occur with chronic pain, and how these changes parallel those that occur with drug addiction. Of interest will be how chronic pain changes the CNS, how analgesics of various classes impact pain-induced CNS changes, and how analgesics in the absence of pain (some of which have abuse potential) produce CNS changes. The temporal course of these changes will also be of interest. A focus of this research will be comparing and contrasting these CNS changes in an effort to identify shared and unique mechanisms involved in pain, analgesia and drug abuse, as well as environmental and genetic factors that influence these changes. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 29, 2008; Application Due Date: January 28, 2009.

On November 13, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with NIMH, issued an RFA entitled Education Programs of Excellence in Scientifically Validated Behavioral Treatment (R25) RFA-MH-09-110. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support curriculum development to train clinician-scientists who can develop, test, and rapidly translate into practice innovative learning-based treatments in the addictive and mental disorders. A clinician-scientist is skilled in both clinical practice and clinical research. The goals in establishing the Programs of Excellence Award are to recognize and enhance current clinical training programs that teach and develop research-based clinical practices and to provide a model for clinician education nationwide. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: December 14, 2008; Application Due Date: January 14, 2009.

On December 12, 2008 NIDA, in collaboration with NIAAA, issued an RFA entitled Support Opportunity for Addiction Research (SOAR) for New Investigators (R03) RFA-DA-09-021. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is intended to support new investigator's on-going basic or clinical alcohol, drug abuse and/or related co-morbidity research. The primary goal of this Support Opportunity for Addiction Research (SOAR) is for new investigators to leverage existing research programs in order to strengthen, possibly expand, and/or further develop alcohol, drug abuse, and co-morbidity research. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: February 3, 2009; Application Due Date: March 3, 2009.

On December 30, 2008, NIDA, in collaboration with NINDS and NIAAA, issued an RFA entitled Optimization of Small Molecule Probes for the Nervous System (R21) RFA-NS-09-003. The aim of this FOA is to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule probes for investigating biological function in the nervous system by providing funding for advanced medicinal chemistry and the biological testing of compounds. Eligible Investigators will have identified probe candidates via screening of small molecule collections, using in vitro assays of biological activity developed to interrogate these collections, and be able to show that the structural features of these small molecules are related to their biological activity. Project proposals should nominate small molecule probe candidates from distinct structural series for the further, iterative design and testing of analogues in structure-activity relationship studies, using in vitro assays of biological function adapted to the medium throughput screening requirements of this work. These studies should have the goal of developing a small molecule probe possessing the attributes (eg: affinity, selectivity, activity) required for its use in future pharmacological studies proposed by the investigator. Applicants are strongly encouraged to utilize publicly available cheminformatic capabilities for the acquisition of compounds, and semi-custom synthesis of analogues, which is required of these studies. Letters of Intent Receipt Date for this RFA: February 3, 2009; Application Due Date: March 3, 2009.

On January 13, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with NIAAA, issued a Program Announcement entitled Senior Scientist Research and Mentorship Award (K05) (PA-09-076). The purpose of the Senior Scientist Research and Mentorship Award (K05) is intended to provide protected time for outstanding senior scientists who have demonstrated a sustained high level of productivity conducting biomedical research relevant to the scientific mission of the appropriate institute to focus on their research and to provide mentoring of new investigators. The overall goal of NIH-supported career development programs is to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists are available in adequate numbers and in appropriate research areas to address the Nation's biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs.

On January 22, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other NIH components, issued a Program Announcement entitled PHS 2009-02 Omnibus Solicitation of the NIH for Small Business Technology Transfer Grant Applications (Parent STTR [R41/R42]) (PA-09-081). This FOA invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications. United States SBCs that have the research capabilities and technological expertise to contribute to the R&D mission(s) of the NIH awarding components identified in this FOA are encouraged to submit STTR grant applications in response to identified topics.

On January 22, 2009, NIDA, in collaboration with numerous other DHHS components, issued a Program Announcement entitled PHS 2009-02 Omnibus Solicitation of the NIH, CDC, FDA and ACF for Small Business Innovation Research Grant Applications (Parent SBIR [R43/R44]) (PA-09-080). This FOA invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications. United States SBCs that have the research capabilities and technological expertise to contribute to the R&D mission(s) of the NIH, CDC, FDA and ACF awarding components identified in this FOA are encouraged to submit SBIR grant applications in response to identified topics.

Other Program Activities

The Recruitment & Training Program for Under-represented Populations is now accepting applications for Summer 2009. The NIDA IRP Recruitment & Training Program for Under-represented Populations (RTURP) is an intramural program that provides training opportunities for students from under-represented groups who are interested in the scientific basis of drug abuse. In this program, students gain basic science and/or clinical laboratory experience, attend student seminars and participate in a summer poster presentation. The goal of this program is to expose students to the realities of research, from experimental design to data analysis, interpretation and presentation. To request an application or to receive additional information, contact: Christie Brannock at cbrann@intra.nida.nih.gov.

Clinical Trials Network (CTN) Update

Protocols: A total of 39 protocols have been initiated since 2001, including multi-site clinical trials (26), multi-site surveys (3), studies in special populations (5), and secondary analyses of data across various trials (5). Twenty trials have completed data lock; two are in the follow-up, data-lock phase; two are currently enrolling and two will enroll patients in 2009. In addition, 18 ancillary studies have been supported by CTN and non-CTN funds. Seven protocols are in the development phase. Nearly 9,500 participants have enrolled in studies.

Primary outcome papers are published and dissemination materials have been developed with CSAT's ATTC on the following:

  • Protocol CTN 0001, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Inpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0002, Buprenorphine/Naloxone versus Clonidine for Outpatient Opiate Detoxification
  • Protocol CTN 0005, MI (Motivational Interviewing) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0006, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Drug Free Clinics
    Protocol CTN 0007, Motivational Incentives for Enhanced Drug Abuse Recovery: Methadone Clinics
  • Protocol CTN 0010, Buprenorphine/Naloxone-Facilitated Rehabilitation for Heroin Addicted Adolescents/Young Adults.

Primary outcome papers are published or in press for:

  • Protocol CTN 0003, Bup/Nx: Comparison of Two Taper Schedules
  • Protocol CTN 0004, MET (Motivational Enhancement Treatment) To Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome in Subjects Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Protocol CTN 0008, A Baseline for Investigating Diffusion of Innovation
  • Protocol CTN 0009, Smoking Cessation Treatment with Transdermal Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0011, A Feasibility Study of a Telephone Enhancement Procedure (TELE) to Improve Participation in Continuing Care Activities
  • Protocol CTN 0012, Characteristics of Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C Viral Infection, and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs
  • Protocol CTN 0013 (Motivational Enhancement Therapy to Improve Treatment Utilization and Outcome In Pregnant Substance Abusers)
  • Protocol CTN 0016, Patient Feedback: A Performance Improvement Study in Outpatient Addiction Treatment
  • Protocol CTN 0018 (Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Men in Drug Abuse Treatment)
  • Protocol CTN 0019 (Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Women in Drug Abuse Treatment)

In addition, the following protocols have submitted primary papers:

  • Protocol CTN 0015 (Women's Treatment for Trauma and Substance Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial)
  • Protocol CTN 0021 (Motivational Enhancement Treatment to Improve Treatment Engagement and Outcome for Spanish-Speaking Individuals Seeking Treatment for Substance Abuse). This is the first Spanish-only protocol in the CTN
  • Protocol CTN 0029, A Pilot Study of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) in Initiating and Maintaining Abstinence in Smokers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

The following protocol has locked the data:

  • Protocol CTN 0014, Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers (BSFT)

The following protocols have ended new enrollment, and are in the follow-up or data-lock phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0028, Randomized Controlled Trial of Osmotic-Release Methylphenidate (OROS MPH) for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders (SUD) (anticipate lock January 2009)
  • Protocol CTN 0030, Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) is a randomized 2-phase, open-label, multi-center study in outpatient treatment settings. Pre-screening began in May 2006. The study is being carried out in 9 sites, and reached its enrollment target of 648 participants. The last participant into phase 1 was randomized on November 11, 2008. Randomization of enrolled patients into phase 2 continues.
  • CTN 0030A1, Collection of Economic Data for the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study. This ancillary study is conducted in collaboration with NIDA DESPR.
  • CTN 0030A2, Effects of Chronic Opioids is conducted in collaboration with NIDA DCNBR to obtain anatomical MR scans in subjects with a history of opioid use to evaluate neural changes that may occur with such use and compare with age/gender healthy controls.
  • CTN 0030A3, POATS Long-Term Follow Up Study (LTFU) is being developed to examine long-term outcomes for individuals with opioid analgesic (OA) dependence who participated in CTN-0030.

Two protocols are currently enrolling:

  • Protocol CTN 0027, Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies (START) is a randomized, open-label, multi-center study that was developed in collaboration with the Division of Pharmacotherapies & Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMCDA). Enrollment began in April 2006. As of November 30, 2008, there were 943 randomized participants.
  • CTN 0027A1, START Pharmacogenetics: Exploratory Genetic Studies In Starting Treatment With Agonist Replacement Therapies.
  • CTN-0027A2, Retention of Suboxone Patients in START: Perspectives of Providers and Patients. The overall purposes of the supplemental study are to identify and assess barriers for retaining Suboxone patients.
  • Protocol CTN 0031, Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step (STAGE-12): Evaluation of a Combined Individual-Group Intervention to Reduce Stimulant and Other Drug Use by Increasing 12-Step Involvement. As of November 30, 2008, all ten sites (three Wave 1, seven Wave 2) are actively recruiting and have randomized a total of 111 participants to either the STAGE-12 or the TAU condition.
  • CTN 0031A1, An Evaluation of Neurocognitive Function, Oxidative Damage, and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Methamphetamine and Cocaine Abusers. Potential participants are being recruited at six sites. As of November 30, 2008, 58 participants have been enrolled in this ancillary study.
  • CTN 0031A2, The Role of Alcohol Consumption in Classifications of Alcohol Use Disorders: A Clinical Study. It investigates the utility of adding a frequency measure of alcohol consumption (i.e., the first three items of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT-C]), to the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders. This study is funded by an MOU between NIDA and NIAAA. Data will be collected for this study throughout the life of the main STAGE-12 study.
  • CTN 0031A3, Organizational and Practitioner Influences on Implementation of STAGE-12. The study assesses the influence of counselor and organizational variables on fidelity of the STAGE-12 intervention during the clinical trial, tests the impact of fidelity on clinical trial participant outcomes, and explores the influence of counselor and organizational variables on sustainability of the STAGE-12 intervention following completion of the clinical trial. Study staff has already collected the organizational and counselor level data from all ten STAGE-12 sites. The baseline data obtained in this research will form the foundation for an R01 grant application.

The following protocols are in the development phase:

  • Protocol CTN 0032, HIV Rapid Testing and Counseling in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs in the U.S. This study seeks to evaluate the most effective strategy to ensure that persons in drug treatment programs are tested for HIV and receive their HIV test results. The protocol seeks to enroll more than 1,200 participants across approximately 12 sites in the US. Dr. Lisa Metsch is the PI at the Florida Node, and Dr. Grant Colfax is the co-PI at the CA/AZ node. All 12 sites have been selected, seven of which have received IRB approval through a central mechanism. An eight center received approval by the local IRB, and the four other centers are expected to have local IRB approval by the end of this 2008. Centers are located in Missouri, New Mexico, Arizona, South Carolina, North Carolina, Connecticut, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Oregon. Mandatory national training took place in Bethesda, MD from September 9 through September 12, with continuous post-training sessions by Webinar and face-to-face counselor training sessions. The electronic instruments, including Web-based ACASI have been completed and are being tested. Patient enrollment is planned to start on January 5, 2009.
  • CTN 0032A1, Economic Analysis of HIV Rapid Testing in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs. This is an ancillary study to protocol CTN 0032, to conduct an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of on-site HIV testing in drug abuse treatment settings vs referral for off-site testing. The PI is Dr. Bruce Schakman. The project is in collaboration with NIDA's DESPR.
  • Protocol CTN 0033, Methamphetamine Use among American Indians. The first area of research emphasis in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Strategic Plan on Reducing Health Disparities (2004 Revision) is the epidemiology of drug abuse, health consequences and infectious diseases among minority populations. The study is a collaboration among four Nodes: Pacific NW, Southwest, Oregon/Hawaii, and Ohio Valley. Investigators plan to start data collection in the fall.
  • Protocol CTN 0034, Developing Research Capacity and Culturally Appropriate Research Methods: Community-based Participatory Research Manual for Collaborative Research in Drug Abuse for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the Pacific Northwest Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0035, Access to HIV and Hepatitis Screening and Care among Ethnic Minority Drug Users In and Out of Drug Treatment. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the CA-AZ Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0036, Epidemiology and Ethnographic Survey of "Cheese" Heroin Use among Hispanics in Dallas County. This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the Texas Node.
  • Protocol CTN 0037, Exercise as a Treatment for Substance Use Disorders. This clinical trial will test the effectiveness of the addition of exercise in improving drug abuse treatment outcomes.
  • Protocol CTN 0044, Web-delivery of Evidence-Based, Psychosocial Treatment for Substance Use Disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of adding an interactive, web-based version of the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) intervention plus abstinence incentives as an adjunct to community-based, outpatient substance abuse treatment. The trial will randomize individuals entering outpatient treatment for substance use disorders to receive 24 weeks of either: (1) Treatment as Usual (TAU), reflecting standard treatment at the outpatient programs in which participants are enrolled, or (2) TAU plus the Therapeutic Education System (TES), a computerized psychosocial intervention with incentives targeting abstinence from one's primary drug of abuse. The primary outcome measure is drug abstinence (as measured via urine testing and confirmed via self-report) and will also evaluate if improved outcomes are maintained at 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Additionally, the study will perform a comprehensive economic analysis of adding TES to TAU.

In addition to the primary CTN trials, there are currently five secondary analyses using data across several of the completed trials:

  1. Gender Differences in the Prevalence and Predictors of HIV Risk Behaviors, PI: Audrey Brooks (CA/AZ Node);
  2. Pattern of alcohol use and alcohol-related diagnoses among drug abusing/dependent participants, PIs: Dennis Donovan and Bryan Hartzler (Pacific Northwest Node);
  3. The relationships between demographic characteristics of patients and therapists, measures of therapeutic process and therapeutic alliance, and outcomes, PIs: Alyssa Forcehimes (Southwest Node) and Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node);
  4. The Efficacy of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for African Americans, PI: Kathleen Burlew (Ohio Valley Node);
  5. Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes in Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations, PI: Carmen Masson (California-Arizona Node).

There are also about 40 funded studies supported by independent grants that use CTN studies as a platform.




NIDA's New and Competing Continuation Grants Awarded Since September 2008

Aizenman, Elias -- University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
Methamphetamine Induces a Complex Microglia-Neuronal Crosstalk

Alexander-Eitzman, Ben E. -- Washington University
Substance Abuse, Marginalization, and Homelessness: A Bayesian Perspective

Altice, Frederick L. -- Yale University
Intervention of HIV, Drug Use and the Criminal Justice System in Malaysia

Beeler, Jeff A. -- University of Chicago
Pharmacological Targets Facilitating Non-Drug Reward and Extinction of Drug-Seeking

Benoit, Ellen -- National Development and Research Institutes
Feasibility of Recruiting Nondisclosing Black MSM/W for Drug Use /HIV Research

Berwid, Olga G. -- Queens College
Impact of Stimulant Treatment on Neural Reward Circuitry Functioning in ADHD

Bilbo, Staci D. -- Duke University
Early Life Origins of Risk and Resilience to Drugs of Abuse: Role of Glial Priming

Borrelli, Emiliana -- University of California, Irvine
Presynaptic Versus Postsynaptic Functions of Dopamine D2 Receptors in the Response

Botvin, Gilbert J. -- Weill Medical College of Cornell University
A Collaborative System Approach for the Diffusion of Evidence-Based Prevention

Brady, Kathleen T. -- Medical University of South Carolina
The Impact of Real-Time fMRI Feedback on Response to Nicotine Cues

Brenhouse, Heather C. -- McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA)
Facilitating Extinction in Adolescents

Brisson, Anne Elizabeth -- Columbia University, New York Morningside
Shield Central Asia: HIV Prevention with Injection Drug Users in Kyrgyzstan

Brouwer, Kimberly C. -- University of California, San Diego
HIV and STI Transmission Dynamics along Transport Routes Linking the Americas

Buch, Shilpa J. -- University of Kansas Medical Center
PLGA/Antisense IL-10: Gene Therapy for Cocaine Abusers with HAD

Burke, Jessica G. -- University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh
Patterns of Substance Use Among HIV Positive and Negative Aging MSM

Carroll, Frank I. -- Research Triangle Institute
Development of Ligands for Nicotinic Receptors

Carvelli, Lucia -- Vanderbilt University
Amphetamine Regulation of DAT Function in C Elegans

Cassidy, Jude A. -- University of Maryland, College Park Campus
Distress Tolerance: Links with Family Emotional Climate and Adolescent HIV Risk

Castillo, Pablo -- Yeshiva University
Presynaptic Forms of Long-Term Plasticity in the CNS

Chartoff, Elena H. -- McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA)
Role of AMPA Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Morphine Dependence

Chavkin, Charles -- University of Washington
The Role of Kappa Opioid Receptor-Induced Activation of Astrocytes

Chen, Chu -- Louisiana State University HSC, New Orleans
Astroglial Cells in Marijuana-Altered Synaptic Plasticity

Childress, Anna R. -- University of Pennsylvania
1 of 2: Real-Time fMRI Pattern Training for Treatment of Craving and Addiction

Chiu, Pearl H. -- Baylor College of Medicine
Localized and Distributed Real-Time fMRI Approaches to Facilitate Self Control

Chung, Hwan -- Michigan State University
A New Approach for the Analysis of Stage-Sequential Process in Substance Use Behavior

Cohen, Mark S. -- University of California, Los Angeles
Real-Time Automated Detection of Craving States with fMRI and EEG

Corso, Phaedra S. -- University of Georgia (UGA)
Economic Evaluation of Drug Abuse Prevention with Rural African American Youth

Cristea, Ileana M. -- Princeton University
Proteomic Tools to Uncover the Role of Chromatin Remodeling in HIV-1 Infection

De Lecea, Luis -- Stanford University
Optogenetic Manipulation of Brain Reward

Deleo, Joyce A. -- Dartmouth College
Microglial Regulation in Opioid Tolerance, Hyperalgesia and Addiction

Dewhurst, Stephen -- University of Rochester
Cerebrovascular Mechanisms in Methamphetamine-Mediated Exacerbation of NeuroAIDS

Dobs, Adrian S. -- Johns Hopkins University
Serum Sex Hormones and Cardiovascular Risk in the MACS

Dodge, Tonya -- Skidmore College
Steroid Use in Adolescents

D'onofrio, Gail -- Yale University
Models of SBIRT for Opioid Dependent Patients in the Emergency Department

Eby, Lillian T. -- University of Georgia (UGA)
Understanding the Adoption and Implementation of Tobacco-Free Regulation

Eisch, Amelia J. -- University of Texas, SW Medical Center/Dallas
Opiates and Adult Neurogenesis

El-Bassel, Nabila -- Columbia University, New York Morningside
Multimedia HIV/STI Prevention for Drug-Involved Female Offenders

Elmer, Gregory I. -- University of Maryland, Baltimore
Pattern Array: In Vivo Mining for Novel Psychoactive Drug Discovery

Foa, Edna B. -- University of Pennsylvania
Treatment of Smoking among Individuals with PTSD

Fountain, Stephen B. -- Kent State University at Kent
Adolescent Nicotine Exposure and Adult Cognitive Processes in Rats

Fox, Howard S. -- University of Nebraska Medical Center
Proteomic Strategies for AIDS and Drug Abuse - HIV and METH CNS Synergy

Friedmann, Peter D. -- Rhode Island Hospital (Providence, RI)
Treatment Study Using Depot Naltrexone (2/6) Rhode Island Protocol Treatment Site

Frost, Simon David William -- University of California, San Diego
Examining the Role of Venues in Structuring Sexual and Drug-Use Networks

Gabuzda, Dana H. -- Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
LPS and Monocyte Activation in HIV Neuropathogenesis

Gould, Thomas J. -- Temple University
Genetic, Behavioral, and Neurobiological Substrates of Nicotine Withdrawal

Groopman, Jerome E. -- Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Inhibition of HIV at the Immune Synapse Utilizing Novel Ligands and Receptors

Gu, Howard H. -- Ohio State University
Mechanism of Drug Addiction

Hammond, Donna L. -- University of Iowa
Role of Medullary Substance P in Acute and Persistent Nociception

Hammond, Donna L. -- University of Iowa
Opioid Mechanisms of Analgesia

Haydon, Philip G. -- Tufts University, Boston
Roles for Gliotransmission in Substance Abuse

Hien, Denise A. -- City College of New York
A Randomized Trial of Concurrent Treatment for PTSD and Substance Dependence

Ho, Wenzhe -- Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Methamphetamine and HIV Infection

Ho, Wenzhe -- Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Drug Abuse, Sustance P and HIV

Hobrath, Judith Varady -- Southern Research Institute
Development of Opioid Receptor Models for Rational Design of Bifunctional Ligands

Hser, Yih-Ing -- University of California, Los Angeles
Reducing HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse: Linking Compulsory Rehabilitation to Methadone

Hughes, John R. -- University of Vermont and State Agricultural College
Natural History of Attempts to Stop Smoking

Hughes, John R. -- University of Vermont and State Agricultural College
Attempts to Stop/Reduce Marijuana among Dependent Users

Jiang, Faming -- Sri International
Development of Photoaffinity Ligands for the Alpha3beta4 Nicotinic Acetylcholine

Johnson, Eric O. -- Research Triangle Institute
Genome-Wide Association Study of HIV-1 Host Genetics among Injection Drug Users

Kandel, Denise B. -- Columbia University Health Sciences
Nicotine Dependence in Early Adulthood

Keefe, Kristen A. -- University of Utah
Long-Term Consequences of Methamphetamine Toxicity

Kenny, Paul J. -- Scripps Research Institute
Role of Micrornas in the Mechanisms of Drug Dependence

Kharasch, Evan D. -- Washington University
Methadone and HIV Drug Interactions

Knackstedt, Lori A. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Striatal Glutamate Homeostasis and Cocaine Relapse

Knopik, Valerie S. -- Brown University
Prenatal Tobacco Exposure: Effects on Neuropsychological Outcomes and ADHD

Koek, Wouter -- University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
Vulnerability to Opioids: A Mouse Model

Kosten, Thomas R. -- Baylor College of Medicine
Multisite Controlled Trial of Cocaine Vaccine (1of 6) Lead Site/Houston Treatment

Kral, Alexander H. -- Research Triangle Institute
International Feasibility Study of Pharmacy-Based HIV Prevention: San Francisco

Kumar, Anil -- University of Missouri, Kansas City
Methamphetamine and AIDS in a Non-Human Primate Model

Lai, Shenghan -- Johns Hopkins University
HIV Infection, Cocaine Use and Coronary Artery Disease In HIV+ African Americans

Lattal, Kennon Matthew -- Oregon Health and Science University
Behavioral and Epigenetic Mechanisms in Extinction of Cocaine-Induced Memories

Leonard, Noelle R. -- National Development and Research Institutes
Prevention Intervention for Drug Use and Related Behaviors with Incarcerated Youth

Letourneau, Elizabeth J. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Targeting HIV Risk Behaviors in Juvenile Drug Court-Involved Youth

Levin, Frances R. -- Columbia University Health Sciences
Multi-Site Controlled Trial of Cocaine Vaccine (6 of 6) Columbia University Site

Lile, Joshua Anthony -- University of Kentucky
GABA Drugs for Cannabis-Use Disorders: Initial Mechanistic Studies in Humans

Lochman, John E. -- University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa
Individual and Group Intervention Formats with Aggressive Children

Lyons, Thomas M. -- University of Illinois at Chicago
HIV Prevention for MSM Stimulant Users Focused on Healthy Sexuality

Mains, Richard E. -- University of Connecticut School of Medicine/Dentistry
Dissecting the Role of One Neuronal RhoGEF amongst Many: The Kalirin-7 Null Mouse

Markham, Richard B. -- Johns Hopkins University
Effect of Cocaine and LTR Polymorphism on HIV-1 Pathogenesis

Marlowe, Douglas B. -- Treatment Research Institute, Inc. (TRI)
Adaptive Services in Drug Court

Mason, Graeme F. -- Yale University
GABA Effects of Nicotine in Men and Women

McCance-Katz, Elinore F. -- University of California, San Francisco
Disulfiram Interactions with HIV Medications: Clinical Implications

McClernon, Francis Joseph -- Duke University
Brain Substrates of Extinction-Based Treatment for Nicotine Dependence

McCurdy, Sheryl A. -- University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
Tanzania Aids Prevention Project - Vijana Wateja (Young Injectors) Study

McKay, Mary M. -- Mount Sinai School of Medicine of NYU
Family-Based Intervention for HIV+ Youth in Argentina

Mello, Nancy K. -- McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA)
Sex/Gender Factors in Nicotine Addiction

Meyer, Jerrold S. -- University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Neurobehavioral Effects of Combined MDMA (Ecstasy) and THC Exposure

Mocchetti, Italo -- Georgetown University
HIV Drug Abusers, Polymorphisms and Brain Plasticity

Monks, Terrence J. -- University of Arizona
Hepatic Metabolism and Susceptibility to Ecstasy Toxicity

Montaner, Julio Sergio Gonzalez -- University of California, San Diego
Seek and Treat for Optimal Outcomes and Prevention in HIV & AIDS in IDU

Moron-Concepcion, Jose A. -- University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston
Mechanisms Underlying Opiate-Induced Neuroplasticity at the Synapse

Morral, Andrew R. -- Rand Corporation
Case-Mix-Adjustment for Adolescent Treatment

Murai, Keith Kazuo -- McGill University
Role of TNFalpha in Synaptic Homeostasis in Response to Drugs of Abuse

Nader, Michael A. -- Wake Forest University Health Sciences
Dopamine D2 Receptors in Primate Models of Cocaine Abuse

Nair, Madhavan P. -- Florida International University
Role of Cocaine in Neuro-AIDS by HIV 1B and C Clades

Nichols, David E. -- Purdue University, West Lafayette
Stereochemical Aspects of Hallucinogenesis

Nikulina, Ella M. -- University of Arizona
BDNF in Frontal Cortex and Social Stress-Induced Sensitization

Nunes, Edward V. -- New York State Psychiatric Institute
Treatment Studies Using Depot Naltrexone (4/6) Columbia Protocol Treatment Site

Otto-Salaj, Laura L. -- University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Etiology of Sexual Risk, Substance Abuse, and Trauma: A Bioecological Systems Model

Paige, Mikell A. -- Georgetown University
Design and Synthesis of New Neuronal nAChR Silent Desensitizers for Drug Abuse

Pentel, Paul R. -- Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Inc.
Multivalent Vaccine for Opiate Addiction

Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora Irma -- University of New Mexico
Role of Micrornas and RNA-Binding Proteins in Addiction-Related Gene Expression

Pleasure, Samuel Jeremy -- University of California, San Francisco
Defective Forebrain Development in Mutant Mice

Poduska, Jeanne Marie -- American Institutes for Research
Scaling-Up Prevention Services for Early Drug Abuse Risk in School Systems

Polcin, Douglas L. -- Public Health Institute
Intensive Motivational Interviewing for Methamphetamine Dependence

Potts, Jeffrey Thomas -- University of North Texas Health Science Center
Hybrid Atomic Force-Optical Imaging System to Investigate Prenatal Nicotine

Potula, Raghava -- Temple University
Meth-Induced T Cell Dysfunction: Role in HIV-1 Immunopathogenesis

Prado, Guillermo -- University of Miami School of Medicine
Familias Unidas Stage III Study: Preventing Substance Abuse in Hispanic Youth

Prochaska, James O. -- University of Rhode Island
Comparing Population Cessation Services with Emphasis on Unmotivated Smokers

Rakic, Pasko -- Yale University
Origin of Cortical Species-Specific Distinctions

Ramsay, Douglas S. -- University of Washington
Drug-Induced Allostasis and Its Motivational Effects during Adolescence

Renshaw, Perry F. -- University of Utah
Longitudinal Neuroimaging of Metamphetamine-Dependent Adolescents

Resnick, Heidi S. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Prevention of Postrape Drug Abuse: Replication Study

Rogers, Thomas J. -- Temple University
Opioid Modulation of Inflammatory Monocyte Activity Involved in HIV Susceptibility

Roitman, Jamie D. -- University of Illinois at Chicago
Neural Basis of Decisions about Uncertain Rewards

Ruger, Jennifer P. -- Yale University
Economic Evaluation of Drug Abuse Treatment and HIV Prevention Services

Rush, Craig R. -- University of Kentucky
GABAA Modulation as a Target for Developing Medications for Methamphetamine Abuse

Rush, Craig R. -- University of Kentucky
Agonist Replacement Therapy for Methamphetamine Dependence: Human Lab Studies

Salvemini, Daniela -- Saint Louis University
Role of Ceramide in Morphine Hyperalgesia and Tolerance

Schoenbaum, Geoffrey M. -- University of Maryland, Baltimore
Corticolimbic Encoding of Conditioned Reinforcers: Relevance to Addiction

Shafer, Michael S. -- Arizona State University-Tempe Campus
The Arizona Network for the Study of Implementation Effectiveness

Shedlin, Michele G. -- University of Texas, El Paso
Substance Abuse and Health Vulnerability: Colombian Refugees in Ecuador

Simpson, D. D. -- Texas Christian University
Sustainable HIV Risk Reduction Strategies for CJ Systems

Smith, Richard D. -- Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories
HIV Proteomic Center for Host-Viral Response Characterization

Staley, Julie K. -- Yale University
Tobacco Smoking, Genes and Nicotinic Receptors

Sterk, Claire E. -- Emory University
Neighborhood Effects on HIV Risk-Taking

Stitzer, Maxine L. -- Johns Hopkins University
Multi-site Controlled Trial of Cocaine Vaccine (3 of 6) Baltimore Treatment Site

Sulkowski, Mark S. -- Johns Hopkins University
HCV Disease Management in HIV- HCV Coinfected IDUS

Sun, Wenlin -- University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Neural Mechanisms of Extinction-Mediated Inhibition of Relapse to Cocaine-Seeking

Surratt, Hilary L. -- University of Delaware
The Diversion of Antiretroviral Medications to Street Markets

Svikis, Dace S. -- Virginia Commonwealth University
Computer vs Therapist-Delivered Brief Intervention for Drug Abuse in Primary Care

Swartz, James Anthony -- University of Illinois at Chicago
A Life Course Perspective Model of HIV Risk and Substance Use Patterns among MSM

Szumlinski, Karen K. -- University of California, Santa Barbara
Homer-Mediated Signaling and Cocaine Addiction

Thio, Chloe L. -- Johns Hopkins University
Liver Disease and Drug Use in the HAART

Traube, Dorian E. -- University of Southern California
Drugs, Sexual Impulsivity, HIV: Psychosocial and Cognitive Risk Factors of YMSM

Valdez, Avelardo -- University of Houston
At Risk Hispanic Gangs: Long-Term Consequences for HIV, Hepatitis and STI

Van Der Kouwe, Andre Jan Willem -- Massachusetts General Hospital
Functional Spectroscopy with Real-Time Feedback for Altering Preferences in Addicts

Vandrey, Ryan G. -- Johns Hopkins University
Effects of Zolpidem Extended-Release on Withdrawal and Sleep in Cannabis Users

Velasquez, Mary Marden -- University of Texas, Austin
Multidisciplinary Approach to Reduce Injury and Substance Abuse

Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar -- University of Colorado, Denver
Nicotinic Receptors in Glia-Neuron Interactions

Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar -- University of Colorado, Denver
Nicotinic Signaling in the Brain

Watson, Stanley J. -- University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Cocaine Regulation of miRNAs in Rats with Differing Vulnerability to Drug Abuse

Webster, John Matthew -- University of Kentucky
A Web-Based Employment Intervention for Drug Court Participants

White, Fletcher A. -- Loyola University Chicago
Chemokine-Mediated Modulaton of Opioid-Induced Pain

White, William -- University of Connecticut School of Medicine/Dentistry
Contingency Management for Initiating Smoking Abstinence

Wiebe, Sandra A. -- University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Prenatal Tobacco Exposure, Self Regulation, Externalizing Behaviors in Early Childhood

Woodward, John J. -- Medical University of South Carolina
Neural Actions of Toluene

Yankee, Thomas M. -- University of Kansas Medical Center
The Effects of Morphine on the Immune Responses against HIV in Vivo

Yu, Xiao-Fang -- Johns Hopkins University
A Novel Allele Influencing HIV Infection among Injection Drug Users

Zahniser, Nancy R. -- University of Colorado, Denver
Individual Differences in Cocaine Activation/Reward and the Dopamine Transporter

Zhang, Yan -- Virginia Commonwealth University
Non-Peptide Mu Opioid Receptor Selective Antagonists

Zubieta, Jon-Kar -- University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Development and Use of rtfMRI for Self-control of Nicotine Craving


Index

Research Findings

Program Activities

Extramural Policy and Review Activities

Congressional Affairs

International Activities

Meetings and Conferences

Media and Education Activities

Planned Meetings

Publications

Staff Highlights

Grantee Honors



Archive Home | Accessibility | Privacy | FOIA (NIH) | Current NIDA Home Page
National Institutes of Health logo_Department of Health and Human Services Logo The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Questions? See our Contact Information. . The U.S. government's official web portal