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Director's Report to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse - February, 2006



Congressional Affairs (Prepared January 25, 2006)

BUDGET FY 2006

In late December, the Congress concluded its action on the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Bill with an NIH Budget Authority level of $28.617 billion. They also concluded action on the Department of Defense Appropriations Bill that contains a 1% across-the-board cut to non-emergency, non-discretionary programs. The NIH share of this cut is $286 million.

NIDA's FY 2006 budget is $1,000,029,000, a decrease of 0.6% from the FY 2005 level. This figure includes funds set aside for NIH Roadmap and Neuroscience Blueprint initiatives.

Other Hearings and Briefings of Interest

Congressional Meth Caucus Roundtable Discussion

September 25, 2005 - Two dozen members of the Congressional Caucus to Fight and Control Methamphetamine hosted a roundtable discussion with several federal agency representatives. NIDA Director Dr. Nora Volkow joined executive branch colleagues from the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Drug Enforcement Administration, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency in discussing with Caucus members a variety of methamphetamine related issues.

HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse Hill Briefing Sponsored by the Friends of NIDA

October 25, 2005 - Behaviors associated with drug use have been shown to be among some of the most prominent and robust predictors of HIV transmission in the United States. In fact, injection drug use has directly and indirectly accounted for more than one-third (36 percent) of AIDS cases in the United States. Drug use also affects judgment about sexual risks and thereby increases the likelihood of transmitting or acquiring HIV through unprotected sex. Evidence suggests, however, that drug abuse treatment can help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS, especially when combined with prevention and community-based outreach programs for at-risk individuals. Because these efforts can reduce or eliminate drug use and drug-related HIV risk behaviors, the Friends of NIDA hosted an educational briefing on Capitol Hill to raise awareness about the relationship between drug use and HIV infection.

The briefing, entitled "Drug Use and HIV/AIDS: Breaking the Cycle of Infection," was the third in a series this year organized and sponsored by the Friends of NIDA. As with past briefings, this event was designed to educate congressional staff and other policymakers on an important drug abuse and addiction research topic. The Friends of NIDA coordinated with the Chairs of the Addiction, Treatment and Recovery Caucus to find space and garner support for the briefing. Attendance was strong, with a standing room only crowd of over 100 guests.

NIDA Director Nora Volkow, MD, provided an overview of NIDA's HIV/AIDS research portfolio, noting, among other issues, the alarming change in patterns of transmission disproportionately affecting African American women. Psychologist Robert Booth, PhD, a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, described his experiences as an HIV prevention researcher leading the community-based SAFE program in Denver. Finally, Ms. Patricia Nalls, Founder and Executive Director of a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization, The Women's Collective, provided her personal perspective as an HIV-positive woman helping other women deal with HIV-related issues.

For further information and some photographs of the event, go to http://www.apa.org/ppo/spin/1005.html.

Methamphetamine Hearing

November 17, 2005 - The House Education and the Workforce Subcommittee on Education Reform conducted a hearing on "Combating Methamphetamines through Prevention and Education." Subcommittee Chairman Michael Castle (R-DE) provided an opening statement before Subcommittee Member Tom Osborne (R-NE) took the chair at the hearing. Among the witnesses providing testimony was NIDA grantee Richard Spoth, Ph.D., Director, Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute at Iowa State University.

Representative Castle expressed that this hearing was intended to give Subcommittee members the opportunity to learn about effective programs operating around the country. Congressman Osborne, leading the hearing, spoke specifically about the impact of methamphetamine addiction on children and families, and also highlighted the direct and indirect costs of methamphetamine use and addiction. In his later comments, Congressman Osborne also advocated for age-appropriate prevention efforts where messages are targeted at younger children, noting that drug use often starts before a young person is 13 years old. Congressman Mark Souder (R-IN) framed the nation's problem with methamphetamine as a health crisis. Asserting that a focus on the supply of drugs is critical to the nation's drug control policy, Congressman Souder also argued that illicit drug use cannot be eradicated without prevention, treatment and research. Dr. Spoth discussed results from studies of drug prevention programs that have demonstrated the effectiveness of a number of school- and community-based prevention efforts. In identifying factors that result in better outcomes, Dr. Spoth highlighted using existing school infrastructure, forging and reinforcing strategic partnerships, and using evidence-based interventions in prevention and education programming.

U.S. Senators' National Town Hall on Methamphetamine Awareness and Prevention

January 23, 2006 - To address the dangers methamphetamine abuse and addiction exact on our nation's communities and families, Senators Norm Coleman (R-MN), Conrad Burns (R-MT), Max Baucus (D-MT), Mark Pryor (D-AR), and Chuck Hagel (R-NE) hosted a National Town Hall on Methamphetamine Awareness and Prevention. U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and Drug Czar John Walters of the Office of National Drug Control Policy made opening remarks and during the three panel sessions during the town hall, the Senators were joined by state and national panelists. NIDA Director Dr. Nora Volkow was on one panel, and made remarks and responded to questions from the Senators and members of the public. According to the Senate sponsors, the event was assembled as a national forum in which to understand the use and widespread impact of the drug, as well as seek ways to inform the public, deter use, and examine possible legislative initiatives to further combat meth.

PASSED BILLS OF INTEREST — 109th Congress

H.R. 3 - This law was originally introduced by Representative Young (R-AK) as the "Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users," a bill to authorize funds for federal aid for highways, highway safety programs, and transit programs. The original House version of this bill included language (Section 2013 "Drug Impaired Driving Research and Prevention Act") that would require the development of a model statute for States relating to drug impaired driving. The model would include threshold levels of impairment for a controlled substance; methods for detecting the presence of controlled substances; and penalties for drug impaired driving. It would be based on recommendations contained in a report to be developed by NIH and submitted to Congress not later than 18 months after the date of enactment. The final version of the law maintains the requirements for model statute development, and for a report to be developed on the problem of drug-impaired driving. The Secretary of Transportation will develop the report, "in cooperation with the National Institutes of Health." The President signed the bill into law (109-59) on August 10, 2005.

H.R. 2520/S. 1317 - On December 20, 2005 the President signed into law, as Public Law 109-129, the Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act of 2005. H.R. 2520 passed the House on May 24, 2005. An amended version passed the Senate on December 16, 2005 and the House on December 17, 2005. The bill does not have a direct impact on NIH. It would require the Secretary of HHS, acting through the Director of the Health Resources and Services Administration, to establish the C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplantation Program, a network of cord blood banks to facilitate the use of cord blood for transplantation purposes. Cord blood units that are collected, but not appropriate for clinical use, would be required to be made available for peer-reviewed research.

S. 45/H.R. 869 - Senator Carl Levin (D-MI) in the Senate and Representative Mark Souder (R-IN) in the House introduced identical bills to amend the Controlled Substances Act to lift the patient limitation on prescribing drug addiction treatments by medical practitioners in group practices, and for other purposes. Both the House and Senate passed their bills prior to their recess, and the President signed the bill into law (P.L. 109-56) on August 2, 2005. This law will impact practices that prescribe buprenorphine products for treatment of opiate addiction, making the medication available to more patients across the country.

S. 518/H.R. 1132 - Senator Sessions (R-AL) in the Senate and Representative Whitfield (R-KY) in the House introduced identical bills, the "National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act of 2005." This law (P.L. 109-60) will provide for the establishment of a controlled substance monitoring program in each State; it was signed by the President on August 11, 2005.

BILLS OF INTEREST - SENATE

[For the full text and additional information about any bill, go to the Library of Congress website at http://thomas.loc.gov]

S. 103 - Senator Talent (R-MO) introduced on January 24, 2005 the "Combat Meth Act of 2005," a bill to respond to the illegal production, distribution, and use of methamphetamine in the United States, and for other purposes. Among many things, the bill would have SAMHSA establish a methamphetamine research, training, and technical assistance center "Éin consultation with the Director of the National Institutes of HealthÉ" The bill was passed by the Senate on September 9, 2005, in the form of an amendment to the Commerce, Justice, Science FY 2006 appropriation bill (HR 2662). Subsequent legislative action saw the bill attached to the USA Patriot Act, an effort to get it passed late in the session. Ultimately, the language was removed from the conference report on the Patriot Act. Floor action is expected early in 2006. Related Bills: See H.R. 314, H.R. 3889.

S. 259 - Senator Johnson (D-SD) introduced on February 2, 2005 a bill to require that federal forfeiture funds be used, in part, to clean up methamphetamine laboratories. Committee: Judiciary.

S. 408 - Senator DeWine (R-OH) introduced on February 16, 2005 the "STOP Underage Drinking Act." In part, the bill would authorize the Director of ONDCP to award "enhancement grants" to eligible entities to design, test, evaluate and disseminate strategies to maximize the effectiveness of community-wide approaches to preventing and reducing underage drinking. Committee: Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Related Bills: See H.R. 864.

S. 521 - Senator Hutchison (R-TX) introduced on March 3, 2005 the "Hepatitis C Epidemic Control and Prevention Act," a bill to amend the Public Health Service Act to direct the Secretary HHS to establish, promote, and support a comprehensive prevention, research, and medical management referral program for hepatitis C virus infection. Committee: Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Related Bills: See H.R. 1290.

S. 537 - Senator Bingaman (D-NM) introduced on March 7, 2005 the "Child Healthcare Crisis Relief Act" a bill to increase the number of well-trained mental health service professionals (including those based in schools) providing clinical mental health care to children and adolescents, and for other purposes. Committee: Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Related Bills: See H.R. 1106.

S. 550 - On September 21, former Senator John Corzine (D-NJ) introduced S. 550, the Microbicide Development Act, to facilitate the development of microbicides for preventing transmission of HIV and other diseases, and for other purposes. Research provisions would require the Director of the NIH Office of AIDS Research to: 1) expedite implementation of a Federal microbicide research and development strategic plan, 2) expand, intensify and coordinate the relevant activities of appropriate NIH research components, and 3) prepare and submit, within six months of enactment and annually thereafter, a report to Congress on Federal microbicide research implementation strategies. The bill would also require the Director of NIAID to establish a microbicide development unit within its Division of AIDS. The measure also contains provisions for relevant activities at the CDC and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Committee: Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Related bill: H.R. 3854.

S. 538 - Senator Biden (D-DE) introduced on March 7, 2005 the "Health Professionals Substance Abuse Education Act." In introductory remarks, he explained that the bill would do three things for each of the fiscal years 2006 thru 2010: (1) authorize $9 million in grants to train medical generalists to recognize substance abuse and know properly how to refer patients and their families for treatment; (2) authorize $6 million to fund a faculty fellowship program at educational institutions to teach courses on substance abuse, incorporate substance abuse issues into required courses, and educate health professionals about matters involving non-therapeutic uses of prescription medications; and (3) authorize $6 million to establish centers of excellence at medical centers or universities to initiate and implement training, research and clinical activities related to special focal areas of substance abuse, and provide opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration in curriculum development, clinical practice, research and policy analysis. Committee: Health, Education, Labor and Pensions.

S. 666 - Senator DeWine (R-OH) introduced on March 17, 2005 the "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act," a bill to protect the public health by providing the FDA with certain authority to regulate tobacco products. Committee: Health, Education, Labor and Pensions.

S. 803 - Senators Norm Coleman (R-MN) and Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) introduced on April 14, 2005 the "Help Expand Access to Recovery and Treatment Act of 2005," to provide parity with respect to substance abuse treatment benefits under group health plans and health insurance coverage. Committee: Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Related Bills, see H.R. 1258.

S. 884 - Senator Cantwell (D-WA) introduced on April 25, 2005 the "Methamphetamine and Identity Theft Study Act of 2005," instructing the Attorney General to conduct a study evaluating whether there is a connection between the commission of crimes involving methamphetamine and the commission of identity theft crimes. Committee: Judiciary.

S. 927 - Former Senator Corzine (D-NJ) introduced on April 27, 2005 the "Medicare Mental Health Modernization Act of 2005," which would amend Title XVIII of the Social Security Act to expand and improve coverage of mental health services under the Medicare program. Committee: Finance. Related Bills: See H.R. 1946.

S. 1051 - Senator Dodd (D-CT) introduced on May 17, 2005 the "Children and Family HIV/AIDS Research and Care Act of 2005," to amend the Public Health Service Act to reauthorize and extend certain programs to provide coordinated services and research with respect to children and families with HIV/AIDS. Committee: Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

S. 1332 - On June 29, 2005, Senator Arlen Specter (R-PA) introduced S. 1332, the Personal Data Privacy and Security Act of 2005. Of specific interest to NIH, the measure would prohibit the display, sale or purchase of Social Security numbers (SSNs) to third parties without an individual's informed consent. Exemptions are included for public health and research conducted for the purpose of advancing public knowledge. Researchers would be required to provide adequate assurances that the SSNs will not be used inappropriately, and that there are safeguards to protect the privacy and confidentiality of any information about individuals. S. 1332, which has two cosponsors, was placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders.

S. 1334 - On June 29, 2005, Senator Bunning (R-KY) introduced the "Professional Sports Integrity and Accountability Act," to provide for integrity and accountability in professional sports. In late September, the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee held a hearing to discuss the bill. Committees: Finance; Commerce, Science and Transportation.

S. 1436 - On July 20, 2005, Senator Mike DeWine (R-OH) introduced S. 1436, the Campus-Based Underage Alcohol Use Reduction Act. The bill would require the Secretary of Education to award grants to reduce the rate of underage alcohol use and binge drinking among students at institutions of higher education. Committee: Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

S. 1722 - On September 19th, Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) introduced S. 1722, the "Advancing FASD Research, Prevention, and Services Act." This legislation would amend the Public Health Service Act to reauthorize and extend the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome prevention and services program. S. 1722 would require the Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Director of the National Institutes of Health and in coordination with the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome to establish a research agenda for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) and award grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements to public or private nonprofit entities to pay all or part of carrying out research under such agenda. Committee: Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. Related bill HR 4272.

S. 1934 - On October 27, 2005, several cosponsoring Senators introduced the "Second Chance Act of 2005: Community Safety Through Recidivism Prevention." of 2005," which would reauthorize the grant program of the Department of Justice for reentry of offenders into the community, to establish a task force on Federal programs and activities relating to the reentry of offenders into the community, and for other purposes. Committee: Judiciary. Related bill: see H.R.1704.

S. 1960 - On November 3, 2005, Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) introduced S. 1960, the Integrity in Professional Sports Act, to protect the health and safety of all athletes, to promote the integrity of professional sports by establishing minimum standards for the testing of steroids and other performance-enhancing substances and methods by professional sports leagues, and for other purposes. Status: Placed on Senate legislative calendar under general orders.

S. 1974 - On November 8, 2005, Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL) introduced S. 1974, the Drug Free Varsity Sports Act of 2005. The bill would provide states with the resources needed to rid our schools of performance enhancing drug use. Committee: Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

S. 2046 - On November 17, 2005, Senator Mike DeWine (R-OH) introduced S. 2046, the National Methamphetamine Information Clearinghouse Act of 2005, to establish a National Methamphetamine Information Clearinghouse to promote sharing information regarding successful law enforcement, treatment, environmental, social services, and other programs related to the production, use, or effects of methamphetamine and grants available for such programs, and for other purposes. Committee: Judiciary.

S. 2104 - On December 14, 2005, Senator Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) introduced the "American Center for Cures Act of 2005," to amend the Public Health Service Act to establish the American Center for Cures to accelerate the development of public and private research efforts towards tools and therapies for human diseases with the goal of early disease detection, prevention, and cures. Specific aims of this proposed legislation are to: 1) expedite translational research and 2) implement some recommendations from the 2003 NAS study entitled "Enhancing the Vitality of the National Institutes of Health: Organizational Change to Meet New Challenges." Committee: Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

BILLS OF INTEREST - HOUSE

H.R. 240 - Representative Pryce (R-OH) introduced on January 4, 2005 the "Personal Responsibility, Work, and Family Promotion Act of 2005." The bill, which would extend welfare legislation, was approved by the Ways and Means Committee's Human Resources Subcommittee on March 15, 2005. The subcommittee amended the bill to cut federal welfare funding to any state that does not drug test those applying for or receiving welfare benefits. No state currently drug tests welfare recipients. In fact, a 2003 ruling by a federal appeals court that covers the states of Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee ruled that states cannot drug test welfare recipients because it is unconstitutional. Those states, and many others, could lose federal funding if the drug testing provision makes it into law. Status: pending at House Financial Services.

H.R. 314 - Representative Blunt (R-MO) introduced on January 25, 2005 the "Combat Meth Act of 2005," a bill to respond to the illegal production, distribution, and use of methamphetamine in the United States, and for other purposes. In part the bill would authorize funds to provide training to State and local prosecutors and law enforcement agents for the investigation and prosecution of methamphetamine offenses. Committees: Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security; Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health. Related Bills: See S. 103, H.R. 3889.

H.R. 370 - Representative Bilirakis (R-FL) introduced on January 26, 2005 the "Biomedical Research Assistance Voluntary Option Act," a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Service Code to allow taxpayers to designate part or all of any income tax refund be paid for use in biomedical research conducted through the NIH. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Ways and Means.

H.R. 798 - Representative Gordon (D-TN) introduced on February 16, 2005 the "Methamphetamine Remediation Research Act of 2005," a bill to provide for a research program for remediation of closed methamphetamine production laboratories, and for other purposes. Committee: Science, Subcommittee on Environment, Technology, and Standards. Status: passed by the House. Pending in the Senate.

H.R. 812 - Representative Cummings (D-MD) introduced on February 16, 2005 the "Dawson Family Community Protection Act," a bill to amend the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1998 to ensure that adequate funding is provided for certain high intensity drug trafficking areas. Committees: Government Reform; Energy and Commerce.

H.R. 864 - Representative Roybal-Allard (D-CA) introduced on February 16, 2005 a bill to provide for programs and activities with respect to the prevention of underage drinking. Committee: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health. Related Bills: See S. 408.

H.R. 1020 - Representative Rogers (R-MI) introduced on March 1, 2005 a bill to declare adequate pain care research, education, and treatment as national public health priorities, and for other purposes. In part the bill would establish within NIH a center to be known as the National Center for Pain and Palliative Care Research. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Veterans Affairs, Subcommittee on Health; Ways and Means; Armed Services.

H.R. 1054 - Representative Green (R-WI) introduced on March 2, 2005 the "Tools for Community Initiatives Act," which would establish an Office of Faith Based and Community Initiatives in the Executive Office of the President. Committee: Government Reform.

H.R. 1055 - Representative Hooley (D-OR) introduced on March 2, 2005 the "Comprehensive Methamphetamine Response Act," a bill to provide for the designation and funding of high intensity methamphetamine abuse and trafficking areas. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Judiciary.

H.R. 1056 - Representative Hooley (D-OR) introduced on March 2, 2005 the "Methamphetamine Precursor Control Act of 2005," a bill to amend the Controlled Substances Act with respect to the distribution of pseudoephedrine. Section 7 of the bill would authorize funding for NIH to conduct research on medical alternatives to pseudoephedrine. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Judiciary.

H.R. 1106 - Representative Kennedy (D-RI) introduced on March 3, 2005 the "Veterans Medical Research Assistance Voluntary Option Act of 2005," a bill to increase the number of well-trained mental health service professionals (including those based in schools) providing clinical mental health care to children and adolescents, and for other purposes. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Ways and Means. Related Bills: See S.537.

H.R. 1258 - Representative Ramstad (R-MN) introduced on March 10, 2005 the "Time for Recovery and Equal Access to Treatment in America (TREAT America) Act, a bill to amend the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, PHSA and the IRS Code of 1986 to provide parity with respect to substance abuse treatment benefits under group health plans and health insurance coverage. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Education and Workforce, Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations; Ways and Means. Related Bills: See S. 803.

H.R. 1290 - Representative Wilson (R-NM) introduced on March 14, 2005 the "Hepatitis C Epidemic Control Prevention Act," to require the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish, promote, and support a comprehensive prevention, research, and medical management referral program for hepatitis C virus infection. The bill also would require the Director of NIH to establish a Liver Disease Research Advisory Board, which would be charged with developing a Liver Disease Research Plan. Committee: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health. Related Bills: See S. 521.

H.R. 1350 - Representative Peterson (D-MN) introduced on March 16, 2005 the "Methamphetamine Blister Pack Loophole Elimination Act of 2005," a bill to eliminate the safe-harbor exception for certain packaged pseudoephedrine products used in the manufacture of methamphetamine. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Judiciary. Related Bills: See H.R. 1446.

H.R. 1357 - Representative Weldon (R-FL) introduced on March 17, 2005, the Human Cloning Prohibition Act of 2005, a bill to prohibit human cloning. Committee: House Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security.

H.R. 1376 - Representative Davis (R-VA) introduced on March 17, 2005 the "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act," a bill to protect the public health by providing the FDA with certain authority to regulate tobacco products. The bill text states that the use of tobacco products by the Nation's children is a pediatric disease of considerable proportions that results in new generations of tobacco-dependent children and adults and that nicotine is an addictive drug . Committee: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health.

H.R. 1378 - Representative Emerson (R-MO) introduced on March 17, 2005 the "Ephedrine Alkaloids Regulation Act of 2005," a bill to amend the Controlled Substances Act with respect to regulation of ephedrine alkaloids, including ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. The bill states that methamphetamine is a highly addictive drug that can be readily made from products and precursors purchased from retail stores. Committee: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health.

H.R. 1402 - Representative Kennedy (D-RI) introduced on March 17, 2005 the "Paul Wellstone Mental Health Equitable Treatment Act of 2005," a bill to provide for equal coverage of mental health benefits with respect to health insurance coverage unless comparable limitations are imposed on medical and surgical benefits. Committees: Education and the Workforce, Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations; Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health.

H.R. 1446 - Representative Souder (R-IN) introduced on March 17, 2005 the "Methamphetamine Abuse Prevention Act of 2005," a bill to eliminate the safe-harbor exception for certain packaged pseudoephedrine products used in the manufacture of methamphetamine, Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Judiciary. Related Bills: See H.R.1350.

H.R. 1528 - Representative James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) introduced on April 6, 2005 the "Defending America's Most Vulnerable: Safe Access to Drug Treatment and Child Protection Act of 2005," which would amend the Controlled Substances Act to protect vulnerable persons from drug trafficking, and for other purposes. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Health; Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security.

H.R. 1639 - Representative DeLauro (D-CT) introduced on April 14, 2005 the "Military Health Services Improvement Act of 2005," which would require pre- and post-deployment mental health screenings for members of the Armed Forces, and for other purposes. Committee: Armed Services.

H.R. 1704 - Representative Portman (R-OH [now resigned from the House]) introduced on April 19, 2005 the "Second Chance Act: Community Safety Through Recidivism Prevention Act of 2005," which would reauthorize the grant program of the Department of Justice for reentry of offenders into the community, to establish a task force on Federal programs and activities relating to the reentry of offenders into the community, and for other purposes. Committees: Judiciary; Education and the Workforce. Related bill: see S. 1934.

H.R. 1758 - Representative Andrews (D-NJ) introduced on April 21, 2005 the "Open Air Drug Market Penalty Act of 2005," which would amend the Controlled Substances Act to provide penalties for open air drug markets, and for other purposes. Committees: Judiciary; Energy and Commerce.

H.R. 1789 - Representative Kennedy (D-RI) introduced on April 21, 2005 the "Health Professionals Substance Abuse Education Act," designed to educate health professionals concerning substance use disorders and addiction. Committee: Energy and Commerce. Related Bill: See S. 538.

H.R. 1862*** - Representative Stearns (R-FL) introduced on April 26, 2005 the "Drug Free Sports Act," which would direct the Secretary of Commerce to issue regulations requiring testing for steroids and other performance-enhancing substances for certain sports associations engaged in interstate commerce. Committee: Education and Commerce; Education and the Workforce.

H.R. 1946 - Representative Stark (D-CA) introduced on April 27, 2005 the "Medicare Mental Health Modernization Act of 2005," which would amend Title XVIII of the Social Security Act to expand and improve coverage of mental health services under the Medicare program. Committees: Ways and Means; Energy and Commerce. Related Bills: See S. 927.

H.R. 2087 - Representative Frank (D-MA) introduced on May 4, 2005 the "States' Rights to Medical Marijuana Act," which would provide for the medical use of marijuana in accordance with the laws of the various States. Committee: Energy and Commerce.

H.R. 2124 - Representative Weldon (R-FL) introduced on May 5, 2005 the "Clinical Research Act of 2005," which would amend the Public Health Service Act to provide for clinical research support grants, clinical research infrastructure grants, and a demonstration program on partnerships in clinical research, and for other purposes. Committee: Energy and Commerce.

H.R. 2195 - Representative Lynch (D-MA) introduced on May 5, 2005 the "Act to Ban Oxycontin," which would provide for the withdrawal of the drug OxyContin from the commercial market. Committee: Energy and Commerce.

H.R. 2565*** - Representative Davis (R-VA) on May 24, 2005, introduced the "Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act," to reauthorize the Office of National Drug Control Policy Act and to establish minimum drug testing standards for major professional sports leagues. Committees: Government Reform, Energy and Commerce, Education and the Workforce.

H.R. 2829*** - Representative Souder (R-IN) introduced on June 9, 2005, the "Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2005." The bill expands and enhances certain authorities of the Office. Committees: Government Reform, Judiciary, Energy and Commerce, Select Intelligence.

H.R. 3084*** - On June 28, 2005, Representative Cliff Stearns (R-FL) introduced H.R. 3084, the Drug Free Sports Act of 2005. The bill would direct the Secretary of Commerce to issue regulations requiring testing for steroids and other performance enhancing substances for certain sports associations engaged in interstate commerce. The bill would also require the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the NIDA Director, to prescribe the substances for which professional athletes are tested, establish criteria by which professional sports associations may provide substances to athletes prior to or after any drug test, and establish criteria for test administration. The measure also calls for penalties for a positive test, and criteria under which the names of athletes testing positive may be disclosed. Committees: Energy and Commerce, Education and the Workforce.

H.R. 3196 - On June 30, 2005, Representative Henry Waxman (D-CA) introduced H.R. 3196, the Fair Access to Clinical Trials Act (FACT). The measure would require sponsors of privately and publicly funded studies of drugs, biologics, or medical devices to register using a database that builds on the National Library of Medicine's www.clinicaltrials.gov. It would provide public access to basic information on studies before they begin, such as the disease or condition with which the trial is concerned, the hypothesis being tested, the sponsor and principal investigator, and the sources of funding. Public access to the results of clinical studies, including primary and secondary outcomes and significant adverse events, would also be permitted under the legislation. H.R. 3196 also would authorize the Secretary of HHS to impose penalties for noncompliance, including revoking a sponsor's eligibility for further Federal funding and imposing civil money penalties. Committee: Committee on Energy and Commerce.

H.R. 3739 - On September 13, 2005, Representative John Boozman (R-AR) introduced the "Drug Courts Improvement Act of 2005." This Act would amend existing law by requiring the Attorney General to set uniform standards for mandatory drug testing that drug courts receiving funds from the Department of Justice's (DOJ) Drug Court grant program would be required to follow. In addition, the legislation would require drug courts receiving grant money from this federal program to impose mandatory sanctions whenever a participant fails a drug test. Committee: Judiciary.

H.R. 3854 - On September 21, 2005, Representative Christopher Shays (R-CT) introduced H.R. 3854, the Microbicide Development Act, to facilitate the development of microbicides for preventing transmission of HIV and other diseases, and for other purposes. Research provisions would require the Director of the NIH Office of AIDS Research to: 1) expedite implementation of a Federal microbicide research and development strategic plan, 2) expand, intensify and coordinate the relevant activities of appropriate NIH research components, and 3) prepare and submit, within six months of enactment and annually thereafter, a report to Congress on Federal microbicide research implementation strategies. The bill would also require the Director of NIAID to establish a microbicide development unit within its Division of AIDS. The measure also contains provisions for relevant activities at the CDC and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Committees: Energy and Commerce, International Relations. Related bill: see S.550.

H.R. 3889 - On September 22, 2005, Representative Mark Souder introduced H.R. 3889, the "Methamphetamine Epidemic Elimination Act," to further regulate and punish illicit conduct relating to methamphetamine, and for other purposes. Status: passed by the House. Related bill and legislative action: see S. 103, H.R. 314.

H.R. 3942 - On September 29, 2005, Representative James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) introduced the Professional Sports Responsibility Act of 2005, to establish a Federal Office of Steroids Testing Enforcement and Prevention to establish and enforce standards for the testing for the illegal use in professional sports of performance enhancing substances and other controlled substances. Committees: Judiciary; Energy and Commerce; Education and the Workforce.

H.R. 3955 - On September 29, 2005, Representative Steve King (R-IA) introduced the "Meth Lab Eradication Act," to amend the Controlled Substances Act to provide for the transfer of ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, and phenylpropanolamine to schedule V of the schedules of controlled substances, and for other purposes. Committees: Energy and Commerce; Judiciary.

H.R. 4212 - On November 2, 2005, Representative Frank Pallone (D-NJ) introduced the Advancing FASD Research, Prevention, and Services Act, to amend the Public Health Service Act to reauthorize and extend the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome prevention and services program, and for other purposes. Committees: Energy and Commerce; Education and the Workforce. Related bill: see S. 1722.

H.R. 4272 - On November 9, 2005, Representative Sam Farr (D-CA) introduced H.R. 4272, the Steve McWilliams Truth in Trials Act, to amend the Controlled Substances Act to provide an affirmative defense for the medical use of marijuana in accordance with the laws of the various states, and for other purposes. Committees: Judiciary; Energy and Commerce.

*** - Note: House Leadership and Committee chairs say they are still working to resolve the differences in these bills regarding steroids, and intend to have one bill that they will consider moving through the legislative process to focus on steroids issues.


Index

Research Findings

Program Activities

Extramural Policy and Review Activities

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